What species is tis scorpion?

Reitz

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2003
Messages
339
I'm fairly confident that the scorpion pictured is a sub-adult (possibly adult) Tityus serrulatus. The picture isn't very revealing, but given your location and the patterning on the scorp, along with the stripes and thickness of its metasoma, that would be my best guess. Assuming, of couse, that you collected the scorpion locally.

Peace,
Chris
 

Neo

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 9, 2003
Messages
145
Some sort of fat tail scorpion. African Fat Tail? I don't know taking a guess, not a professional at this. AFT don't totally look like that.

:?
 

ORION_DV8

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 3, 2003
Messages
331
Can you get a picture of the telson/sting it might be easier to distinguish.
ORION
 

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
pictures

well i´ll try to put another pictures here, they are not very good cos´ i used a webcam...
 

Attachments

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
picture

There was this guy at the college who told me that it was a Tityus serrulatus, i´ve collected it in my house, and it is one and a half inches long (kind of...).
 

Attachments

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
pic

actually I´ve collected it in the wall of my bedroom, behind the door. Scorpions usually climb walls? (The walls of my bedroom have that wallpapers) And, how dangerous is it, since it have come into my room and climbed my walls?
 

Attachments

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
picture

Oh, does anybody knows what could be the best preys for it?
Considering it is a little scorp (4 to 5 centimeters, 1 to 2 inches)...
I´ve given it a cricket, wich was completely swallowed... :eek: well, i didn´t see any residue of it but the head, and i´ve seen it eating the leg o the cricket... i´m pretty sure of that... Is that possible too?
 

Attachments

chau0046

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
477
My friend ...Living in Brazil you have one of the unique opportunities to enjoy the scorp in its native suroundings. It might sound dull...But this scorp is highly prized , most scorpion collecters have a great deal of difficulty to purchase these in North america. Since the borders closed on brazil for exporting..There almost never seen in our pet trade.

They also reproduce by themselves./ No M/F bs.

Pretty crazy ....

Enjoy!!!!
Mat
 

chau0046

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
477
I think its a 3 on a scale of five.

Not toooo too bad, but you `ll feel it!

Mat
 

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
$$$$$

All right! hehehe
I think i´ve found a gold mine in my own house!
I´ll start to export some of them ilegally!!!
hehehehehehe
Well, about the advantages in Brazil, there aren´t as many as you told, the natural ambient of this scorp is the city drain, and about having them, you can be arrested if you get caught. But... I think I´ll take the risk cos´ it´s something i really like!
 

Reitz

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2003
Messages
339
As I said in my first post, it's a Tityus serrulatus.

I'm guessing its got one more molt to go, though it could be done.

In terms of the cricket--yes, it ate the whole thing. They pre-digest food, that is to say that they break down food before they swallow it. By the time the cricket was "swallowed" it was liquid, and took up much less space than an intact cricket.

Crickets are probably the best food for your scorp. You should be able to find small ones, which will be less likely to injure your pet.

As for the venom, I'm not entirely sure. Mat said that they're about a 3, I'd go with between 3 and 4. I'm fairly sure that their venom is powerful, but that they can't inject a significant amount. The result of the sting would probably be lots of pain and some systemic effects--it would most likely feel like you were hit in the groin for about 4 days.

In terms of climbing walls, no must scorps can't, but most Tityus sp. can. Esp ones that small.

Hope that helps,
Chris
 

Reitz

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 12, 2003
Messages
339
Did you say you can get arrested for having a scorpion in your possesion in Brazil?
 

chau0046

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
477
Yeah! Sorry Chris you were definately right on youre ID!

Good job!

Mat

Maybe some day i will receive these ...heheh
 

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
Thanx

(Oh, sorry about my english, i´m not very good on that, and i´ll try to be as "understandable" as I can...
Well, one day I get a scorp, then I start keeping it, search for information, find this site, ask some questions and I receive a Library back! hehehehe. Chis, Mat, thanks very much, you are great and helped me a lot. I´m even thinking in increase my "collection" of scorps! hehehe
About being arrested... It´s illegal to keep ANY kind of animal of the brazilian fauna, I think they don´t care too tooo much about scorps, you can get a penalty (very expensive), but many kinds of mammals, reptiles and birds lead you directly to the jail...
Thanks again...
:)
 

Frank

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
474
I wish I could live where I could be surrounded by scorpions, instead of mosquitos...



Frank
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
707
I wouldn't exactly call it a "gold mine". Not very many people would be willing to risk going to jail for importation of a scorpion. Tityus serrulatus is indeed the ID, as Chris had stated. Do you have any pictures of other scorpions of the area? If so, please send some to my e-mail (reminder that you already have the address). ...hugs.

adios,
edw. :D
 

ThiagoMassa

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2003
Messages
112
Sorry

Sorry Edw, I only have this pictures, I´ll try to find a site or another sources for the pictures...

Hugs
Massa
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 6, 2003
Messages
707
I have photos of T. bahiensis, but I only have them of a single subspecies and would prefer to know the color variants of each subspecies. Don't worry about researching for photos of them because I've been doing that for a few years and have only come up with a single color variant, take T. serrulatus, which I have pics of two different subspecies. I don't believe I have any photos of T. costatus at all, but I'll have to search through my photo files to know for sure. It would be nice if you have any available means of finding pics of that species.


thanks & adios,
edw. :D
 
Top