What substrate

tristan4033

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Mar 16, 2017
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Ok this is going to be a noob question but I'm getting an avic. Avic in a few days and was wondering what substrate to use, I heard coconut fiber molds easy when there is any moisture at all, idk because I keep my Arizona blonde substrate bone dry. Does anybody have any recommendations about which sub. To use
 

Venom1080

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ask 10 keepers youre going to get 5 different answers. ;) topsoil is very popular but i hate it, eco earth is also popular but is expensive and molds like all hell, peat moss is relatively cheap but doesnt absorb water very well.

i use a mix of eco earth and peat moss. 70% P. moss 30% eco earth. i find that works best for me.

Avics are most easily kept on dry substrate, theres alot of misinformation out there about humidity, never follow an online care sheet.
 

Hellblazer

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Just keep the water dish full, give it good ventilation, and don't worry about the humidity level.
 

bryverine

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Then how should I keep the humidity up and what should the humidity be then would 60-70 percent work
For the love of your new spider, do not soak this cage!

Avics thrive with a large water dish and LOTS of ventilation... heck I dont know when I last wet the substrate beyond a bowl overflow every month or so. Don't go for specific numbers, don't use hygrometers, don't make a swamp.

How big is it going to be?

Oh, to answer your first question, I just do the brick stuff. Only place I've seen mold is my C. lividum and M. robustum enclosures.
 

tristan4033

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I know you shouldn't buy them but This is one of the few well maintained petcos where they actually take proper care of their animals, it's one of those tarantula huts
 

EulersK

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I know you shouldn't buy them but This is one of the few well maintained petcos where they actually take proper care of their animals, it's one of those tarantula huts
The tarantula huts, by design, are not taking proper care of the animal. First and foremost, they house terrestrial tarantulas in them which can lead to injury. Even beyond that, everything is wrong even for an arboreal. The "substrate" is just foam, there is no hide, often no leaves, not enough ventilation for an avic, the food provided (often shipped with the sling) is often larger than the sling, and the enclosure is usually absolutely massive for the sling.

Ignore literally 100% of anything they told you. Perhaps some of it is right, but we can't sift through it. Read this guide by @viper69, follow it, and please ask questions. Avic slings are fragile and die fairly easily for a new keeper. They're not impossible to keep, but we do see a lot of "My dead avic" threads around here.
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/avicularia-husbandry.282549/#post-2461396
 

tristan4033

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It's not a sling it's a juvenile and I would say it's an adult based on its size, it is I would say 3-4 inches
 

Ungoliant

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Ok this is going to be a noob question but I'm getting an avic. Avic in a few days and was wondering what substrate to use, I heard coconut fiber molds easy when there is any moisture at all, idk because I keep my Arizona blonde substrate bone dry. Does anybody have any recommendations about which sub. To use
A good starter substrate is coconut fiber (coir), peat, or some mixture thereof. Be sure what you get does not include pesticides, fungicides, or fertilizers, as these may be toxic.

I have never had a mold problem.


It's not a sling it's a juvenile and I would say it's an adult based on its size, it is I would say 3-4 inches
It is hardy enough at that size, but getting it into a proper enclosure should be your first priority. Ignore anything Petco (or the Tarantula Hut label) says about how to care for tarantulas.

Personally, I keep my Avic substrate dry (and just supply a large "arboreal" water dish), but I also live in a humid climate. If you live in a dry climate, you can moisten part of the substrate a bit to raise humidity. (Do not make it wet, just a slightly damp.) To reduce the risk of mold, let the substrate dry out before adding more moisture.

If you don't think your Avic is drinking from her dish, you can drip some water onto the web, but please do not spray the tarantula itself; they hate that.

The important thing is ventilation. A lot of Avics die when, in an attempt to reach some arbitrary humidity reading, new keepers restrict ventilation. As has already been said, you do not need a hygrometer (many of the cheap ones are inaccurate anyway), and you don't need to worry about maintaining relative humidity within a specific range.
 

viper69

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Belegnole

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I am currently using a 50/50 topsoil/peet mix. As I live in a very dry area in the winter I overflow the water bowl once a week.
 

darkness975

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I don't have issues with coco fiber molding even in moist enclosures. Mold issues tend to come from left over boluses or parts of prey items that go unnoticed and end up turning foul. Stuffy cages without proper ventilation can also contribute to mold outbreaks.
 

cold blood

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Then how should I keep the humidity up and what should the humidity be then would 60-70 percent work
OMG, forget that crap!!!

No t on the planet as a number specific humidity requirement. In fact, humidity is basically meaningless and only serves to confuse people. When you read humidity, think moisture in the substrate....that said, avics have no humidity requirement, it would be more accurate to say that they have ventilation requirements, as venting is far more important. The #1 avic killer is damp, stuffy cages.

I've been keeping ts for 16 years, never once have I measured humidity numbers or cared to...its irrelevant to keeping.....ts that require moisture simply require damp substrate, the ambient humidity in your area will dictate how much water you add to the enclosure as well as how often.

I use top soil, for me its the best choice....It seems to be resistant to mites and I never have mold issues (take that @Venom1080 ). The only other sub I use is peat moss...its very light and its acidity does prohibit mold growth.
 
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