Where to buy in NJ... also indoor temps question

Grunyon

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 20, 2013
Messages
12
I'm looking to buy my first tarantula soon. I'm afraid of buying mail order because of the cold weather. I don't feel like waiting another 2-3 months. Does anyone know any pet stores or breeders close to or in the central NJ area? I know Adams Pet Safari in Chester NJ has a couple that I need to go take a closer look at. Also, the pet store inside the Quakertown Flea Market had a whole shelf full of them if I remember right. Anyone know any other places?

Also if anyone can recommend a species I am mainly looking for a show species. I'll be putting it in an attractively set up cage in my living room most likely. Because of this I was considering an aboreal species with pretty colors like a versicolor. I am also very impressed with the giants such as the salmon bird eater.

The main thing I'm concerned about is I heat my house mainly with a wood stove so my temps can go anywhere from 60 to 90 in the winter as the wood stove reaches its peak and dies overnight/while I'm at work. Summer temps I'm not as worried about since I usually run one window unit downstairs and keeps the house at a comfortable and steady temperature... usually a cool feeling 75ish downstairs. Is this going to bother most species? The wood stove sucks the moisture out of everything so I'm assuming I would have to mist a lot or get a desert species. Is this going to be a huge problem?
 

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
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May 12, 2015
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The main thing I'm concerned about is I heat my house mainly with a wood stove so my temps can go anywhere from 60 to 90 in the winter as the wood stove reaches its peak and dies overnight/while I'm at work. Summer temps I'm not as worried about since I usually run one window unit downstairs and keeps the house at a comfortable and steady temperature... usually a cool feeling 75ish downstairs. Is this going to bother most species? The wood stove sucks the moisture out of everything so I'm assuming I would have to mist a lot or get a desert species. Is this going to be a huge problem?
60F is too cold, you should keep them from around 70F and upwards. You might consider to get a space heater with a thermostat that you can leave on during night or when you´re at work. The wood stove does make the air dry, but so does electric heating devices. It´s not really a problem as the enclosures functions like a microclimate if you set them up correctly. I live in an area with dry air and low winter temperatures as well and I keep tropical species with no problems.
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
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Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
If you're having temperature fluctuations that extreme and really dry air u would best to stick with a dog or cat :cat:
 

Formerphobe

Arachnoking
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Feb 27, 2011
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2,342
Ironically, I lived in NJ for about 10 years in an old farmhouse with a woodstove as the sole heat source. I did not keep tarantulas during that time as I did not have a dedicated room that I could maintain more consistent, desireable temps.

Some of the Aphonopelma species might do okay, but the dramatic temperature fluctuations in the winter are definitely not ideal.

Unless you have a room you can use a space heater in to provide more consistent temps, you might want to rethink getting a tarantula.
 

REEFSPIDER

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
412
I live in california.
That being said at a time my T room was almost completely lacking any insulation. To say 60 is too low is complete bollocks. Alot of tropical regions reach 60 in the early morning. And im not condoning it but my Ts (old world N new world) have all experienced nights well below 60f. I now have a better situation for them with a designated heater and insulation. But to say that they cant take it is funny to me. Tarantulas are actually quite resilient animals. They can take a cold night, its best not to have them be cold for prolonged periods though. As far as species go A versicolor makes a great web tube display. When you see her it will be nice. If you try a versi as your first i would start with a juvenile specimen because the slings can be tricky.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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I live in california.
That being said at a time my T room was almost completely lacking any insulation. To say 60 is too low is complete bollocks. Alot of tropical regions reach 60 in the early morning. And im not condoning it but my Ts (old world N new world) have all experienced nights well below 60f. I now have a better situation for them with a designated heater and insulation. But to say that they cant take it is funny to me. Tarantulas are actually quite resilient animals. They can take a cold night, its best not to have them be cold for prolonged periods though. As far as species go A versicolor makes a great web tube display. When you see her it will be nice. If you try a versi as your first i would start with a juvenile specimen because the slings can be tricky.
I know Puerto Rico doesn't reach 60 where A. laeta lives on a regular basis, such a temperature would be record low. Only a TINY fraction of the island may even achieve such a temp too. What are the common tropical places that generally reach 60F in the early morning? I'd be curious to know. I wasn't aware there were a lot that do.....

