what is the size for a t, container wise?

Gillian

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Aug 13, 2002
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Hi all,
I'll be transferring my non-eating chalcodes to a smaller container, in the hopes she'll eat. I've tried everything, and every kind of presentation. Is the container size to be her leg span?
Peace,
Gillian
 

Nixy

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I hope the more experienced can tell ya more.
But I keep my adults in split ten gallon aquareums. When Willy grows up all the way she's going to have a full ten gallon. But the Rosies, chevron, usambar and zebra seem happy in their five gallon space. I keep our 1-2 1/2 juvies in two gallon converted cheeseball tubs. And our half inch slings are kept in 1 1/2 cup tupperwear square snack containers.

All ours eat good and Seem happy and content with the setups.

Hope this helped Gillian and good luck.
 

atavuss

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Aug 16, 2002
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Originally posted by Gillian
Hi all,
I'll be transferring my non-eating chalcodes to a smaller container, in the hopes she'll eat. I've tried everything, and every kind of presentation. Is the container size to be her leg span?
Peace,
Gillian
I use large kritter keepers for most adult t's.........my chalcodes is in a ten gallon reptile style terrarium with a foamarium.
Ed
 

Gillian

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My chalcodes is in a Tupperware, 18 inches long, 6 inches high and deep. She's about 4 inches. (It probably would have been helpful, had I said that, at the onset..sorry) Thanks for all the help, everyone..:)
Peace,
Gillian
 

belewfripp

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Aug 17, 2002
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The size of the container I use varies depending on the size and activity of the spider. I have an adult female G. rosea that hardly moves at all, and as such she is kept in one of the smaller size Pet Pals, approx. 4 1/2 in. wide, 8 in. long and 6 in. tall. Smaller spiders that are more active actually get larger containers. Spiders that burrow extensively get the smallest tank that provides 4-6 in. of substrate depth and 1 1/2 to 2 times their legspan in length because they can effectively create "extra" floorspace by burrowing. One of my cobalts is in a smaller size tank but has effectively double the floorspace due to an "upstairs" and a "downstairs". I don't subscribe to big, tall tanks for arboreals and instead give them tanks that are about 1 to 1 1/2 times the spider's legspan in height.


So, in general, for me the spiders that get the smallest tanks are either young or very sedentary, followed closely by heavy burrowers and arboreals because those groups can utilize other aspects of their tanks/environment to create more living space. The largest tanks are reserved for large, active tarantulas that do not burrow. My Nhandu carapoensis and Theraphosa blondi, neither of which dig, have the largest tanks. Hysterocrates gigas, by comparison, is housed less spaciously due to its burrowing habits, but still remains in a larger tank than, say, my H. lividums.


Adrian
 

Tranz

Arachnobaron
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Sep 18, 2002
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According to The Tarantula Keeper's Guide, "the width of a cage should be at least one and one-half times times the tarantula's maximum leg span, and the length at least one and one-half times the width." Therefore, the minimum for yours, assuming the 4" is a fully-outstretched length, is 9 inches long and 6 inches wide.
 
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