What is a beginner species of tarantula that can live in a 5.5 gallon tank

What species should I get if I had to get one or the other


  • Total voters
    11
  • Poll closed .

shadowjimmy107

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
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Hi, my name is jimmy and I am starting to get into tarantulas. Now I am a BIG reptile person owning many reptiles. Now my brother was going to get me a tarantula for Christmas but he said he couldn't keep it warm so he gave me a gift card to Petco. Now I decide to look more into tarantulas to see if I would like them and I decided to give them a shot. Now doing a lot of research I have found that they don't need large cages. Now I don't have access to a range of tanks so I got a 5.5-gallon tank. Now I have been drying out eco earth so I am able to add as much as I need. So height is not an issue. Now the first type of tarantula I was going to get was a euathlus sp. red (Chilean flame I think). Now I still like them a lot and I still would not be opposed to getting one it just there a little small for me. And care sheets are not that good so I can't find that many articles on specific info. The other species is the Brachypelma albopilosum (Honduran curly hair). I really like this species and I think that I this would also be a very good starter from what I hear. But I don't know I have the proper tank size. My main question would be what is the best species to get following these points.
  • They need to be able to live in a 5.5-gallon tank
  • A terrestrial and dry species
  • At least tolerant of handling
  • Slow
  • Not super expensive
  • A beginner type.
I am going to order the tarantula off of http://www.net-bug.net/ because they are cheapish and have some good reviews. Any help would be greatly appreciated
 

dopamine

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 7, 2010
Messages
341
Both of those are great species to start out with. The Euathlus is the prettier of the two in my opinion.
You didn't mention one in your post but just wanna throw it out there to stay away from any sort of heat pads, if temperatures are an issue in your area.
Space heater works just fine.
 

shadowjimmy107

Arachnopeon
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Dec 30, 2016
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Both of those are great species to start out with. The Euathlus is the prettier of the two in my opinion.
You didn't mention one in your post but just wanna throw it out there to stay away from any sort of heat pads, if temperatures are an issue in your area.
Space heater works just fine.
Thank you. I have a space heater so temps are not a problem.
 

Goodlukwitthat

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 10, 2015
Messages
179
If you're going to order, I would recommend www.Jamiestarantulas.com Her prices are awesome and her shipping is super cheap. You will have to wait to order when winter is over. Most reputable places do not ship during winter. Paul Becker at www.petcenterusa.net might still be shipping, his overnight is $39 and I've never had issues with either of those sellers. Now then as for the species, I personally, would recommend species from the Brachypelma genus. I have some B. vagans and an adult female B. smithi. A. chalcodes is a good beginner (personal opinion mine is the most boring tarantula because she is literally scared of EVERYTHING. You open her cage and she hides her eyes with her legs or dives in her hide. She would rather stay hidden than be seen in the open.) The B. smithi I have witnessed her behavior since she was roughly 1 1/2 inches (she's now 5 inches). She rarely goes in her hide, she has been known to redecorate her enclosure, bury her water dish, threat pose, eat like a piggy, and with her most recent molt, she has been a VERY moody I'm going to come at anything that moves in my home tarantula lol. I don't advise handling, honestly there are so many risks involved with handling. The tarantula could spook and bolt, could jump (avics are good jumpers lol) and fall to their death. Don't underestimate even the bigger tarantulas because they can teleport if they need to. A tarantula could fall off your hand or run up your back....could even bite you, you jerk, tarantula goes flying in the air. Just why risk it when they are better left alone to be observed? :p As for husbandry, a B. smithi can live happily in a 5 gal tank for it's adult size. If you get a smaller tarantula (most places online sell them between 1/4- to adult size) smaller tarantulas need smaller homes (easier to feed, easier to find, the tarantula will feel more secure).
 

