What is this? Identification pls.

Abdulkarim Elnaas

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
108
Can someone please tell me what type of centipede this is?

It was in my backyard under some bricks.
 

Scoly

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 4, 2013
Messages
422
It's often impossible to id a centipede on coloration alone, you need to look at other features such as antennae, terminal legs, and spiracles.

Based on your location, Libya (which you really should mention in your post if you expect people to identify a centipede) I would say this is either a S. morsitans or S. cingulata as either can look like this on the surface (unless someone else here can positively identify it based on what is visible).

Do you intend to keep it?
 

Abdulkarim Elnaas

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
108
It's often impossible to id a centipede on coloration alone, you need to look at other features such as antennae, terminal legs, and spiracles.

Based on your location, Libya (which you really should mention in your post if you expect people to identify a centipede) I would say this is either a S. morsitans or S. cingulata as either can look like this on the surface (unless someone else here can positively identify it based on what is visible).

Do you intend to keep it?
Sorry about the location, I was considering putting that in a reply but for some reason decided against it. I live in a rural area in Tripoli, Libya.

I'm afraid that my father made short work of it. "It was venomous" and all, you know how it goes. Tbh, I probably wouldn't have kept it anyways. I can hold a snake and maybe even a spider but a snake-spider is just too much raw terror. I might have relocated it though.

Here are some more pictures:


Also, I don't know if it helps, but the little squares on the plastic are approximately 2.5cm x 2.5cm
 

Robert123456

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Messages
95
It sure looks like an S. cingulata but hey, you cant be 100% just by looking at a picture, so dont take my word for it, and I think I would have kept it I find them really interesting, and whatever it was its beautiful!
 

Abdulkarim Elnaas

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
108
It does look pretty cool and I'm already regretting not keeping it. I think its pretty big too. In the photos I took it wasn't even streched out and it easily makes 8cm.
 

Staehilomyces

Arachnoprince
Joined
Mar 2, 2016
Messages
1,447
Just for reference, the main reasons I believe that to be a cingulata is that morsitans have longer terminals with more prominent spikes. They're also a little less robust, and have a head that shows the "fangs" a little clearer. Trust me, you notice these sorts of things when you handle your morsitans for over an hour practically every day :)
 

Robert123456

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Messages
95
Just for reference, the main reasons I believe that to be a cingulata is that morsitans have longer terminals with more prominent spikes. They're also a little less robust, and have a head that shows the "fangs" a little clearer. Trust me, you notice these sorts of things when you handle your morsitans for over an hour practically every day :)
Thats a beautiful morsitan! Im thinking of getting one soon enough
 

Robert123456

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Messages
95
You talking about the pede in the photo? If so, that's not a morsitans. I was talking about the difference between morsitans and cingulata.
I was referring to the one from your picture, if its not a morsitan, what is it? (Ive never owned one so i just been doing research)
 

Scoly

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 4, 2013
Messages
422
Just for reference, the main reasons I believe that to be a cingulata is that morsitans have longer terminals with more prominent spikes. They're also a little less robust, and have a head that shows the "fangs" a little clearer. Trust me, you notice these sorts of things when you handle your morsitans for over an hour practically every day :)
Fair shout. I hadn't even factored in the body shape, but yes, I do remember my morsitans being quite slender, where my cingulatas are quite chunky, though some more than others. How's your handling going? Been bit yet?
 

Scoly

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 4, 2013
Messages
422
I'm afraid that my father made short work of it. "It was venomous" and all, you know how it goes. Tbh, I probably wouldn't have kept it anyways. I can hold a snake and maybe even a spider but a snake-spider is just too much raw terror. I might have relocated it though.
Well next time, tell your father these are not all that venomous, not as bad as the scorpions you get where you are. As for keeping it, most owners never hold theirs at all. But if you do decide to keep the next one, make sure you read up on their care first.
 

Abdulkarim Elnaas

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
108
Yesterday morning I lifted a tile in my backyard (I make a habit of doing that cuz sometimes there are interesting reptiles underneath) and I found like four baby centipedes. I also found something tiny that looked like a baby scorpion, except that it had no visible stinger. Unfortunately, that night when I came back to collect them there was only one baby centipede and it got away fast.
 

Robert123456

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 8, 2016
Messages
95
RIP :I
My old man (the person who found it) wasn't sure how venomous it was and he wanted to play it safe, especially since I have little siblings messing around in the backyard all the time.
I understand his point of view, but still, I feel so sad :( it was a beautiful specimen
 

Abdulkarim Elnaas

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
108
Dudes, this morning I was looking for some local crickets in my backyard to start a cricket colony when I ran into an interesting (I think baby) pede. It was a few centimeters long with many legs (maybe a hundred or more) even though it was only like 3 millimeters wide. Luckily, I'd already made a centipede jar (since there seemed to be so many pedes around my house all of a sudden) and I just picked the little guy up with some of his dirt and put him in the jar.
Later on I found another normal looking young centipede but decided against putting it in the jar cuz I don't think it would stand a chance.
After that I found some clumps of grass roots that I think would work really well as substrate. When I take the old dirt out of the jar to put in the roots, I'll try and snap a few photos of the centipede - cuz right now most of him is underground in the jar.

Also, there are no pinhead crickets (or any crickets, for that matter) being sold in Libya (and my colony has only 5 or 6 members as of today :p) so do you guys have any ideas for things I could try to feed it?
 
Last edited:

Abdulkarim Elnaas

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 15, 2016
Messages
108
eRWYQBM.jpg mj2cpQR.jpg p8nCIWt.jpg W1vgznS.jpg yAF6ued.jpg Here is the centipede I was talking about.

It is around 11.4 cm long when stretching, even though it is only a few mm wide.
If it is still a baby, I really want to see how it looks as an adult.

Is it a baby? Can someone ID it?
 
Last edited:
Top