What is meant by "real" Theraphosa blondi?

jeryst

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
30
I've seen this a few times, and was just wondering what is meant by the term "real" Theraphosa blondi.

Are other T's being sold under the wrong name? Are there several different species of the same thing?

Kind of confused because a Theraphosa blondi is my next spider, and I'd like to know as much about it as I can before I buy.
 

mcluskyisms

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 16, 2009
Messages
843
I've seen this a few times, and was just wondering what is meant by the term "real" Theraphosa blondi.

Are other T's being sold under the wrong name? Are there several different species of the same thing?

Kind of confused because a Theraphosa blondi is my next spider, and I'd like to know as much about it as I can before I buy.
There are currently three main known species of the Theraphosa genus which are Theraphosa apophysis, Theraphosa blondi and a tarantula referred to as Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" (hopefully soon to be classified Theraphosa spinipes)

Now the problem stems from the fact that That many hobbyist have been keeping these Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" without really knowing, believing themselves that they have actually been keeping Theraphosa blondi.
There isn't a great deal of difference between the two species especially as adults one of the main differences visually being that Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" lack the presence of hairs on there Patella where as both Theraphosa apophysis and Theraphosa blondi have them.
Another thing to note is that as spiderlings and small juveniles each one of the species look fairly different.
At these stages you will find that Theraphosa apophysis have pink Tarsi on all eight legs and Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" have pink Tarsi on the front four legs (Pairs I & II) whereas Theraphosa blondi have no pink Tarsi at all.

The term "True blondi" stems from the fact that a lot of enthusiasts are only just starting to come to terms that Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" is in fact a different species and not a natural colour variant of the Theraphosa blondi
 

psykoink

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
31
There are currently three main known species of the Theraphosa genus which are Theraphosa apophysis, Theraphosa blondi and a tarantula referred to as Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" (hopefully soon to be classified Theraphosa spinipes)

Now the problem stems from the fact that That many hobbyist have been keeping these Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" without really knowing, believing themselves that they have actually been keeping Theraphosa blondi.
There isn't a great deal of difference between the two species especially as adults one of the main differences visually being that Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" lack the presence of hairs on there Patella where as both Theraphosa apophysis and Theraphosa blondi have them.
Another thing to note is that as spiderlings and small juveniles each one of the species look fairly different.
At these stages you will find that Theraphosa apophysis have pink Tarsi on all eight legs and Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" have pink Tarsi on the front four legs (Pairs I & II) whereas Theraphosa blondi have no pink Tarsi at all.

The term "True blondi" stems from the fact that a lot of enthusiasts are only just starting to come to terms that Theraphosa sp. "Burgundy" is in fact a different species and not a natural colour variant of the Theraphosa blondi
I agree. Check out these links for a better explaination and photos.

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showpost.php?p=1686818&postcount=74

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showpost.php?p=1597706&postcount=38

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showpost.php?p=1553749&postcount=20
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
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Nov 21, 2009
Messages
733
Oops! I think I hear The Mack heading full steam this way from up around the bend! {D
 

Tindalos

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Messages
158
also T.blondi are harder to come by, all the lps in my area only sell T.spinipes, and on rare occasions aphosysis, but i have never seen a T.blondi.
 

jeryst

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 10, 2010
Messages
30
QUestion about how a T matures

Does maturity come at a certain age, or does it come after a certain number of molts?

Or is it something entirely different that determines maturity?
 

AphonopelmaTX

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 7, 2004
Messages
1,306
Does maturity come at a certain age, or does it come after a certain number of molts?

Or is it something entirely different that determines maturity?
Maturity means the point in which the tarantula can reproduce which isn't easily measured by a visual inspection of a live spider. It also can't be definitively measured by the number of molts (instars) or age (in years). When inspecting a dead specimen or the shed excuvia of a live one, one can basically get a good idea of maturity by the development of the reproductive organs as the spermathecae (for instance in a female) develops over the course of time throughout the instars. Of course for males, maturity is easy to recognize by the presence of the emboli. Other morphological structures also develop as a tarantula grows which is why only fully grown tarantulas (or spiders in general) are used in taxonomy.

Basically, it takes a lot of experience comparing individual spiders at all stages of development to determine when outer and inner structures can be considered fully developed or a lot of reading of hobby sites and material on breeding successes where the size of the female is used. Again, in males maturity is when they have the palpal embolus- easy enough.

- Lonnie
 
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