shadowjimmy107

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
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If you're going to order, I would recommend www.Jamiestarantulas.com Her prices are awesome and her shipping is super cheap. You will have to wait to order when winter is over. Most reputable places do not ship during winter. Paul Becker at www.petcenterusa.net might still be shipping, his overnight is $39 and I've never had issues with either of those sellers. Now then as for the species, I personally, would recommend species from the Brachypelma genus. I have some B. vagans and an adult female B. smithi. A. chalcodes is a good beginner (personal opinion mine is the most boring tarantula because she is literally scared of EVERYTHING. You open her cage and she hides her eyes with her legs or dives in her hide. She would rather stay hidden than be seen in the open.) The B. smithi I have witnessed her behavior since she was roughly 1 1/2 inches (she's now 5 inches). She rarely goes in her hide, she has been known to redecorate her enclosure, bury her water dish, threat pose, eat like a piggy, and with her most recent molt, she has been a VERY moody I'm going to come at anything that moves in my home tarantula lol. I don't advise handling, honestly there are so many risks involved with handling. The tarantula could spook and bolt, could jump (avics are good jumpers lol) and fall to their death. Don't underestimate even the bigger tarantulas because they can teleport if they need to. A tarantula could fall off your hand or run up your back....could even bite you, you jerk, tarantula goes flying in the air. Just why risk it when they are better left alone to be observed? :p As for husbandry, a B. smithi can live happily in a 5 gal tank for it's adult size. If you get a smaller tarantula (most places online sell them between 1/4- to adult size) smaller tarantulas need smaller homes (easier to feed, easier to find, the tarantula will feel more secure).
Hi, I looked on www.Jamiestarantulas.com and the curly hairs are $24.00 for a T that is 1 inch. Now I was hoping to get one a little bigger but the only other one is $85.00 and that does not include shipping. Now is there anywhere else besides the one above that you might know of
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
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Messages
3,661
Welcome to the hobby :)

Handling is not advised, as i'm sure you've read while going through your research. If you insist on handling, make sure your hands are close to the ground, so when it bolts, it hopefully doesn't take a deadly plunge. (Notice how i say 'when' instead of 'if' ;) )
I'm not very familiar with gallons, but for a sling/juvie, it will be a bit too much space. Larger, adult size are a bit more expensive, but with the genera you're choosing, they will be with you for at least a decade, if not two, when properly cared for.
I would not go to Petco for your tarantula. Use the search function and fill in Petco, and you'll understand why.
As for care, both can be kept dry with a waterdish, although they both like a bit moisture now and then. I overflow their waterdishes when it gets too dry.
Another species you can look into if you want to keep it dry, is the C.cyaneopubescens, aka GBB.

If you want extended info on species, beginnertips, check out EulersK YouTube series 'AraneAid'.
For sellers you can contact anyone on here in the classifieds. If you want more info, type your search in Google, and add arachnoboards to it. (Google knows better how to find stuff on here than Ab itself)
 

shadowjimmy107

Arachnopeon
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Dec 30, 2016
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Welcome to the hobby :)

Handling is not advised, as i'm sure you've read while going through your research. If you insist on handling, make sure your hands are close to the ground, so when it bolts, it hopefully doesn't take a deadly plunge. (Notice how i say 'when' instead of 'if' ;) )
I'm not very familiar with gallons, but for a sling/juvie, it will be a bit too much space. Larger, adult size are a bit more expensive, but with the genera you're choosing, they will be with you for at least a decade, if not two, when properly cared for.
I would not go to Petco for your tarantula. Use the search function and fill in Petco, and you'll understand why.
As for care, both can be kept dry with a waterdish, although they both like a bit moisture now and then. I overflow their waterdishes when it gets too dry.
Another species you can look into if you want to keep it dry, is the C.cyaneopubescens, aka GBB.

