What is Chilobrachys sp.Black Satan?

Walker253

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90 bucks is highway robbery. I bought a sexed 4" female for 40 and a 2.5" sexed female for 35. I saw a bunch of unsexed larger ones at the last reptile show for 35. I've seen slings as low as 8 bucks
 

cold blood

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How much do they usually go for? Because I saw being sold for 89.99 and another was 24.99. That's a wild fluctuation in price.

Nice, she is quite beautiful.
The wide variance is due to differences in the individual spider...sexed females are always worth the most...slings are always the best bargain.....now $90 for even a female vagans is a lot......larger slings run $10-15, small slings can be had for 3-8 bucks. I've got larger slings (1+") for $12....theyre typically not too difficult to find.
 

Jmanbeing93

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90 bucks is highway robbery. I bought a sexed 4" female for 40 and a 2.5" sexed female for 35. I saw a bunch of unsexed larger ones at the last reptile show for 35. I've seen slings as low as 8 bucks
Wow, who would do such a thing? Why jack the prices like that? I am glad that to hear that I can get one for much, much cheaper.
 

Jmanbeing93

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The wide variance is due to differences in the individual spider...sexed females are always worth the most...slings are always the best bargain.....now $90 for even a female vagans is a lot......larger slings run $10-15, small slings can be had for 3-8 bucks. I've got larger slings (1+") for $12....theyre typically not too difficult to find.
Oh ok, I get it now. Sorry,I must have missed this. I think if l were to get a spider, I would be looking at the slings.
 

Ungoliant

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How much do they usually go for? Because I saw being sold for 89.99 and another was 24.99. That's a wild fluctuation in price.
Price also varies a lot by species. Even two members of the same genus might be priced quite differently. For example, Grammostola pulchra tends to be fairly expensive ($90 might not be unreasonable for a juvenile), whereas Grammostola pulchripes is much more affordable.

Geographic location also plays a big role. There are species that are common in the U.S. and rare in Europe and vice versa.
 

mconnachan

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Slings are the way to go if price is an issue, here in the UK I paid £6 for 2 slings, another time I paid £25 but that was a P. metallica sling, one of the highest priced slings was a for a Typhochlaena seladonia - £400.00, that's expensive for a 6mm spider, very rare at one time. Usually slings are the best way to go, as you get to know that particular spiders behaviour, imo.
 

mconnachan

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Price also varies a lot by species. Even two members of the same genus might be priced quite differently. For example, Grammostola pulchra tends to be fairly expensive ($90 might not be unreasonable for a juvenile), whereas Grammostola pulchripes is much more affordable.

Geographic location also plays a big role. There are species that are common in the U.S. and rare in Europe and vice versa.
Have to agree with this, there seems to be more variety in the States, but some seem very expensive, compared to the UK/Europe. Although here in the UK we don't have as many breeders as in the States, we usually have to go wholesale, and in turn we pay more, depending on sp.
 

Jmanbeing93

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So how does the Black Satan (Chilobrachys sp.) actually behave? How does it compare to the NWTs?
 

mack1855

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Or you could always keep a eye out for a Chilobrachys sp.GoodnaturedCreampuff.:angelic:
 

Walker253

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Typical Chilobrachys, grumpy and reclusive. They are fossorial and stay in their hole mostly. If you catch them out, they'll great you with a threat posture. First option is to flee to their hole. Second is you may get a that threat posture or worse. They may decide to do anything including running up a pair of tongs to bite you on the way out. That's a big reason why they aren't a beginning species.
Comparing that to a new world, depends. If you stay with a fossorial T, they're kinda similar, but more toned down. The bite doesn't pack the punch. They are still reclusive, but if caught out, you may get that threat posture, but other attempts are usually just to escape.
As far as regular terrestrial NW's, its nowhere near the same. Some New World terrestrials get a bit grumpy (P cancerides), but it's way more manageable. The risks are much less. They tend to be slower as well. Other NW terrestrials will kick uricating hairs for defense.
 

