Where do I go from here? Help

Drummingduckdude

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I've been keeping tarantulas for a year now and I'm in love with the hobby I've got nearly any docile species out there but I've recently wanted to buy new species like tarantulas from poecilotheria genus and some African species but the problem is ive read that these tarantulas are aggressive and only for the advanced keeper? I feel I'm ready to take them on but my question is stupid but just wanna be safe how do you class yourself as an advanced keeper I've always classed myself as a beginner cause all my tarantulas are-docile , some are skittish but I own no aggressive tarantulas so what's the logical step to move on to advanced species like this? I'm confident in tarantula keeping should I get these tarantulas? Thanks?
 

Venom1080

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well, what species do you have now? if you have a few and know what youre doing, a Ceratogyrus is a good starter baboon. E pachypus and M balfouri are as well ive heard but are rare and more expensive.
before getting into any OW arboreal you should get a Psalmopoeus first. they generally have the same attitude but without the venom.
 

Chris LXXIX

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I've spent more than 10 years with NW intermediate T's before owning Asians and Africans and still I don't consider nor view myself as an 'advanced keeper'.

More an humble Theraphosidae artisan :-s

* I don't know what you have, but IMO don't fall in the mistake that a lot of new keepers easily tend to fall in, like dreaming about 'coloured' OW's or potent venom Africans skipping completely all of those amazing, class A, mighty NW intermediate T's that can teach a lot, such genus Phormictopus, Megaphobema, Pamphobeteus etc
 

KezyGLA

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IME the thing to worry about Asians and Africans is speed and venom.

Old world species are lightning fast compared to new world usually.

You could go ahead and get one but you just need expect the unexpected and always be on the ball when dealing with care/feeding these species.

If getting an African would advise getting a fast and defensive new world burrowing species like Ephebopus murinus first in order to get used to the speed and defensive attitude.

If you wish to get a Poec then expect a more skittish, fast species rather than defensive. Though they still have a nasty venom. I would suggest getting Psalmopoeus pulcher or irminia first to get used to a speedy arboreal that may have a little attitude like Poecilotheria.

This is only a suggestion. I am the kind of person that believes you learn from doing research of what you are getting. Once you get them the experience you have is learning from mistakes when they happen(if they happen).
 

Moonohol

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First off, no tarantula is aggressive. OW tarantulas are defensive and often extremely skittish, that's all. If you aren't sure whether or not you're ready for a full-blown OW, then get yourself a Psalmopoeus. They are the perfect intermediate species to bridge the gap between NW and OW. I know many recommend P. cambridgei as a first Psalmo. I started out with a P. irminia myself. Any Psalmo will do though, as they're extremely fast and more venomous than most other NW tarantulas but not as much as, say, a Pokie. If you feel you're ready to jump right in to Old Worlds, I'd highly recommend Harpactira pulchripes. Dry obligate burrowers are very simple to care for and once they establish a burrow, there's very little chance of them ever bolting during routine maintenance.
 

Rob1985

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If you're looking to get into Pokies I suggest a P. regalis. When it comes to Pokies they're "chill".

Otherwise I suggest an OBT or a P. lugardi.

If you're just wanting to experience the speed of an OW with some of the attitude, P. irminia is a great choice!
 

gypsy cola

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I really feel the whole defensiveness of most Old Worlds are severely overrated.

An appropriate sized enclosure with plenty of sub (depending on species) and good hiding spots/anchors will do most of the work for you.

If you tap on the cage before you maintenance, most species will run and hide and you will never see it. Species that are obligate burrows you will never interact with or see (called pet holes for a reason). The biggest reason they are not considered for beginners is due to the toxicity. In other words, its not recommend for boobs because they tend to overreact to everything and don't understand the concept of leaving spiders alone. I have never seen threat display from any of my OWs. I have seen a threat display from EVERY New World species I own except one (T.cyaneolum).

I recommend two species for you.

•OBT- easiest tarantula in terms of needs. Rehouse into it's permanent enclosure when it hits 2 inches and you will never have any problems at all. Decent amount of sub (they do burrow), plenty of hiding places and anchor points. This tarantula will rather hide than attack. The term Orange Bity Thing comes from people who have small enclosures, no hiding spots, and feel like they need to hassle spider for some bro points. Other species from this genus I also recommend.

•H.lividium or whatever its called these days. A proper set up with this species and you swear you won't one. I only see mine if I visit my T room at 2-3 am in the morning without sounding like a herd of buffalos and I choose not to blink.

I am hesitant about P.irmina. Slings tend to burrow and fast. If you are a worry wort, you will probably end up killing it. However, I do recommend buying them in general because they are gorgeous.
 

Andrea82

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'in other words, it is not recommended for BOOBS because they tend to overreact....'
:rofl:
Better sell my OW before my boobs start to overreact! :rofl:
 

Spidermolt

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IME the thing to worry about Asians and Africans is speed and venom.

Old world species are lightning fast compared to new world usually.

You could go ahead and get one but you just need expect the unexpected and always be on the ball when dealing with care/feeding these species.

If getting an African would advise getting a fast and defensive new world burrowing species like Ephebopus murinus first in order to get used to the speed and defensive attitude.

If you wish to get a Poec then expect a more skittish, fast species rather than defensive. Though they still have a nasty venom. I would suggest getting Psalmopoeus pulcher or irminia first to get used to a speedy arboreal that may have a little attitude like Poecilotheria.

This is only a suggestion. I am the kind of person that believes you learn from doing research of what you are getting. Once you get them the experience you have is learning from mistakes when they happen(if they happen).
Its Funny reading this because I swear that I was going to write same thing word for word
 

boina

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Psalmopoeus forever!

