White T?

pizzathehut

Arachnopeon
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Mar 29, 2020
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is there such thing as a white tarantula or one close to white? Maybe more on the "nude" side in terms of color
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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is there such thing as a white tarantula or one close to white? Maybe more on the "nude" side in terms of color
Pure white- no

The only 2 really white ones aren’t good species for new T owners. One sends grown adults to the hospital can change your heart beating.

The other is almost as bad. Even at .5 inches its venom is one of the most painful.
 

pizzathehut

Arachnopeon
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Mar 29, 2020
Messages
26
Pure white- no

The only 2 really white ones aren’t good species for new T owners
What are they? I'll look into them. I'm already jumping the gun and getting an OBT. But that's only because I have great help with some friends that are in the hobby.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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What are they? I'll look into them. I'm already jumping the gun and getting an OBT. But that's only because I have great help with some friends that are in the hobby.
Great- ask your friends- I’m not here to help inexperienced people own such species.

That’s like telling a new surfer to ride the waves in Portugal.
 

ChaosSphere

Arachnosquire
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Mar 27, 2019
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70
Nhandus chromatus and Heteroscodra maculata comes to mind.
If you are looking for species that are uniformly white, then Aphonopelma might be your best bet - some of them are at least some pale shade of yellow/tan.

Gotta admit though, the closest thing to a white T that I've seen, is my Thrixopelma ockerti sling. It's kind of creamy white.
Keep in mind though, that my H. mac. Is not sporting adult colors.
 

pizzathehut

Arachnopeon
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Mar 29, 2020
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Nhandus chromatus and Heteroscodra maculata comes to mind.
If you are looking for species that are uniformly white, then Aphonopelma might be your best bet - some of them are at least some pale shade of yellow/tan.

Gotta admit though, the closest thing to a white T that I've seen, is my Thrixopelma ockerti sling. It's kind of creamy white.
Keep in mind though, that my H. mac. Is not sporting adult colors.
Thank you, I'll look into them and do some research.
 

pizzathehut

Arachnopeon
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Bold move, cotton!
I'm a believer that any tarantula is suitable when proper research is done and precautions put into place. When I need help, I have a friend that's borderline professional with the hobby that I can go to. But even so, as I do plan to get an OBT it'll still be some time before I do so I can be properly prepared. I've watched Toms Big Spiders videos on them to get some more insight as well. I do that with every species I'm interested in so I can be knowledgeable on them and not go in blind.
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnobaron
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Mar 8, 2020
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409
I'm a believer that any tarantula is suitable when proper research is done and precautions put into place. When I need help, I have a friend that's borderline professional with the hobby that I can go to. But even so, as I do plan to get an OBT it'll still be some time before I do so I can be properly prepared. I've watched Toms Big Spiders videos on them to get some more insight as well. I do that with every species I'm interested in so I can be knowledgeable on them and not go in blind.
If you consider yourself ready I presume you have the reflexes and experience required to handle your OBT bolting, threat posing and potentially biting. You can not obtain this from caresheets, only through experience with other tarantulas.

Do you have any idea how you’d react to such behaviour? Perhaps find out with a Tlitocatl and Brachy before you trial with an OBT...
 

DaveM

Arachnolord
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Jul 12, 2011
Messages
655
Nhandu chromatus might suit you well. It's not among the most docile, not going to be on any list of best beginner species, but it won't be hard to move or try to kill you. It has beautiful white coloration on its carapace and leg bands. That's a good suggestion.
These guys are just trying to look out for you, because bites from Old World species are no joke. I'm sure you can work up to caring for any species you want. An OBT was my first Old World a couple decades ago, and it seemed like no big deal for quite a while, but unexpected things can happen. I was too sleepy late one night and didn't close its cage properly; it escaped. I found it the next day after six hours searching with a flashlight. I had to disassemble a big desk to get it out from a crevice behind some drawers, with 'soft' utensils to keep from hurting it because it would bite anything that got near it. Keeping that OBT for a few years was good training, a solid bridge to even faster, harder species. What do you do when an escapee flies up to one corner of your ceiling, and it can race to another corner of your ceiling before you can move your step ladder? If you can get close enough to it, what if it jumps onto your face? Don't feel belittled in any way, or that you have to prove anything. People that have kept everything still find it just as thrilling to keep New Worlds. And it's best to have a lot of experience before getting the fastest Old Worlds.
 
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ColeopteraC

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Nhandu chromatus might suit you well. It's not among the most docile, not going to be on any list of best beginner species, but it won't be hard to move or try to kill you. It has beautiful white coloration on its carapace and leg bands. That's a good suggestion.
These guys are just trying to look out for you, because bites from Old World species are no joke. I'm sure you can work up to caring for any species you want. An OBT was my first Old World a couple decades ago, and it seemed like no big deal for quite a while, but unexpected things can happen. I was too sleepy late one night and didn't close its cage properly; it escaped. I found it the next day after six hours searching with a flashlight. I had to disassemble a big desk to get it out from a crevice behind some drawers, with 'soft' utensils to keep from hurting it because it would bite anything that got near it. Keeping that OBT for a few years was good training, a solid bridge to even faster, harder species. What do you do when an escapee flies up to one corner of your ceiling, and it can race to another corner of your ceiling before you can move your step ladder? If you can get close enough to it, what if it jumps onto your face? Don't feel belittled in any way, or that you have to prove anything. People that have kept everything still find it just as thrilling to keep New Worlds. And it's best to have a lot of experience before getting the fastest Old Worlds.
Agreed, it’s a common misconception that these species are recommended as they are slow, bland, uninteresting species. They are recommended as they are overall great, easy and interesting species to keep! I love my Smithi and T.Albop, my collection would be incomplete without them.
 

