What's so bad about arboreals?

GingerC

Arachnosquire
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Feb 10, 2017
Messages
117
I've been around Arachnoboards for a while now, and a lot of the time, when someone is asking about Ts for beginners, arboreals are one of the first to be dismissed as "too difficult". Even the ones with adorable little pink feetsies!

I know that an arboreal tarantula needs a tall enclosure and some humidity, but what magical quality do they possess that makes them so gosh dang diddly difficult for a newbie that arboreals are so easily disregarded? Given how simple tarantulas are in the first place, I imagine they'd have to be incredibly fragile.
 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
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Jun 27, 2010
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2,059
There's nothing wrong with arboreals. My second tarantula was an A. versicolor* sling. (My first was a B. albopilosum sling.) However, while I wouldn't try to dissuade someone from getting a NW arboreal as a first T, they should at least be aware that they are more challenging than NW terrestrials. They are faster, better at climbing glass, and far more likely to make a break for freedom when the cage is opened for feeding/maintenance. This can be alarming, particularly for the fledgling keeper who may not be prepared for the speed or jumpiness of arboreal spiders - or who may flat-out panic when one runs up their arm.

Also, particularly as slings, they can be more delicate and less forgiving of even minor husbandry mistakes - like inadequate ventilation or humidity. Some of the beginner terrestrials, on the other hand, are practically bullet-proof as long as they aren't totally neglected. They are also much slower and more likely to just sit there like a pet rock or scurry into their hides when the cage is opened.

*Yes, I know - they've changed the name to C. versicolor - but it was still A. versicolor when I bought him and remained that for the entirety of his life. I'm not going to go changing his name posthumously!
 
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Moakmeister

Arachnolord
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Oct 6, 2016
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631
This can be alarming, particularly for the fledgling keeper who may not be prepared for the speed or jumpiness of arboreal spiders - or who may flat-out panic when one runs up their arm.
Lol when my G. pulchripes so much as lifts one leg, I'm like
GAH! :anxious::anxious::eek:
Im not ready for an arboreal, as much as I'd like one.
 

Arachnophoric

Arachnoangel
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Aug 29, 2016
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Definitely second that there's nothing wrong with arboreals. Just like chanda explained, they're a bit more complex than your average starter Ts, with more speed and the ability to run up your walls before you can flinch. I may not be in the majority for this observation either, but it seems to me the trend that most arboreals have a bit more... attitude than terrestrials. If the keeper has never had experience with tarantulas, I know I'd certainly have more peace of mind that they started off with a B. albopilosum than a Psalmopoeus of some flavor.

That being said, if a new keeper wanted to keep a Caribena versicolor as their first T and have put in a little research as to the sensitivities of the species, I definitely wouldn't try talking them out of it. :)
 

YagerManJennsen

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
508
I've been around Arachnoboards for a while now, and a lot of the time, when someone is asking about Ts for beginners, arboreals are one of the first to be dismissed as "too difficult". Even the ones with adorable little pink feetsies!

I know that an arboreal tarantula needs a tall enclosure and some humidity, but what magical quality do they possess that makes them so gosh dang diddly difficult for a newbie that arboreals are so easily disregarded? Given how simple tarantulas are in the first place, I imagine they'd have to be incredibly fragile.
I believe it's because avicularia (pink toe) husbandry can be tricky to master, especially with all of those care sheets floating around. Getting the right info can be hard if you don't know where to look. If you have the right information and nice folks to guide you though it than an avic can be a fine first T.
 

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
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Oct 6, 2016
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631
My G. pulchripes is one of the "pet rocks" I was talking about! :p
Maybe i should clarify: i only jump when i have my tongs/whatever in the enclosure with her. If im just watching her, she could suddenly do twenty laps and i wouldnt even blink. If an arboreal suddenly decided to make a run for it, then as long as im not in the enclosure im likely to not flinch.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
What's so bad about arboreals? Everything. Forget those hippie tree loving 'Tarzan/s' on eight legs, obligate burrowers are the quintessence of Theraphosidae :kiss:

:troll:
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
My first was a dinky avic. I have had that spider for a few years now. I've never had on die, so I don't have any first hand experience as to why they seem so fragile. I do mist the sides of my avics tanks daily and have a lot of ventilation. I found out a lot of members don't like misting. By the ti me I found this site I had been doing it daily for 2.5 years. Probably will never stop at this point.
 

