whip scorpions

Justin

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What is the biggest whip scopion you can get? and can any one give my care for giant tanzanian giant tailess whip scorpions. thanks.
 

phoenixxavierre

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Originally posted by Justin
What is the biggest whip scopion you can get? and can any one give my care for giant tanzanian giant tailess whip scorpions. thanks.
I don't know what the biggest is but I have some that are fairly large, 8 inches or so from tip of front leg to back leg.

As far as care, temps 70F-90F, humidities range 75%-90%. They like to climb and hide so I have found that a large space to keep them in is best, at least a ten gallon tank for one, a 20 gallon for two or more. They will cannabilize if not fed well.

Cage should contain a water dish, substrate (I use peat moss/potting soil), wood, logs, sticks, rocks, etc. for them to climb on and under to hide. I'll try to post a pic of one of my whipscorp setups (maybe tomorrow since the lighting isn't great in here tonight).

Hope this helps a little,

Paul
 

phoenixxavierre

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Originally posted by Justin
What is the biggest whip scopion you can get?
Oh, okay.

I didn't understand what you were asking first time I read it. I think, someone please correct me if I'm wrong, that Damon variegatus is the largest.

Anyone know if that scientific name is the accepted one for Tanzanian tailless whipscorps?

Paul
 

Alex S.

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Amblypygi

The largest amblypygids in the world are those of the genus Acanthophrynus, which can get up to 10" in leg-span and have nearly 20" whip-spans. They are not available in the hobby though.

Damon diadema is the species imported as the Tanzanian Giant Tailless Whipscorpion.

Alex S.
 

phoenixxavierre

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Re: Amblypygi

Originally posted by Alex S.
The largest amblypygids in the world are those of the genus Acanthophrynus, which can get up to 10" in leg-span and have nearly 20" whip-spans. They are not available in the hobby though.

Damon diadema is the species imported as the Tanzanian Giant Tailless Whipscorpion.

Alex S.
Thankyou, Alex! Where are the genus Acanthophrynus found?

Do you know where can I find information on the correct naming and IDing of D. diadema as opposed to D. variegata or variegatus, like scientific papers and such? (need my coffee!)

Any idea where the name D. variegatus came from or why it is used rather than D. diadema?

And a stupid question for you, are they considered arachnids or insects? I thought they were arachnids but I have heard people say both. Thanks, Alex!

Paul
 

Wade

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Re: Re: Amblypygi

Originally posted by phoenixxavierre


And a stupid question for you, are they considered arachnids or insects? I thought they were arachnids but I have heard people say both. Thanks, Alex!

Paul
For once, I can beat Alex to it...They're Arachnids :D

Apparently, there are new world species that are bigger than Damon, but they're said to do very poorly in captivity.

Wade
 

phoenixxavierre

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Re: Re: Re: Amblypygi

Originally posted by Wade
For once, I can beat Alex to it...They're Arachnids :D

Apparently, there are new world species that are bigger than Damon, but they're said to do very poorly in captivity.

Wade
Awesome, Wade! Thankyou for clearing that up for me!

Paul
 

Alex S.

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Amblypygi

Darn you Wade ;)

They may look like insects as the front pair of legs are modified into feeling mechanisms, leaving the other three pairs of legs thicker and used for walking, but they are arachnids, as they are chelicerates and also have two body segments like the other Arachnida.

The Acanthophrynus are found in Central American and northern South American caves. The species Acanthophrynus coronatus is the largest species known to be exact, and can take down frogs and lizards as large as its self for prey. They are amazing predators.

As for Damon diadema and Damon variegatus, both species are probably imported, but Damon diadema is by far the most commonly imported. Both species look extremely similar.

Alex S.
 

phoenixxavierre

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Re: Amblypygi

Originally posted by Alex S.
Darn you Wade ;)

They may look like insects as the front pair of legs are modified into feeling mechanisms, leaving the other three pairs of legs thicker and used for walking, but they are arachnids, as they are chelicerates and also have two body segments like the other Arachnida.


That's what was throwing me was the first two pair of legs!

The Acanthophrynus are found in Central American and northern South American caves. The species Acanthophrynus coronatus is the largest species known to be exact, and can take down frogs and lizards as large as its self for prey. They are amazing predators.

Whoa!

That's awesome!

Gotta have a couple of those!!

As for Damon diadema and Damon variegatus, both species are probably imported, but Damon diadema is by far the most commonly imported. Both species look extremely similar.

Alex S.
Do you know of any papers I can read to differentiate between the two? Is the difference in the two a simple one? It would be great to know if I have one, the other or both!

Thanks much, Alex!

Paul
 

Alex S.

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Damon sp.

Hey Paul, I do not know of any papers on them but the differences are very small. Their location within Tanzania is also different. Most likely you have Damon diadema, as overall, that really is the only Damon species imported. Hope that helped :)

Alex S.
 

phoenixxavierre

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Re: Damon sp.

Originally posted by Alex S.
Hey Paul, I do not know of any papers on them but the differences are very small. Their location within Tanzania is also different. Most likely you have Damon diadema, as overall, that really is the only Damon species imported. Hope that helped :)

Alex S.
Thankyou, Alex, yes that helps. Where would I find this information, Alex?

I need to be able to differentiate between the two, if possible.

I'm working on getting more specific collection locale on what I have received.

Feel free to email me off list. Thanks again,

Paul
 

Alex S.

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Damon sp.

Hey Paul, its almost 100% that you have Damon diadema as that is, for the most part, the most common species of giant amblypygid in that region. I mainly also included Damon variegatus as there is a chance, yet a very small one, that D. variegatus could still be imported. Overall, though, you almost certainly have D. diadema :)

Alex S.
 

Ravnos

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There seems to be really very little information on Damon species out there. I got a captive born baby, in hopes that I can get some 'technical support'. :)

Rav
 

phoenixxavierre

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Originally posted by Ravnos
There seems to be really very little information on Damon species out there. I got a captive born baby, in hopes that I can get some 'technical support'. :)

Rav
Kewl!

I have had three or four mothers (out of around a dozen adults) give birth so I have ended up with lots of babies. Thing is the adults came from different collectors so I'm trying to find info on them to see if there are any significant differences between them.

I had hoped and still do that there are papers somewhere on these.

I guess I'll just keep on looking!

Thanks, Alex and Rav!

Paul
 

Ravnos

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I truly cannot get over how alien these guys look.



Rav
 

Bob

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Is the photo above a male? I have two I bought from cold blooded creations and would like a male and female while they still have them. One looks like the photo above and the other has a longer "elbow to claw" length. Not much breeding info on the web. My male is always hiding from the female. He is much smaller.(maybe one molt) No fighting, just appears to try to stay away.

I wonder if I should separate it untill maybe one more molt ?

Steve Dixie........are you out there? Steve is the only guy I know who is breeding these guys.

Bob
 

Ravnos

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I honestly don't know if mine is male or female... but I do know someone who has some experience breeding them and I will inquire about the basis this evening. You have me curious now.

Myself, I would probably keep the male and female seperated, and only put them together when breeding time came around... but I'm real paranoid about having my critters accidentally eat each other. :)

Rav
 

phoenixxavierre

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Hi all,

Keeping whipscorpions together you always run the risk of cannibalization. I've lost a couple this way, usually the larger females eating the smaller males.

I keep them together myself. If you keep them well fed, they usually don't cannibalize, though, but the risk remains.

Cheers,

Paul
 
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