60 is too low on a chronic basis, taking a cold night is not the same as chronic as you know. The OP isn't talking about a night of 60F, right?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,548
I'm looking to buy my first tarantula soon. I'm afraid of buying mail order because of the cold weather. I don't feel like waiting another 2-3 months. Does anyone know any pet stores or breeders close to or in the central NJ area? I know Adams Pet Safari in Chester NJ has a couple that I need to go take a closer look at. Also, the pet store inside the Quakertown Flea Market had a whole shelf full of them if I remember right. Anyone know any other places?

Also if anyone can recommend a species I am mainly looking for a show species. I'll be putting it in an attractively set up cage in my living room most likely. Because of this I was considering an aboreal species with pretty colors like a versicolor. I am also very impressed with the giants such as the salmon bird eater.

The main thing I'm concerned about is I heat my house mainly with a wood stove so my temps can go anywhere from 60 to 90 in the winter as the wood stove reaches its peak and dies overnight/while I'm at work. Summer temps I'm not as worried about since I usually run one window unit downstairs and keeps the house at a comfortable and steady temperature... usually a cool feeling 75ish downstairs. Is this going to bother most species? The wood stove sucks the moisture out of everything so I'm assuming I would have to mist a lot or get a desert species. Is this going to be a huge problem?
Too bad you don't use coal, a more even type of heat, wood is too cyclical, filled w/the familiar high to lows, I hated it.

The 60 temp is too low on a regular basis. I also think the daily fluctuations over the course of months would confuse the T, given that temp is an environmental cue these animals. If you had a space heater with a constant temp, that would be fine then.

Avics, eg A. versicolor, are not recommended as a species for first time tarantula owners.
 

Grunyon

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 20, 2013
Messages
12
My house is very small. It's almost like a vacation cabin. Downstairs I have a kitchen and a living room and upstairs the whole floor is my bedroom and bathroom. I could probably put the enclosure upstairs in the bedroom for less temperature fluctuation from the wood stove and some kind of low wattage heating pad or bulb on a rheostat for an extra couple of degrees of warmth when needed. In the summer, and only when it gets it's hottest, I'll run a somewhat large window AC unit upstairs and let the cool air flow downstairs naturally. This usually keeps the downstairs much more comfortable than outside and the upstairs a comfortable 68-70.

I can be cheap when it comes to the propane bill or electric bill. I'd rather crank the wood stove if I feel like walking around without slippers and a sweatshirt. Not a big fan of just turning the heat to 70. And I'd hate to run a space heater. Maybe a mini one like what people put in their cubicles? I think it may be a good idea to maybe get a species that doesn't require high humidity all of the time at first and see how easy it is to keep things slightly humid.

Does anyone know any stores that has some of these little fellows in stock? Or a breeder that would allow me to pick up?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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Bulbs over Ts tend to kill them, under tank heaters do as well. However people have had some success with UTHs that are placed on the SIDE of the container. A space heater is your best and safest tool for T husbandry.

Like all exotic animals, there are places to be cheap, and there are places where being cheap kills them.

I would get a scrubland/desert species, one that is not expensive. Also slings (spiders less than 2" in this context) can dry out very easily.

@EulersK probably lives in the driest, and hottest climate of any of us. Ask him what he would do. I tagged him, he'll be around at some point.
 

EulersK

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If you want a show species that can handle extremes, look at NW terrestrials. I made a list of a few to look at. During your dry winter months, I'd overflow the water dish every other week or so. During the more humid summer months, just supply a water dish and that's all. I wouldn't get a sling of any species until you have the basic husbandry down. All of the species I'm recommending are usually out all of the time, but understand that there will always be exceptions. They'll all be set up basically the same way as well. The prices will vary wildly between these species, so just take a look around to see what fits in your budget. The majority of them are very slow growers, so either get yourself a large juvenile or an adult unless you don't mind having a small spider for a few years.

