What was the hardest lesson to learn?

Caseyface

Arachnosquire
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Feb 23, 2017
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57
Hi all!

I believe one of the best ways to learn, outside of extensive research, is from one another. As one who is somewhat new to the hobby, I'm curious of experiences you'd like to share with a newbie.

Perhaps a lesson you had to learn when first starting out in the hobby, or maybe even something that you learned the hard way?

Thanks for sharing! :D
 

cold blood

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Patience

Simplification...Most problems are the result of over-complication of a relatively simple thing.

It used to bother me when small slings didn't eat.
 

tristan4033

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Mar 16, 2017
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151
Humidity, I always followed care sheets as close to as I could, but people on the board have helped me.

Don't mist unless absolutely necessary just overfill the dish
 

Rittdk01

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Oct 4, 2016
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264
Humidity, by far. Just watch the spider for their signs in regards to humidity. Most signals are obvious...standing in their water they need more moisture, or Standing on the walls or on tip toes--soil is too moist. I am successfully raising an adult t stirmi with zero prior experience with humidity dependent tarantulas.
 

Caseyface

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Feb 23, 2017
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57
Patience

Simplification...Most problems are the result of over-complication of a relatively simple thing.

It used to bother me when small slings didn't eat.
My slings eat well...except for the 1/4" euathlus sp. red. I know these are poor eaters, so I am trying not to overthink it too much. :) I may just have a tiny little guy for a few years. ;)
 

Caseyface

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Feb 23, 2017
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57
Humidity, I always followed care sheets as close to as I could, but people on the board have helped me.

Don't mist unless absolutely necessary just overfill the dish
I have been lurking for awhile on the boards, this was my first thread. (holla?) I have learned so much in that time, though. Especially in regards to humidity...how care sheets will have very specific humidity "requirements" that cause beginners to overwater.
 

Caseyface

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Feb 23, 2017
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57
Humidity, by far. Just watch the spider for their signs in regards to humidity. Most signals are obvious...standing in their water they need more moisture, or Standing on the walls or on tip toes--soil is too moist. I am successfully raising an adult t stirmi with zero prior experience with humidity dependent tarantulas.
Ah, kudos on your stirmi! :D :D I have an AF b. albo that successfully tips over her water dish each and every time I fill it. She's spends her time tending to the expansion her burrow, and with the addition of her ever-growing bald spot, I very much suspect that she is in premolt. I know I am probably overthinking it, my common theme, but I do want to make sure that she has enough moisture for a successful molt.

I don't want to over do it by refilling her water dish on a daily basis, so I have taken to misting half of the enclosure.
 

Abyss

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Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
Hardest lesson for me to learn was that i didnt know NEAR as much about keeping T's as i thought i did before i found the forum.
I got ALOT rite in spite of pet store advice etc but have learned so much since i found the forum.
 

johnny quango

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May 17, 2013
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262
The hardest lesson I've learnt is that some tarantulas no matter what we as keepers do they just won't make it through no fault of ours. Sometimes it's a genetic lottery and I used to beat myself up over any losses, it took me a while to be at peace with it so to speak I still find it a little difficult but I always tell myself that I may have given them a little hope
 

Venom1080

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Ah, kudos on your stirmi! :D :D I have an AF b. albo that successfully tips over her water dish each and every time I fill it. She's spends her time tending to the expansion her burrow, and with the addition of her ever-growing bald spot, I very much suspect that she is in premolt. I know I am probably overthinking it, my common theme, but I do want to make sure that she has enough moisture for a successful molt.

I don't want to over do it by refilling her water dish on a daily basis, so I have taken to misting half of the enclosure.
try burying a large vial. she'll have a much harder time tipping that.

my hardest lesson i suppose was buying more than one of the same sling. i used to but one at a time and now i have a bunch of males. i always buy at least two now, and at least 4 for Asian arboreals like Lampropelma, Cyriopagopus, Omothymus etc.
 

