Which species?

Ehliza

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 29, 2016
Messages
29
Hello arachnopeople! Currently, I own a tarantula sling, but I've been wanting a scorpion. My local pet shop carries Asian Forest Scorpions and the enclosure seems sucky so I wanna take it in. How different are they than emperors? I've heard they're a bit meaner (though my T is pretty feisty so I don't mind). I've also been told they die randomly for no reason? My main question is, which species should I aim for. I'd prefer the Asian Forest, but I wanna hear your opinions/thoughts.

P.S. I know it's better to use scientific names, but I'm still working on memorozing them, please bear with me :)
 

ArachnoDrew

Arachnoprince
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Feb 1, 2017
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1,586
As far as living conditions they are kept the same Emps and Asian forest . Lightly moist substrate with high humidity. Asian forest are more aggressive but they're perfect first time scorp choice. Once fully matured they will live a long time
 

Christianb96

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 7, 2017
Messages
284
ive never heard of them dying randomly but they are excellent first scorpions. they are more defensive then P.imperator, and require the same care. plenty of substrate to burrow, heat and humidity. i have 2 asian forrest right now and they are awesome and have a nice size to them!
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
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Jan 22, 2017
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297
I'm also considering a first scorp. Is P. Empirator less defensive than an h. arizonensis??
 

RTTB

Arachnoprince
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Dec 4, 2016
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There are always exceptions to the rules but my experience is H arizonensis can be quite irritable. They are not to be handled.
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
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Jan 22, 2017
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297
In that case I need to talk to a co-worker of mine about letting me handle a 2 inch scorpling. Any other less-defensive, beginner scorpions?
 

TheScorpionMan

Arachnoknight
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Jan 6, 2014
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190
In that case I need to talk to a co-worker of mine about letting me handle a 2 inch scorpling. Any other less-defensive, beginner scorpions?
Not really, scorpions aren't very social animals and they don't like being held. Emperor is probably the best for that. Although I had a pretty chill arizonensis a while back that didn't mind lol
 

Alexw

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
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Any other less-defensive, beginner scorpions?
I've got a flat rock scorpion - Hadogenes troglodytes. It has never used it's stinger on me or prey. It is a little nervous when disturbed but otherwise very amicable. I've only ever seen it's stinger raised up in "attack position" when foraging at night. It is huge and from South Africa. It likes dry desert environments so mites and mold will not be a problem - unlike Emporer and Asian forest scorpions.

I haven't tried to handle mine personally, but I doubt it would be a problem if I did.

The book on scorpion care I have lists its venom in the least dangerous catagory. The book recommends Emperor and Asian Forest scorpions before Flat Rock only because Flat Rocks can be damaged more easily by a careless keeper.
 
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TheScorpionMan

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Jan 6, 2014
Messages
190
I've got a flat rock scorpion - Hadogenes troglodytes. It has never used it's stinger on me or prey. It is a little nervous when disturbed but otherwise very amicable. I've only ever seen it's stinger raised up in "attack position" when foraging at night. It is huge and from South Africa. It likes dry desert environments so mites and mold will not be a problem - unlike Emporer and Asian forest scorpions.

I haven't tried to handle mine personally, but I doubt it would be a problem if I did.

The book on scorpion care I have lists its venom in the least dangerous catagory. The book recommends Emperor and Asian Forest scorpions before Flat Rock only because Flat Rocks can be damaged more easily by a careless keeper.
I've never kept this species before personally but I can vouch for it as well. The scorpion book I have also lists it as least dangerous.
 

brolloks

Arachnobaron
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Apr 6, 2016
Messages
348
I wish they had more of those scorpion books in e-book versions! Would make it a lot easier for people outside of the US to purchase :(
 

Alexw

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 20, 2017
Messages
16
Thank you @TheScorpionMan and @Alexw! What dimensions for an enclosure would you deem ideal? Would you happen to know how much a scorpling would cost in USD?
I'm not sure how much a scorpling would cost, but I got my adult male for $45 I believe. I house mine in a 10 gallon aquarium with a screen top:


I'm going to move the water dish away from heat pad because it evaporates too fast.

I built a number of hides with slate rock but the scorpion seems to like hiding under the Mopani wood more.
 
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darkness975

Latrodectus
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Aug 31, 2012
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You shouldn't handle any Scorpion, regardless if it is more high strung or not.
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
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Jan 22, 2017
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How much substrate do one of these require in terms of burrowing?? And what kind of substrate as well...Would eco Earth work?
 

ArachnoDrew

Arachnoprince
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Feb 1, 2017
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How much substrate do one of these require in terms of burrowing?? And what kind of substrate as well...Would eco Earth work?
The more sub you can provide the better. For Asian forest types ide recommend atleast 5"+ of substrate. Most people use eco earth. Other people will say "peat moss" is better. Either one will work just fine. If you can get your hands on some "vermiculite" to mix in a little eith your substrate it will help hold a better burrow. Eco earth when dried out becomes very fluffed up and can eventually collapse if not compacted tightly and kept moist (DO NOT ADD TOO MUCH MOISTURE) just enough to where if you grab a handful of sub. And squeeze it, a few drops come out.... If you over saturate it. Mold will begin to grow
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
The more sub you can provide the better. For Asian forest types ide recommend atleast 5"+ of substrate. Most people use eco earth. Other people will say "peat moss" is better. Either one will work just fine. If you can get your hands on some "vermiculite" to mix in a little eith your substrate it will help hold a better burrow. Eco earth when dried out becomes very fluffed up and can eventually collapse if not compacted tightly and kept moist (DO NOT ADD TOO MUCH MOISTURE) just enough to where if you grab a handful of sub. And squeeze it, a few drops come out.... If you over saturate it. Mold will begin to grow
Does this apply to the h. Troglodytes?
 

ArachnoDrew

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No they spend their time wedged between flat rocks. Thus the name flat rock lol. They don't need deep substrate
 
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