B. vagans
B. albopilosum
B. boehmei
B. smithi
G. pulchripes
G. porteri
G. rosea
G. pulchra (might want to keep this one a tad more humid)
A. chalcodes

The A. chalcodes is by far my favorite beginner tarantula, and luckily they're very inexpensive. You can easily find an adult female for around $50, which is what I suggest that you do.
 

REEFSPIDER

Arachnobaron
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May 6, 2016
Messages
412
Well for what its worth i was merely stating my experiences in a non combative way. @viper69 I never said temps go below 60 in the tropics but to say they dont get that low ever? At sea level maybe... but at elevation i personally feel 60f isnt that far fetched. I simply stated this number as a general "absolute" low they would experience in the wild. As you said 60f would be like a record low. You are correct. Now, i said my own Ts native to the tropics have experienced temps well under 60f with no detrimental effect. Peace
 

nicodimus22

Arachnomancer
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Sep 26, 2013
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709
The A. chalcodes is by far my favorite beginner tarantula, and luckily they're very inexpensive. You can easily find an adult female for around $50, which is what I suggest that you do.
Somehow, this species has gone completely under my radar, and I only do NW terrestrials. Looks really nice. If/when I get more, it will be on my list. Thanks for bringing it up!
 

Formerphobe

Arachnoking
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While temps certainly fluctuate in desert settings, wild tarantulas typically dig deep burrows that protect them from heat of day and chill of night. They don't have that opportunity in captivity.

For a limited number of tarantulas, you could do a small enclosure(s) inside big enclosure set up, with a heat mat on the back wall of the outside enclosure. Might not be overly attractive, but would provide more consistent warmth if temps drop between stove stokings.

In my woodburner house, if i was gone more than 8 hours or so, I stayed bundled up for awhile until I got the stove cooking good. If I had to go out of town in the winter, it meant turning off the water and draining the pipes. Tarantulas in enclosures would not have thrived.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
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Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
I know that http://www.net-bug.net/ is in that section, but they only do shows in PA and NY. You can go to the website and then figure out if the drive would be too far as well. If you email Anastasia at the email address on their website, she knows T's really well. She can probably tell you what T's they have in stock that will handle your temperature range okay.

But you can do Internet orders if you do Fed Ex "Hold for Pickup". In that case the T will never be on the truck out for delivery. It will stay in the Fed Ex facility where temperatures are regulated (or at least that is the case here in SC).

EDIT* I have done hold for Fed Ex hold for pickup at least 5 times. They haven't screwed up yet.
 
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viper69

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Well for what its worth i was merely stating my experiences in a non combative way. @viper69 I never said temps go below 60 in the tropics but to say they dont get that low ever? At sea level maybe... but at elevation i personally feel 60f isnt that far fetched. I simply stated this number as a general "absolute" low they would experience in the wild. As you said 60f would be like a record low. You are correct. Now, i said my own Ts native to the tropics have experienced temps well under 60f with no detrimental effect. Peace
I'd be surprised if they reach 60F in tropical rainforests on a regular basis, which is what the OP was describing I felt. Winter temps that would be low for quite a few months, that's not tropical. Tropical rainforests are primarily by the equator and thus their temperatures are pretty constant within a small range, compared to say a desert. However, you are correct regarding montane regions. They are of course much cooler.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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In my woodburner house, if i was gone more than 8 hours or so, I stayed bundled up for awhile until I got the stove cooking good. If I had to go out of town in the winter, it meant turning off the water and draining the pipes. Tarantulas in enclosures would not have thrived.
Had the same experience for many years. No Ts during that time, too much temp swing.
 

dokpm0

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
2
Space heaters seem to be popular among T enthusiasts. I might have to give one a try for the few weeks of winter we have in Texas. :) Though I am a bit leery of leaving one on unattended. I do have central heating. Before I got a T I tended to turn the heat way down or off completely while I was at work during the day. I also used to turn it down to 65° at night. I've increased that to 67° at night. With the T in my computer room with the door closed it should end up a little above that in that room. I'm still figuring out a good daytime at work setting. I bumped it up to 70° this morning before I left for work. Today's the first day heat's been needed while I was at work with a T at home. Yesterday was spring like. Today it's winter again. Who knows what tomorrow will bring. The joys of Texas weather.
 
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