moricollins

Arachno search engine
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What are they? I'll look into them. I'm already jumping the gun and getting an OBT. But that's only because I have great help with some friends that are in the hobby.
Great help doesn't equal recommending someone get a defensive, lightning fast tarantula when they have virtually no experience with tarantulas.

The "whitest" tarantulas are either highly defensive and ridiculously fast, or very rare and expensive (xenesthis species "white", which actually isn't all that white)
 

Smotzer

Arachnoking
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I'm a believer that any tarantula is suitable when proper research is done and precautions put into place
Not with an H. maculata. You have, if I remember and read correctly, only have one T. right now and it’s a NW terrestrial. Reading and research won’t prepare you for owning this species. Don’t get it. I don’t think it will end well. You NEED more first hand experience.
 

moricollins

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I'm a believer that any tarantula is suitable when proper research is done and precautions put into place. When I need help, I have a friend that's borderline professional with the hobby that I can go to. But even so, as I do plan to get an OBT it'll still be some time before I do so I can be properly prepared. I've watched Toms Big Spiders videos on them to get some more insight as well. I do that with every species I'm interested in so I can be knowledgeable on them and not go in blind.
Well, maybe your "borderline professional" friend could tell you what white tarantulas there are...

Any tarantula can be suitable with precautions, the precautions being EXPERIENCE with other tarantulas first. Not reading, watching videos, etc. They do not prepare you for the speed, and quickness (different than speed) of some of these.

I had a P. Murinus ("OBT"), run up the my forceps, up my arm, and onto my back in about 3 seconds before I could even process what was going on. Luckily I had someone at home to capture it while it was lounging on my back.

One final comment from me: don't take people here saying to wait as criticism or "being mean", many of us have seen hundreds of people over the years come on to the forum, say they're getting a highly fast, defensive tarantula and then have later seen from the same person either a "my tarantula escaped" , or a "my tarantula lost a leg while rehousing" thread
 

viper69

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Well, maybe your "borderline professional" friend could tell you what white tarantulas there are...

Any tarantula can be suitable with precautions, the precautions being EXPERIENCE with other tarantulas first. Not reading, watching videos, etc. They do not prepare you for the speed, and quickness (different than speed) of some of these.

I had a P. Murinus ("OBT"), run up the my forceps, up my arm, and onto my back in about 3 seconds before I could even process what was going on. Luckily I had someone at home to capture it while it was lounging on my back.
A very senior OW breeder here has had OW Ts run up his body under his clothes, with no help from another person. He’s never been tagged, nerves of steel.
 

moricollins

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A very senior OW breeder here has had OW Ts run up his body under his clothes, with no help from another person. He’s never been tagged, nerves of steel.
He should do his maintenance with no shirt on, then there's no way tarantulas can get under his shirt lol :cool:
 

viper69

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One final comment from me: don't take people here saying to wait as criticism or "being mean", many of us have seen hundreds of people over the years come on to the forum, say they're getting a highly fast, defensive tarantula and then have later seen from the same person either a "my tarantula escaped" , or a "my tarantula lost a leg while rehousing" thread
And many OW owners end up giving their OWs away because generally speaking OWs will outgrow the skill set of the inexperienced keeper.

Looks great as a sling, but when it’s 5-8”, or larger if female at times, in a very short period of time, you now have a very fast, defensive, venomous animal that has significant size and thus a more confident animal.

We have bite reports from .5 inch OWs that were quite painful as well.

You have to marvel at OWs many will stand their ground against animals far larger than itself.

He should do his maintenance with no shirt on, then there's no way tarantulas can get under his shirt lol :cool:
He does actually. One OW crawled up his pant legs, a large Poki I believe.
 
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CJJon

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He does actually. One OW crawled up his pant legs, a large Poki I believe.
I can't image how a pokie gets up your pants leg! I had one run into a sock once...but I wasn't wearing it!
 

viper69

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I can't image how a pokie gets up your pants leg! I had one run into a sock once...but I wasn't wearing it!
This all happens during a rehouse. He’s not on the boards as much, true wealth of knowledge. He’s never been tagged and he’s primarily kept and bred OWs for prob 50 years.

Another well known national breeder friend of mine had a P met run up his arm across his shoulders down the other arm before he had time to react. Said it was one of the fastest moves he’d experienced. All from a 5” female. This is a guy that has decades of experience with venomous snakes.
 

DomGom TheFather

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No one should jump in the deep end before they can swim but I will never be the man who is willing to tell you that you can't.
Have fun with your obt. Be safe, have fun and know your limitations.
 
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