What to Get Next?

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,058
I am thinking of getting another tarantula. I currently have these five:

2x (0-2-0) Avicularia avicularia
2x (0-2-0) Grammostola pulchra
1x (0-0-1) Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens

My ideal tarantula would be:
  • not medically significant
  • not a pet hole
  • active
  • good feeding response
  • hardy
  • easy to care for

Some species on my wish list (that I can get locally):
  • Acanthoscurria geniculata
  • Aphonopelma seemanni
  • Brachypelma emilia
  • Bumbla cabocla
  • Grammostola pulchripes

I'm open to other suggestions too, but I'd like to be able to get one locally.
 
Last edited:

Paiige

Arachnobaron
Joined
Oct 2, 2016
Messages
331
I'd say B emilia! They're gorgeous and everyone needs a Brachy. Or jump on the G pulchripes train that we've all been on lately :D
 

SausageinaNet

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
33
A.geniculata is everything you are looking for. They almost never hide, they eat like pigs, they aren't hard to care for and their bite might hurt but their venom isn't that bad from what you can read. Also they can get pretty large which is often attractive to new people in the hobby.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,058
@Casey K is a member here that sells and is located in Spartanburg SC. She may be able to help you out locally.
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/inventory-cut.289797/
Good to know!

I live only a few miles away from Pinchers & Pokies, so I can pick them up in person with no long trip. :happy:

A.geniculata is everything you are looking for. They almost never hide, they eat like pigs, they aren't hard to care for and their bite might hurt but their venom isn't that bad from what you can read. Also they can get pretty large which is often attractive to new people in the hobby.
I'm not too worried about bites. However, I know they have itchy hairs. How feasible is it to avoid feeling the effects of those?

My other question is cage maintenance. For example, I read on another thread where someone was advised to cover or remove the geniculata before removing a water dish for cleaning. Is that necessary? If so, that's probably more of a hassle than I want to sign up for right now. If, on the other hand, I can use long tongs to extract the water dish (the way I do for my other terrestrials), that's doable.

Tongs can be used to remove dead crickets, molts, and other debris. For heavier-duty maintenance like removing/cleaning a water dish or hide or changing substrate, wear disposable gloves to protect your hands from stray hairs in the enclosure - and only reach in after the spider is safely covered in a catch-cup or has been removed from the enclosure.
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,675
Good to know!

I live only a few miles away from Pinchers & Pokies, so I can pick them up in person with no long trip. :happy:



I'm not too worried about bites. However, I know they have itchy hairs. How feasible is it to avoid feeling the effects of those?

My other question is cage maintenance. For example, I read on another thread where someone was advised to cover or remove the geniculata before removing a water dish for cleaning. Is that necessary? If so, that's probably more of a hassle than I want to sign up for right now. If, on the other hand, I can use long tongs to extract the water dish (the way I do for my other terrestrials), that's doable.
A.geniculata moves towards everything moving, since that could be food. Cupping it temporarily can help, but you could also feed it first, then do maintenance. It really has everything on your list.
B.emelia as well, but they can be flicky.
But really, any of the list you provided is a good choice. I don't have experience with B.cabocla, but i hear they are fun to keep.
G.pulchra is another good one.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,360
I am thinking of getting another tarantula. I currently have these five:

2x (0-2-0) Avicularia avicularia
2x (0-2-0) Grammostola pulchra
1x (0-0-1) Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens

My ideal tarantula would be:
  • not medically significant
  • not a pet hole
  • active
  • good feeding response
  • hardy
  • easy to care for

Some species on my wish list (that I can get locally):
  • Acanthoscurria geniculata
  • Aphonopelma seemanni
  • Brachypelma emilia
  • Bumbla cabocla
  • Grammostola pulchripes

I'm open to other suggestions too, but I'd like to be able to get one locally.
You own 2 pet rocks (pulchra), so another Grammo or Brachy while looking different will generally be the same as the pulchra for the commonly kept species out of those 2 genera.

If you want something a little different, you could get the "mini-GBB" below, the NICE thing about them, they lack urticating setae!
Dolichothele diamantinensis
 

chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 27, 2010
Messages
2,177
My other question is cage maintenance. For example, I read on another thread where someone was advised to cover or remove the geniculata before removing a water dish for cleaning. Is that necessary? If so, that's probably more of a hassle than I want to sign up for right now. If, on the other hand, I can use long tongs to extract the water dish (the way I do for my other terrestrials), that's doable.
I wouldn't recommend using tongs to extract something heavy like a water dish. It seems like it would be too easy for it to slip and fall back into the tank, possibly crushing your spider. My genic isn't too hard to take care of. If I start poking around in the tank with tongs, she usually scoots into her hide. (It not, I can easily give her a little nudge in the right direction.) Once she's in the hide, it's easy to block the opening and then I can reach in to remove the water dish, add substrate, or do whatever else is needed.
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
205
I am thinking of getting another tarantula. I currently have these five:

2x (0-2-0) Avicularia avicularia
2x (0-2-0) Grammostola pulchra
1x (0-0-1) Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens

My ideal tarantula would be:
  • not medically significant
  • not a pet hole
  • active
  • good feeding response
  • hardy
  • easy to care for

Some species on my wish list (that I can get locally):
  • Acanthoscurria geniculata
  • Aphonopelma seemanni
  • Brachypelma emilia
  • Bumbla cabocla
  • Grammostola pulchripes

I'm open to other suggestions too, but I'd like to be able to get one locally.
A geniculate all the way! Nice colour, great feeding response, always active & gets to a nice size. Mine is my favourite T!
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
205
I am thinking of getting another tarantula. I currently have these five:

2x (0-2-0) Avicularia avicularia
2x (0-2-0) Grammostola pulchra
1x (0-0-1) Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens

My ideal tarantula would be:
  • not medically significant
  • not a pet hole
  • active
  • good feeding response
  • hardy
  • easy to care for

Some species on my wish list (that I can get locally):
  • Acanthoscurria geniculata
  • Aphonopelma seemanni
  • Brachypelma emilia
  • Bumbla cabocla
  • Grammostola pulchripes

I'm open to other suggestions too, but I'd like to be able to get one locally.
What about a GBB? I know its not on your list but could be worth looking into?
 

dopamine

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 7, 2010
Messages
341
I'm currently deep in a Haplopelma (Cyriopagopus :penguin:) addiction. They're all i want :hungry:.
 

scott308

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 6, 2008
Messages
74
I'm currently deep in a Haplopelma (Cyriopagopus :penguin:) addiction. They're all i want :hungry:.
Not very helpful to the OP, however. I would definitely not recommend this genus for the OP based on their current collection and the requirements listed. I also would not suggest an OBT either, although I don't know if the person who did so meant it seriously or in jest.
 

scott308

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 6, 2008
Messages
74
I wouldn't recommend using tongs to extract something heavy like a water dish. It seems like it would be too easy for it to slip and fall back into the tank, possibly crushing your spider. My genic isn't too hard to take care of. If I start poking around in the tank with tongs, she usually scoots into her hide. (It not, I can easily give her a little nudge in the right direction.) Once she's in the hide, it's easy to block the opening and then I can reach in to remove the water dish, add substrate, or do whatever else is needed.
It depends on what is being used for the water dish. I use caps or disposable plastic cups, so everything is light and easy to remove with forceps. If you are using something bigger and heavier then you would definitely not want to risk using forceps.
 
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