What kind of stick bugs are these?

Pssh

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
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197
what makes you think they are that species? I was thinking that these were north american since the owner said she found them.
 

joshuai

Arachnoangel
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Oct 10, 2008
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Do they have little horns on there heads? If so i would say they are Vietnamese stick bugs or Medauroidea extradentata as mentioned above!
 

Balkastalkman

Arachnosquire
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Feb 19, 2010
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I have a large number of juvies that I hatched . Yours looks exactly exactly the same to mine... They should have 2 very very small horns on their heads.

The devil horn stick has a great potential of being an invasive species so there is a good possibility of there being some wild populations in the US right now...
 

What

Arachnoprince
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The devil horn stick has a great potential of being an invasive species so there is a good possibility of there being some wild populations in the US right now...
These are actually at pest status here in some areas of California where they literally are destroying people's ivy(I have been told that in Newport some people go out at night with scissors and kill the sticks they can find with a flashlight)...

Also probably not a good idea to be talking about your sticks, these are still technically illegal and as far as I know you can get in trouble for keeping these, even with how widespread they are in the USA. Come on people... these are public forums.
 

Balkastalkman

Arachnosquire
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Also probably not a good idea to be talking about your sticks, these are still technically illegal and as far as I know you can get in trouble for keeping these, even with how widespread they are in the USA. Come on people... these are public forums.
I dont think anyone is going to track me down to take my stickbugs lol.... I Know they are illegal. I think I could get in trouble for shipping them to customers in florida or cali ect... They reproduce asexually so they really have to potential for invasive wild populations to explode.
 

What

Arachnoprince
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I dont think anyone is going to track me down to take my stickbugs lol.... I Know they are illegal.
Members have had the USDA show up on their doorsteps requesting specific bugs... Its sad but true.
 

Matt K

Arachnoangel
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I have personally encountered USDA officials, and have had them show up at my doorstep, and have been contacted by another who read this forum and asked me about another member.

You better believe they occasionally read these threads.
 

bugmankeith

Arachnoking
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Jun 4, 2006
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Does anyone sell Northern Walkingsticks, (their native to where I live).
Everyone pays attention to the non-native threads but when I ask for something legal nobody responds, geez!
 

Pssh

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
197
These dont seem to have the little spikey type things on their middle legs.
 

Pssh

Arachnoknight
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Nov 12, 2010
Messages
197
Not really spikes, but those flat little bump things. they look like little notches in the "wood" of the stick. I have confirmation that they are indeed the annam sticks.

There probably aren't any males around are there? Just females roaming free in CA?
 

Balkastalkman

Arachnosquire
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Feb 19, 2010
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Not really spikes, but those flat little bump things. they look like little notches in the "wood" of the stick. I have confirmation that they are indeed the annam sticks.

There probably aren't any males around are there? Just females roaming free in CA?
This species can reproduce asexualy through parthenogenesis. Males are very very rare in even native habitats.
 

Bugs In Cyberspace

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
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Dec 10, 2006
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Come on, these don't eat ivy. Even the USDA knows that! (Don't worry, they only visit forums or pet stores when a forum member makes a big deal about it and reports it for the sake of proving a ridiculous point about blanket regulations vs. a species that has been in the US hobby for a couple of decades with no history of establishment).

M. extradentata have "horns or spikes" on their heads, most notably at maturity. Yours are still immatures. The flanges on their legs become more pronounced as they grow. They are sometimes called Annams or Vietnamese.

I am quite curious though. Your friend said she found them. Where did she find them? A ditched culture that lasts a generation or two in the wild is not the same thing as a thriving, spreading population. More and more people seem to be finding them on ebay.

Enjoy your bugs, but don't ship them or let them go outdoors.
 

What

Arachnoprince
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Come on, these don't eat ivy. Even the USDA knows that!
I will admit, I was mixing up my introduced species when I mentioned the ivy thing, but C. morosus(the species I meant) definitely does and definitely is established in Newport Beach, CA. :)

The speculation in the article about them being introduced by a keeper is idiotic though...AFAIK they are believed to have been brought in on plants or in soil.
 

Pssh

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
197
I'm not sure where she found them, but I have noticed a lot of people in her area have them (and a few say they find them on their rose bushes.)
 
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