What species of tarantulas are considered more desirable as a male rather than female?

Zoghbi

Arachnopeon
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Sep 18, 2010
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Are there any T's out there where the male of the species outshines the female as far as the general keeper would be concerned? When does what he brings to the table trump her longevity and "fat bottom"? Yes it is my favorite song by Queen!
 

demasoni521

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Dec 11, 2010
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As far as longevity goes...I don't think there is any species where the male tarantula outlives the female. I guess that's just how nature works out. The males of the members of the Pamphobeteus (sp) species are much more brightly colored than the females, however.
I think that the female tarantula is always more desired than the male, just because of the longer lifespan. Just my $0.02
 

gromgrom

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As far as longevity goes...I don't think there is any species where the male tarantula outlives the female. I guess that's just how nature works out. The males of the members of the Pamphobeteus (sp) species are much more brightly colored than the females, however.
I think that the female tarantula is always more desired than the male, just because of the longer lifespan. Just my $0.02
plus, in some cases, (P. imirnia), the females look strikingly better. no comparison.
 

Zoghbi

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Sep 18, 2010
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Thank you!

Yes, species where the male is more colorful is kind of where I was going with the question. I was not sure if there were any other categories where a male would be preferable to the female. I definitely understand the longevity and stockiness of the females. Is there any credence to the rumor that males are any more "aggressive" than females?
 
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ornamentalist

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Oct 2, 2010
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phormictopus males go more purplish than the females. But what they giveth with one hand they taketh away with the other, some show nice colouration after their penultimate moult but bear in mind it is living on borrowed time when it matures. Another prime example is the A. versicolor, the males are much more striking. The x immanis males are awesome. The male p. Metallica is much darker blue than the female, our mm is navy, but looks different in different lights, anyway theres no competition with the females colours of the gooty

---------- Post added at 04:44 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:42 AM ----------

i find the males to be more defensive yes, my a. avic bares fangs when you disturb him and my metallica nails everything you try to usher him with
 

Zoghbi

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Sep 18, 2010
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ornamentalist- you have mentioned a couple that I had heard of and some more that were new to me. Thank you. Keep in touch!

---------- Post added at 12:51 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:49 AM ----------

yes, borrowed time when the males mature... this is what I keep trying to tell my wife!
 

Pociemon

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Yes, species where the male is more colorful is kind of where I was going with the question. I was not sure if there were any other categories where a male would be preferable to the female. I definitely understand the longevity and stockiness of the females. Is there any credence to the rumor that males are any more "aggressive" than females?
When the males mature some of them are more quick to bite. But not true on every mature male, but it is probably because in nature they are more exposed to predators when they go out and search for females. But not all males are. I have mature males of hapopelma hainanum and haplopelma schmidti, hainanum males are very quick to bite, but schmidti males are pretty calm, but i cant tell why! ust my experience;)
 

skippy

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A male E pachypus is more desirable simply because they are so rare to come across as the females are more likely to be collected due to their size. Same thing with a number of trapdoor sp I am told.

It's hard to breed them without a male =(
 

ornamentalist

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Huh??? Please explain; other than size (and the obvious palps) my male and female appear nearly identical.
mm versis are usually brighter than the females, mine puts the females to shame. Even robc on you tube explains how his mm versi is much more striking that the females, and that its a shame the males of this genus are more colourful. They are the same colour, dont get me wrong, but males are much deeper purple. Cant think why yours is identical to your female.
 

Ceratogyrus

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A male E pachypus is more desirable simply because they are so rare to come across as the females are more likely to be collected due to their size. Same thing with a number of trapdoor sp I am told.

It's hard to breed them without a male =(
Dont know if its case overseas, but here in south africa, there seems to be lots of female P.muticus but not many males. Would swop 1 of my females for a male at this stage.
 

skippy

Arachnoangel
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Dont know if its case overseas, but here in south africa, there seems to be lots of female P.muticus but not many males. Would swop 1 of my females for a male at this stage.
P muticus is readily available as slings here afaik, E pachypus is WC pretty exclusively i think so they tend to concentrate on the females.

for aesthetics alone i would go with pamphobeteus sp, phormictopus sp, theraphosa apophysis... there are others i'm sure but those are the ones that come to mind at the moment.
 
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