Jmanbeing93

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Typical Chilobrachys, grumpy and reclusive. They are fossorial and stay in their hole mostly. If you catch them out, they'll great you with a threat posture. First option is to flee to their hole. Second is you may get a that threat posture or worse. They may decide to do anything including running up a pair of tongs to bite you on the way out. That's a big reason why they aren't a beginning species.
Comparing that to a new world, depends. If you stay with a fossorial T, they're kinda similar, but more toned down. The bite doesn't pack the punch. They are still reclusive, but if caught out, you may get that threat posture, but other attempts are usually just to escape.
As far as regular terrestrial NW's, its nowhere near the same. Some New World terrestrials get a bit grumpy (P cancerides), but it's way more manageable. The risks are much less. They tend to be slower as well. Other NW terrestrials will kick uricating hairs for defense.
Definitely an irritable creature and serious business, I definitely see why they are not for beginners. The OW and NW T's sound like they really are worlds apart.
 

Poec54

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Definitely an irritable creature and serious business, I definitely see why they are not for beginners. The OW and NW T's sound like they really are worlds apart.

Good observation. Most NW's rely on urticating hairs, which are basically projectiles they can safely throw from a distance. They often have larger, rounder abdomens because running isn't necessarily their first line of defense, and because it allows them a larger patch of urticating hairs.

OW's don't have it so good. They rely more on a combination of high speed running, unpredictable bursts, threats & bites, and stronger venom. Standing in a defensive posture is risky, as the spider can no longer see it's adversary. Biting too has it's drawbacks, as that requires physical contact and allows adversaries a greater opportunity to injure or kill the spider. None of what we see from them in captivity is anger, it's fear for their lives. To them we're another potential predator than can kill them in a second.
 

darkness975

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Good observation. Most NW's rely on urticating hairs, which are basically projectiles they can safely throw from a distance. They often have larger, rounder abdomens because running isn't necessarily their first line of defense, and because it allows them a larger patch of urticating hairs.

OW's don't have it so good. They rely more on a combination of high speed running, unpredictable bursts, threats & bites, and stronger venom. Standing in a defensive posture is risky, as the spider can no longer see it's adversary. Biting too has it's drawbacks, as that requires physical contact and allows adversaries a greater opportunity to injure or kill the spider. None of what we see from them in captivity is anger, it's fear for their lives. To them we're another potential predator than can kill them in a second.
Good to see you back, friend. Missed you !

@Jmanbeing93 yes there are stark differences as others have mentioned. Best to not jump into OW's right away.
 

Poec54

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Walker253: Great advice in your posts. Experience and knowledge I don't see often enough. You know your stuff. Glad you're here.
 

Jmanbeing93

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BTW, in the meantime Chilobrachys sp. Black Satan was IDed as Chilobrachys fumosus.
Is Chilobrachys fumosus supposed to be black? It looks more a brown color and comes from India.
Black Satan should be solid black and comes from Nepal. I am confused.

http://www.tarantupedia.com/selenocosmiinae/chilobrachys/chilobrachys-fumosus

Look at the picture, the spider appears to be brown instead of black.

Not a good video but the note how black the Black Satan is:

I am not sure that it is the same spider as fumosus.

A better video, skip to the 1:10 mark:
 
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Martin H.

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Is Chilobrachys fumosus supposed to be black?
says who?
BTW, colour is in tarantulas not a taxonomic relevant factor.


It looks more a brown color and comes from India.
Black Satan should be solid black and comes from Nepal. I am confused.
tarantulas don't pay attention to human borders!

Don't know who IDed the brownish spiders and how which where introduced years with the lable "Chilobrachys fumosus" into the pet trade - only thing I can say: Volker von Wirth examined material from the "black satan" stuff and came to the conclusion, that it is similar to Chilobrachys fumosus.
 
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