What is your most surprising T? (atypical behavior)

nicodimus22

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Do you have one T that acts completely different than the typical specimens of that species? Like a super-defensive Euathlus species red...an OBT that is completely docile...an arboreal that acts like a fossorial...a GBB that barely webs. Weird stuff like that. Let us know.
 

Leila

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Yeah. A Brachypelma albopilosum who kicks setae like a mad woman.
She has yet to get me though. But there is just something charming about a feisty little fuzzball. :cat::cat:
 

GreyPsyche

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P. Muticus, very active, out very often. Although she's still fairly young. She's also been more lethargic lately and super far, probably in PreMolt.

Other than that, nope. All are pretty typical.
 

JoshDM020

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Funny you'd mention the GBB, mine barely has anything webbed other than the corkbark he only leaves when he gets scared of literally anything. Its thick and pretty webbing, but not very expansive.
 

Ungoliant

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Do you have one T that acts completely different than the typical specimens of that species?
My 2.25" Grammostola pulchra (Flash) is extremely timid. She seals herself into her hide even when she is not in pre-molt. I only see her when I open a tiny window to do a welfare check and feed her.
 

Nightstalker47

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I have an LP, who doesn't kick hairs...
I have 5 L.parahybana,
3 unsexed juveniles and two mature specimens, all were raised from slings, in all these years they have never kicked at me. From what I've experienced they rarely kick at all, you would have to really mess with them to trigger that. I don't think they are typically that prone to kicking, although individuals vary...

My B.albiceps has been the opposite of whats expected from her species, she's grown from 3/4 inch to 2 inches in a matter of months and she never refuses a meal. I was expecting a slow growing specimen but was happily surprised to get something different ;)

I also have a fearless P.sazimai that comes towards me when I open her enclosure, maybe she just knows she's getting fed but its cool to see that kind of behaviour from a young T.
 

WeightedAbyss75

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Feb 22, 2014
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Not sure if this is common or not, but it seems weird. My almost 5" P. cancerides is very skittish and very reclusive, only coming out of its huge hide late at night. Any disturbance and it bolts right back into the hide. Great eater, does well, just stinks it isn't really out for display like I would have thought :D Super pretty ;)
 

The Grym Reaper

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It seems that I'm the oddball T whisperer, I have a P. irminia that is pretty docile and out often, a P. cambridgei that is a stupidly skittish ghost, a non-skittish GBB, and...

You know where I'm going with this...

This lovely young lady.
View media item 38839
 

mconnachan

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I have 5 L.parahybana,
3 unsexed juveniles and two mature specimens, all were raised from slings, in all these years they have never kicked at me. From what I've experienced they rarely kick at all, you would have to really mess with them to trigger that. I don't think they are typically that prone to kicking, although individuals vary...
My old LP from years ago was the same, never kicked setae ever, at that time I wasn't aware of their typical behaviour, when I told a colleague he couldn't believe it, his was as bald as a coot.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Is that a B. hamorri threat posturing, wow, never in my life...
Yeah, it seems that she cast off her manners along with her exoskeleton when she last moulted, what makes it funnier is that she used to be my most docile T prior to that.
 

PanzoN88

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Sep 15, 2014
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My late female GBB was extremely docile like both of my E. Sp. red. And GBBs are usually very skittish, she was a monster, but she was a very mellow one, unless you are a cricket or superworm then you have no chance of survival.
 

Walker253

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Jun 12, 2016
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I had a completely mellow and handleable H gigas. My LP has never kicked a hair, and my P irminia rarely if ever hides
 

johnny quango

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May 17, 2013
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My adult female Pamphobeteus sp mascara as never kicked hair or threat posed unlike my other Pamphobeteus.
Also my Gbb is so chilled out I often think it's not a gbb just something else completely
 

TyjTheMighty

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Feb 15, 2017
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I have an N chromatus that will NOT eat in front of me. She's afraid of her food ._. I also have an N carapoensis that's pretty sweet and docile :3
 

Nightstalker47

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It seems that I'm the oddball T whisperer, I have a P. irminia that is pretty docile and out often, a P. cambridgei that is a stupidly skittish ghost, a non-skittish GBB, and...

You know where I'm going with this...

This lovely young lady.
View media item 38839
Prime example of how much individuals can differ within a species. It's funny that you always end up with the oddballs, at this rate you mineswell get a P.murinus, we all know how it's going to turn out ;)
 

CWilson1351

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Jan 23, 2017
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Let's see, my GBB spends 95% of the time in the hide, my P. sazimai "greets" me occasionally and attacks/runs from/attacks again her water, and my P. fasciata just sits behind the cork bark content any time I open the enclosure. Only my Avic and G. pulchripes seem "normal" to me. Only one that bothers me is rarely seeing the GBB, maybe the occasional paranoia that the Pokie is just waiting for the right time to bolt lol
 
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