What tricks to make your T eat?

Scorpionking20

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
158
I have several Ts that have rather small abdomens. I keep them with fresh water, and offer crix and B budias from time to time, but they don't eat very well. Most of them are Avics, but some aren't.

Anyways, I just thought I'd ask you guys if you have any tricks to help a T eat when you know they aren't premolt and look like they could use a good meal (example: I have a MF A metallica that molted many months ago, has good fange, and usually just bites the prey before releasing...but doesn't go after it later)

Thanks, and have fun sharing your' ideas!
 

popcangenie

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 6, 2010
Messages
135
to feed my golden knee i some time rub the dead cricket by the fangs it sometimes gets him going or you can try make them get mad and try and get them to attack it just some ideas
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
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Jan 31, 2010
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1,310
The normal trick I use is pulling the roach out of a hat. They are amazed when I do this and immediately eat {D

As for getting them to eat, it's pretty much their choice.
 

Hobo

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
Staff member
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Jul 27, 2009
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2,206
Try increasing the temperature and humidity. That apparently gets them going. Otherwise, don't worry about it for two weeks and try again.
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
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Nov 21, 2009
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733
Scorpking, + 1 on Hobo's reply

In addition, you might want to wait until just ahead of a passing frontal system to attempt feeding. Like the oldtimers say "with clear skies and high barometer, the cows are laying down and the fish won't bite. Then, just ahead of a frontal system the fish go haywire and you fill the cooler quickly". There is alot of truth to this. I've been lucky using it to get various finicky pets to feed over the years. Overall activity in animals including feeding increases at these times. Other than being fairly certain it's not premolt, which it helps to keep a molt record on indivs to help determine, you might give it a try. :)
 

Ictinike

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
460
Scorpking, + 1 on Hobo's reply

In addition, you might want to wait until just ahead of a passing frontal system to attempt feeding. Like the oldtimers say "with clear skies and high barometer, the cows are laying down and the fish won't bite. Then, just ahead of a frontal system the fish go haywire and you fill the cooler quickly". There is alot of truth to this. I've been lucky using it to get various finicky pets to feed over the years. Overall activity in animals including feeding increases at these times. Other than being fairly certain it's not premolt, which it helps to keep a molt record on indivs to help determine, you might give it a try. :)
Agreed Terry and I've noticed lately this year around times of molt weather patterns and barometric pressure almost seems to trigger various inherent things within my captive collection.

I swear with an upcoming few days of rain and lower than normal barometric pressures I've had T's in premolt for weeks decided now was the time to properly molt. Very interested in tracking more of this over time but one could see with lower pressures an "easier" molt.

This also begs the question as to the effects of either very low pressures, say below sea level as conversely higher than normal pressures such as say Denver above sea level. Do T's bred and raised say in Denver find it easier to molt if they were then to be shipped to a home in much lower over all pressures?

Good stuff to think about! :)
 

jeryst

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
30
Cant really help. My T's eat anything that moves, regardless of how many times they've already eaten. My Chaco will grab and eat them one by one. My LP will grab all that come by, and eats them all at the same time. If you want to watch something eat like a pig, get an LP (or a pig) - lol.
 

x Mr Awesome x

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
449
This tends to work for my terrestrials pretty well. Drop the cricket directly in front of the business end of the t. A lot of the time they'll grab the prey item without taking the time to decode of they want it or not. I've noticed if the cricket is just walking around naturally a lot of the time my t will ignore it. No real advice for arboreals though.
 

Shaka

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 25, 2010
Messages
17
Something I have tried is if a T is really stubborn and won't eat, I put it in a cooler room for a few days or a week, and then back to the warm room, this usually gets their appetites going.

Shaka
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
733
Agreed Terry and I've noticed lately this year around times of molt weather patterns and barometric pressure almost seems to trigger various inherent things within my captive collection.

I swear with an upcoming few days of rain and lower than normal barometric pressures I've had T's in premolt for weeks decided now was the time to properly molt. Very interested in tracking more of this over time but one could see with lower pressures an "easier" molt.

This also begs the question as to the effects of either very low pressures, say below sea level as conversely higher than normal pressures such as say Denver above sea level. Do T's bred and raised say in Denver find it easier to molt if they were then to be shipped to a home in much lower over all pressures?

Good stuff to think about! :)
Richard, It seems lately I'm late replying and not following up with discussion well. I've been busy with work, work and more! {D...... certainly not complaining.

Yes, this molting scenario you're describing sounds spot on. Do you find that most molts occur after a front passes or prior? Most activity in my experience has been during a steady rise from low pressure as front approaching or moving through- but haven't kept track lately. Activity mostly decreases after it passes.

Never pondered the effects on molting from difference in pressure related to sea level- but you might be onto something with that. Keep us updated. :)

Terry
 
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