Caseyface

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Feb 23, 2017
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57
try burying a large vial. she'll have a much harder time tipping that.

my hardest lesson i suppose was buying more than one of the same sling. i used to but one at a time and now i have a bunch of males. i always buy at least two now, and at least 4 for Asian arboreals like Lampropelma, Cyriopagopus, Omothymus etc.
Oooh, I like the way you think. I have plenty of vials, so I will give that a try. Mwahaha.
 

Venom1080

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Oooh, I like the way you think. I have plenty of vials, so I will give that a try. Mwahaha.
helps alot in well vented cages as well. i used to have to refill at least once a day, now its like once every few weeks.
 

viper69

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Dec 8, 2006
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KISS- Keep It Simple Stupid

In my first foray into Avics many, many, many years ago before I knew of this forum, 3 versicolor slings learned the hard way that their owner couldn't master ventilation and humidity. I gave up on Avics for about 3 years, went on to more terrestrials NW/OW.

Then a long time dealer, no longer in the biz, gave me solid advice, "keep them more dry and buy a 2" Avic". That solved everything, along w/the research I continued to do. Now I raise Avics as easily as Brachy.
 

viper69

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except for the 1/4" euathlus sp. red. I know these are poor eaters
I know you will read on the forum they are poor eaters, but this simply isn't the case. I have never had a problem having mine eat regularly. I don't do anything special, I keep mine at 72-75 day/ 68-72 night.

When someone says "it's a poor eater", you have to ask what is that person comparing it too?
 

Caseyface

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Feb 23, 2017
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I know you will read on the forum they are poor eaters, but this simply isn't the case. I have never had a problem having mine eat regularly. I don't do anything special, I keep mine at 72-75 day/ 68-72 night.

When someone says "it's a poor eater", you have to ask what is that person comparing it too?
I've only seen the sling eat once, but I offer it dubia legs and freshly killed FFF regardless. It'll eat if it needs to, if not? Well, it gets removed. My AF has eaten three times in the ~1.5 months that I've had her. I'm not sure if it's over-kill, or because I have a small collection, but I keep track of when and what they eat. (More obvious for the bigger ones, of course). She likes small hornworms. :D
 

viper69

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I've only seen the sling eat once, but I offer it dubia legs and freshly killed FFF regardless. It'll eat if it needs to, if not? Well, it gets removed. My AF has eaten three times in the ~1.5 months that I've had her. I'm not sure if it's over-kill, or because I have a small collection, but I keep track of when and what they eat. (More obvious for the bigger ones, of course). She likes small hornworms. :D
not overkill at all. Feeding records are useful. FFF?? Fruit flies perhaps? If so, fruit flies are nutrient deficient and should not be used.
 

boina

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Mar 25, 2015
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Hardest lesson:

I cannot have every tarantula I want because I don't have enough space and time. This is made worse by the fact that every species - ok, nearly every species - has something to make it appealing.

Other hard lessons:

Don't panic. First time a larger tarantula molted with me (large juvenile A. genic) she was wobbly for a week or so. I was like: :arghh::bigtears:. Is she dehydrated? Does she have DKS? Will she die? Er... No. She had PMS (post molt syndrome, can also mean pre molt syndrome)

Don't listen to self styled experts. Just because someone is loud and assertive (and obnoxious) doesn't mean he's right - or even that he knows what he's talking about.

Nobody has the right to tell me how many tarantulas to keep or where to keep them. My tarantulas - my living room - my life. Don't like it? Don't visit. That was a hard lesson for me, because I mostly try to get along with people and not offend them.
 

14pokies

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Always use tongs to remove water bowls, uneaten prey,bolus etc.. I have had more close calls by breaking this rule than any other...
 

PanzoN88

Arachnodemon
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Sep 15, 2014
Messages
693
Don't stress over Avic care, that was a self taught lesson I learned the hard way a few months ago. Luckily my A. Metallica lived a full life and he passed peacefully two weeks ago. My A. Versicolor sling was the casualty that helped me figure out what I did wrong. I will never house an arboreal in a pill vial ever again as I feel they are not good for species that require a lot of ventilation.
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
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Sep 14, 2013
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100% agree with @cold blood.

Having a T (or even a pede) hide away for weeks/months in premoult can be a worry at first. The temptation to disturb it just to check on it is high.

However with time you realise to dial it back.
 
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