When people buy advanced species as one of their first

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
661
It's not as crazy as I thought awhile back. Whenever I used to read a thread where someone got an OBT or a Psalmopoeus irminia as their first or second tarantula, I would facepalm. But there are definitely a lot of advanced species I would love to get. I only have one tarantula, but I've been seriously tempted a few times to buy a T. stirmi. Crazy, I know, but dang, they're cool. A lot of people get the P. muticus as their first tarantula, at the recommendation of several experienced users on AB. When I first heard about that, I was baffled, but to each his own, and the P. muticus is slower than most old worlds. What are you guys' thoughts?
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 27, 2017
Messages
353
P irminia is a difficult T? really?

I got mine as one of my second batch of Ts, and aside from an escape when I screwed up while rehousing it, I have found mine to be relatively easy to care for.
 

PanzoN88

Arachnodemon
Joined
Sep 15, 2014
Messages
704
It is like a 15 yr old in drivers education getting a Ferrari rather than starting with a ford. Same with tarantulas, beginners see the nice looking big P. Metallica, buy it, then realize they got something way harder to take care of. Two factors come to mind when debating on why beginners get advanced species as 1st tarantulas:

1. Colors
2. They think they'll have a cool eight legged pet that they could train to do backflips and cartwheels.
3. Most do no research, and if they do, they research in all the wrong places.

If they would just do research, the would realize that there are so Manet colorful tarantulas that are great for display, but are also easy to care for and docile. They will also learn that trying to train a tarantula is pointless as it is impossible to do so. Speed, bites, Hollywood, uneducated keepers, and did I forget to mention speed, all are what all culminates to a keeper that was too quick to start out with big and fast, rather than big and not so fast.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
I haven't had many problems with the "advanced" species, being pretty new in the hobby (less than 3 years). S. cal T's are super easy, just have to be careful. As for the more difficult husbandry species, I have not had too many troubles thus far. I got my stirmi around 3 months ago, and it has molted twice now. Not super challenging IMO, but I did do a lot of research and made sure I knew what I was getting into. My opinion on beginners getting advanced species is that I don't have a real problem with it. So long as they either did their research or ask for help on these boards and take care of it properly, then it should be fine. I have no idea the skill level of te person behind the screen, all I can do is help them if they have problems ;) I'd never say to never get any species, no matter the experience. Maybe based on character, but that's a little different :D You should go for it once you have the care down, stirmis are great. One of my favs now, it recently molted 2 days ago :p
 

Devin B

Arachnobaron
Joined
Sep 30, 2016
Messages
326
My opinion is that as long as the person interested in buying has done PLENTY of reasearch on "how to" and "how not to" take care of the animal then they should get whatever it is they want to get.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
661
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/beginners-and-ows.295261/

To add to what I said in that thread, I'm not really interested in hard to care for species as I just don't have the time. T Stirmi will never be in my collection or even on my to get list. I prefer hardy animals that I don't have to really worry about if the power goes out for a day or two.
I live in houston. If my power goes out, every animal is screwed. Even me.
 

Ondottr

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 16, 2017
Messages
17
I feel ya. I'm still super new too, maybe that's why I'm more drawn to hardy docile Ts. But lately I've considered adopting my bf's C. lividus. He's been pretty disappointed with it (not sure what he expected from an aggressive obligate burrower lol) and I'd probably appreciate it more. But it's definitely more difficult than my G. rosea. A month ago I was like NOPE but lately I've been thinking I could handle it.
I think I just lack confidence, so if anything out of the ordinary happened, I'd struggle. Like if it escapes during a rehouse or something. That thing is too dang fast for my comfort.
I could handle the basics though.
Just a matter of doing the research, asking for help, and respecting the T.
 

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
92
Ours goes out at least a few times a year, mostly because of wrecks or weather, usually not for very long but ya never know. It's fine in the summer but the winter will be iffy. I will have to invest in something to keep them warm in case that does happen. I'm also planning on moving towards the west coast in the next two years so it'll be subject to change...lol.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
661
Ours goes out at least a few times a year, mostly because of wrecks or weather, usually not for very long but ya never know. It's fine in the summer but the winter will be iffy. I will have to invest in something to keep them warm in case that does happen. I'm also planning on moving towards the west coast in the next two years so it'll be subject to change...lol.
How will you move your collection?
 

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
92
I feel ya. I'm still super new too, maybe that's why I'm more drawn to hardy docile Ts. But lately I've considered adopting my bf's C. lividus. He's been pretty disappointed with it (not sure what he expected from an aggressive obligate burrower lol) and I'd probably appreciate it more. But it's definitely more difficult than my G. rosea. A month ago I was like NOPE but lately I've been thinking I could handle it.
I think I just lack confidence, so if anything out of the ordinary happened, I'd struggle. Like if it escapes during a rehouse or something. That thing is too dang fast for my comfort.
I could handle the basics though.
Just a matter of doing the research, asking for help, and respecting the T.
I was unpacking my first pokie, a 1.5inch Vittatta and I had its new enclosure in a huge bin to eliminate its horozontial movement so it couldn't escape. Well it was sitting on the edge of its new enclosure and I was about to give it a nudge in, well it bolted down the new enclosure and up the 2foot wall of the bin and down onto the bed...got about a foot and paused, I scooped her up into a catch cup. I was super calm about the whole ordeal but had I not been it could have been a disaster...I kinda watched in awe biding my time until she could be caught. Just tracking her movements. It was a huge learning experience, I've rehoused her since with no problems at all. Keep that in mind. Confidence and the ability to stay calm is super vital.
 

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
92
How will you move your collection?
I haven't decided, honestly, it's kinda on my mind but I have a lot of saving money before I make the move, I also have to find a job out there and a newer vehicle before I make the move but I've got plenty of time before I make the decisions.
 

Ondottr

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 16, 2017
Messages
17
I was unpacking my first pokie, a 1.5inch Vittatta and I had its new enclosure in a huge bin to eliminate its horozontial movement so it couldn't escape. Well it was sitting on the edge of its new enclosure and I was about to give it a nudge in, well it bolted down the new enclosure and up the 2foot wall of the bin and down onto the bed...got about a foot and paused, I scooped her up into a catch cup. I was super calm about the whole ordeal but had I not been it could have been a disaster...I kinda watched in awe biding my time until she could be caught. Just tracking her movements. It was a huge learning experience, I've rehoused her since with no problems at all. Keep that in mind. Confidence and the ability to stay calm is super vital.
That's exactly the situation I'm worried about, and the thought that makes me want to wait a bit before taking on a quick bitey T... I'm not a person who panics, and I like to think I could stay calm, but who knows how I'll react, really, when I get startled. I've read about methods to deal with it, but I've never actually experienced a loose T running around my house. It's why I'm holding off for now.
But apart from just practicing and dealing with it when it happens, I'm not sure there's a way to really prepare for that. So I'm just waiting until I feel more confident overall.
 

Vermis

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2005
Messages
207
2. They think they'll have a cool eight legged pet that they could train to do backflips and cartwheels.

They will also learn that trying to train a tarantula is pointless as it is impossible to do so.
Er... have you encountered many such people?
 

Ghost56

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 28, 2016
Messages
443
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/beginners-and-ows.295261/

To add to what I said in that thread, I'm not really interested in hard to care for species as I just don't have the time. T Stirmi will never be in my collection or even on my to get list. I prefer hardy animals that I don't have to really worry about if the power goes out for a day or two.
Stirmi are actually a piece of cake to keep IMO. All that has to be done any different than other T's, is simply keep the sub moist. Now the hairs... well those are a problem lol.
 
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