When does a sling become a juvenile? When does a juvenile become a sub-adult?

Paul Larke

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 10, 2017
Messages
5
Just wondered if there was any observable criteria do distinguish one stage from the next. Purely for curiosity...
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
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1,899
No, I've seen lots keepers all give different definitions for each. I pay attention more to DLS than relaying on sling, juvies, etc.

slings are usually less than 2 inches
juvies are bigger than that but not yet close to breeding size
sub adults should be at breeding size in the next molt or two
adults are MM or females at breeding size or greater.
 
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Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
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Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,058
slings are usually less than 2 inches
juvies are bigger than that but not yet close to breeding size
I also consider the coloring, especially for dwarf species. (By looking at size alone, many dwarf tarantulas would be slings for most of their lives.)

Juvenile = starting to get its adult coloring
 

D Sherlod

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Messages
222
I agree with @Trenor

Or juvenile is when they start talking back
Subadult is when they constantly steal your car
Adult they buy their on car
Mature they move out for good. :smug:
 

thetonestarr

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 2, 2021
Messages
11
Bit of thread necromancy here but I thought I'd share my own $.02.


Egg - first life stage. You should never see your tarantulas in this stage.

EWL - egg-with-legs - Can be considered first life stage post-"hatch", but technically is still an incubating stage. Quite literally looks like the egg popped out legs.

Spiderling - Slings. After EWL, they molt and enter first instar. This is when they look like an ordinary, very tiny sling, and goes until they begin distinctly showing transformation to adult colors. Typically less than 1 to 1.5 inches DLS.

Juvenile - Next stage after slings; they have begun showing distinct coloration changes. Can resemble adults in color (as with Grammostola, for example), but will be skinnier. In non-dwarf species, usually about 1 to 1.5in up to 2.5 to 3 inches.

Sub-adult - Fully taken on adult coloration and similar build, but not adult-sized yet. In non-dwarf species, typically 2.5 to 3 inches up until maturity.

Adult - Can still have room to grow (typically only in females), but effectively full-sized and capable of reproducing. Females will have distinct spermathecae flap, males will have pedipalp bulbs.
 

jezzy607

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 29, 2002
Messages
713
All immature spiders are in a juvenile stage. Terms like "spiderling" and "subadult" describe which juvenile stage. The stages between "spiderling" and "subadult" are often just described as juvenile, often with a measurement of some kind included. Whether a particular spider is still a "spiderling" or has become a "subadult" is definitely something that can be interpreted or decided differently, depending on who is making the determination.
 
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