Leila

Arachnobaron
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Feb 7, 2017
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Once I gave my A. avic a proper set-up in her enclosure, everything has been dandy. I gave her a few stems of silk leaves (about 8-9 broad leaves total,) and she is finally webbing and not hanging out on the sides of the enclosure all day. She is so darn cute hiding all about her little 'tree.'
Also, she is a master at catching prey.

Having said that, I was not fond of the avic for the first few weeks of owning her. She used to dart out of her enclosure but does not do so any longer. :) She just goes to her happy place in the leaves and waits while I fill her water. Sweet lil gal.
 

OliverWhatever

Arachnosquire
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Sep 14, 2015
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My first tarantula was a P.metallica, which, from I can tell, is frowned upon by members of this forum. Generally, I agree. You don't recommend it, or other fast defensive species, if you are not sure of someones ability to take proper care of the tarantula without putting yourself or the spider at risk. And since that's something that can be hard to judge from a forum post, it's better to be on the safe side and recommend "beginner species" which are usually less defensive and easier to care for.

If you want to get an arboreal for a first T, go for it, but do make sure you know what to expect, so you don't end up like one of those people asking for help capturing an escaped OBT from under your toddlers bed.
 

Arachnophoric

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What's so bad about arboreals? Everything. Forget those hippie tree loving 'Tarzan/s' on eight legs, obligate burrowers are the quintessence of Theraphosidae :kiss:

:troll:
I'm holding you personally accountable for my recent desire purchase of an M. robustum, sir. ;)

Can't wait to watch the little scamp become a pet hole.
 

Jlw13194

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 22, 2016
Messages
41
I got an A avic for my first T and she's been thriving she's since molted in the 3 months ive had her and has graduated to super worms now :p They make some awesome webs if you give them the proper set up. I personally prefer arboreals to terrestrials
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
To sum up your answer in some short phrases. Here are some of the most common genus of New World arboreal T's
------------------------------------------------
Avicularia, Ybyrapora, & Caribena - Very fragile (deaths often never diagnosed for exact cause) / Easiest of arboreal T's listed here for rehousing (but still harder than a terrestrial)

Tapinauchenius - Less fragile / Fastest of the fast tarantula / Skittish and can be defensive in certain instances depending on species / Plan your rehousing carefully

Psalmopoeus - Less fragile / More significantly potent venom (among the highest for a NW tarantula) / Fast / Personalities vary and can be very aggressively defensive (especially P. irminia) / Plan your rehousing carefully
 
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Goodlukwitthat

Arachnoknight
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Mar 10, 2015
Messages
179
I got an A avic for my first T and she's been thriving she's since molted in the 3 months ive had her and has graduated to super worms now :p They make some awesome webs if you give them the proper set up. I personally prefer arboreals to terrestrials
lol my A. avic stays either inside or on the side of her cork tube... bout the only time shes on the walls of her enclosure is to poop on it haha, little buggar.
 

mistertim

Arachnobaron
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Sep 4, 2015
Messages
551
There's nothing necessarily wrong with getting an arboreal early on. You just have to be aware that they are faster than terrestrials and they move in more directions and dimensions generally. You spook a terrestrial and, depending on the species, they'll most likely run to their hide or just stand there and give you a threat posture. You spook an arboreal (especially a genus like Poecilotheria, Psalmopoeus, Tapinauchenius, etc) and you are more likely to get a vaguely spider shaped blur teleporting all over the enclosure, and possibly onto you; now imagine it is a 9 or even 10 inch spider (P. ornata and P. rufilata can get that big)...that would be a pretty intimidating scenario no matter who you are. You just need to be even more aware of your surroundings and alert to where the spider is and what it is doing when you're dealing with arboreals.
 
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