Ahem, :embarrassed:, sorry, couldn't help myself.
I was in your position a while ago and a friend talked me into getting Psalmos first, just to get used to the speed. Asians and African species usually are A LOT faster than NW species. I've never regretted it. In fact, I've given up any plans on owning Poecis to buy more Psalmos (and Omothymus, to be honest) instead :wideyed:. So: get a Psalmo. I'm picking up my next one next week:smug:.

If you want a terrestrial I can recomment Monocentropus. They are fast and pretty, but without any tendency to attack. Quite a few of the rest are pet holes and I actually want to see my spiders at least once in a while.
 

Jeff23

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I have gotten to the point of owning Psalms and don't feel the need for an OW T's except for Harpactira pulchripes and Ceratogyrus darlingi and Hysterocrates gigas and Monocentropus balfouri and probably a bunch others.:wacky:
 

Ungoliant

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I feel I'm ready to take them on but my question is stupid but just wanna be safe how do you class yourself as an advanced keeper I've always classed myself as a beginner cause all my tarantulas are-docile , some are skittish but I own no aggressive tarantulas so what's the logical step to move on to advanced species like this? I'm confident in tarantula keeping should I get these tarantulas? Thanks?
IMO, it's not just the length of time but the breadth and depth of experience. You could keep Grammostola rosea for 15 years, and you would still be not much more experienced than a beginner. On the other hand, you can have 20 different species, including some fast ones, but if they're all slings, you might not be as experienced as you think.

If you're thinking about getting into OW Ts but aren't sure if you're ready, you can get some feedback by posting what you're already keeping. But at one year, I would encourage you to try some of the fast "intermediate" NWs before jumping right into Pokies and baboons.

In the end, this hobby is not a race. There are many beautiful species to enjoy keeping, and barring tragedy, you have many years to learn and grow as a keeper.
 

cold blood

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Anoplogaster

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I agree with most of what is mentioned here. But there are quirks about OWs that even fast NWs (like P. iriminia) will never teach you. They're just different spiders.

Also, keep in mind that keeping spiders doesn't involve you constantly messing with them (unless you're a breeder). Once you have a spider settled in, you only fill the water, give it food occassionally, and discard boluses..... until the next re-house. Not a ton of interaction, especially if they just hide whenever you open the enclosure (most OWs do). So really, the thought of getting an "intermediate" spider, at least in my opinion, serves little more than just prolonging the time period between now and the day you get the spider you actually want. And I agree, it's definitely not a race. But in the same way, you shouldn't necessarily feel so restricted, either. Keeping OWs is not actually as gnarly as it sounds..... they mostly just hide a lot;)

Do your research first, of course! And it's all dependent on your personal comfort level. Some people never keep OWs, and are perfectly happy. But if you're interested in them, I'd say just go for it:D
 

Jeff23

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I agree with most of what is mentioned here. But there are quirks about OWs that even fast NWs (like P. iriminia) will never teach you. They're just different spiders.

Also, keep in mind that keeping spiders doesn't involve you constantly messing with them (unless you're a breeder). Once you have a spider settled in, you only fill the water, give it food occassionally, and discard boluses..... until the next re-house. Not a ton of interaction, especially if they just hide whenever you open the enclosure (most OWs do). So really, the thought of getting an "intermediate" spider, at least in my opinion, serves little more than just prolonging the time period between now and the day you get the spider you actually want. And I agree, it's definitely not a race. But in the same way, you shouldn't necessarily feel so restricted, either. Keeping OWs is not actually as gnarly as it sounds..... they mostly just hide a lot;)

Do your research first, of course! And it's all dependent on your personal comfort level. Some people never keep OWs, and are perfectly happy. But if you're interested in them, I'd say just go for it:D
I think I would end up never getting an OW tarantula based on the idea of jumping straight into it. For me the majority of it is pure mental. If someone is nervous/scared and has jerky movements around a tarantula I could imagine them getting bit (or having an escaped tarantula) fairly quick. It would also serve to remove what the enjoyment is about.

Since I now own Psalmopoeus and Tapinauchenius it has become much more of a comfortable thought for me.
 

Andrea82

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I think my story is well known, but for newer members and OP, I'll type it again.
2 years ago I got two P.irminia slings at an expo. When I went to house them, one of them teleported on my hand, and i instinctively flung it off in a reflex. I knew their bite was worse than say, an Avic, and my brain apparently registered that as well.
The sling escaped because of my reaction, and two hours of searching were useless. All the time I was looking, thoughts went through my mind like 'what if it bites my kid, my cat?'
Fortunately, I found it and housed it quickly. But something in me had changed. I wasn't as relaxed as I was before, getting nervous to even opening my B.albopilosum enclosure.
It didn't help that the irminia slings were like one inch OBT's, threatposturing at any and all disturbances, slapping everything, even food. I was nervous as hell when I needed to rehouse them. It wasn't fun anymore, and what was worse, my other T's weren't fun anymore as well.
So I rehomed the irminia's, deciding they were too much. (I already had P.pulchers, but they were just fast and zippy).
It took me some time to shake it all off, but I am now a reasonable confident keeper again. Even though rehouses/homing of fast species with bad venom still make my heart race :D
My E.pachypus is coming in this afternoon, so I can expect a high bloodpressure again :p

Moral of the story; start slow, and, if possible, try to get a real life view of spider in question. Visit other keepers if possible.
There is no rush whatsoever to get OW.
 
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