If you want extended info on species, beginnertips, check out EulersK YouTube series 'AraneAid'.
For sellers you can contact anyone on here in the classifieds. If you want more info, type your search in Google, and add arachnoboards to it. (Google knows better how to find stuff on here than Ab itself)
Thank you very much. I am not planning to handle I whole lot. Mostly when 1 people want to see and 2 for taming reasons for when I go in there she/he has a smaller chance to nip XD. But I know too much about Petco and I never buy from them (at least their animals). And I watched every video on Eulersk Channel. He helps A LOT. And about the C.cyaneopubescens. I think there beautiful but there just a bit too quick for me. And about the seller thank you. I was planning to get a Curly Haired off of jamiestarantulas.com But I will look around first. Thank you :)
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
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Thank you very much. I am not planning to handle I whole lot. Mostly when 1 people want to see and 2 for taming reasons for when I go in there she/he has a smaller chance to nip XD. But I know too much about Petco and I never buy from them (at least their animals). And I watched every video on Eulersk Channel. He helps A LOT. And about the C.cyaneopubescens. I think there beautiful but there just a bit too quick for me. And about the seller thank you. I was planning to get a Curly Haired off of jamiestarantulas.com But I will look around first. Thank you :)
You can't really tame them. they don't have the mind for it like say a dog does. So they can't really learn and be trained. Each time you pick them up is the same as the first time. With most Ts it's a scary experience for them even is they don't flip out and run.

I'd look at the classified section for the best prices on Ts. I have ordered from Jamies and it turned out great but you can get better deals from the classified section IMO.
 

shadowjimmy107

Arachnopeon
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You can't really tame them. they don't have the mind for it like say a dog does. So they can't really learn and be trained. Each time you pick them up is the same as the first time. With most Ts it's a scary experience for them even is they don't flip out and run.

I'd look at the classified section for the best prices on Ts. I have ordered from Jamies and it turned out great but you can get better deals from the classified section IMO.
Thank you very much. I knew that they are instinct driven animals and they couldn't me tamed like a dog or something but I thought that it would be similar to my snake. They "grow"(i guess) to the person to learn that this bigger animal is not going to kill them, in better words. But I am fine with I looking at animal as I owned a chameleon and he was SO much fun to take care of.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
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Thank you very much. I knew that they are instinct driven animals and they couldn't me tamed like a dog or something but I thought that it would be similar to my snake. They "grow"(i guess) to the person to learn that this bigger animal is not going to kill them, in better words. But I am fine with I looking at animal as I owned a chameleon and he was SO much fun to take care of.
No problem. When I started with Ts I didn't know how their nerve bundle of a brain worked either.

None of your Ts will be able to tell you from anyone else. They just don't have the brain for it. Each time you work with them they likely think you are trying to lure them out to eat them. Which is why most Ts will run for their hides when you move their enclosures. I have mine in a room just for the pets and they don't get disturbed a lot. Because of that I am able to see them out a lot more and can often sneak in and grab some nice photos of them. In a high traffic room you'll see them out a lot less.

As far as reptiles go. I have had Fred, my ball python, for over 10 years now. He is docile and tolerates holding but none of them ever really want to be held. They would rather you left them alone. Ringo, my breaded dragon, doesn't freak out as long as I hold him so his feet are touching something (like me). They don't enjoy being held either IMO. Fred will not be able to pick me out form any other human nor will Ringo. One large animal is the same to them as another one.
 

shadowjimmy107

Arachnopeon
Joined
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Messages
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No problem. When I started with Ts I didn't know how their nerve bundle of a brain worked either.

None of your Ts will be able to tell you from anyone else. They just don't have the brain for it. Each time you work with them they likely think you are trying to lure them out to eat them. Which is why most Ts will run for their hides when you move their enclosures. I have mine in a room just for the pets and they don't get disturbed a lot. Because of that I am able to see them out a lot more and can often sneak in and grab some nice photos of them. In a high traffic room you'll see them out a lot less.

As far as reptiles go. I have had Fred, my ball python, for over 10 years now. He is docile and tolerates holding but none of them ever really want to be held. They would rather you left them alone. Ringo, my breaded dragon, doesn't freak out as long as I hold him so his feet are touching something (like me). They don't enjoy being held either IMO. Fred will not be able to pick me out form any other human nor will Ringo. One large animal is the same to them as another one.
Ya reptile don't enjoy handling but they just don't care. But I have another question about jamiestarantulas.com is you know. Now do they ship during winter. And if so if I choose standard shipping (1-3 days) How unsafe will that be. I can have somebody pick it up when it gets here.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
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Messages
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Ya reptile don't enjoy handling but they just don't care. But I have another question about jamiestarantulas.com is you know. Now do they ship during winter. And if so if I choose standard shipping (1-3 days) How unsafe will that be. I can have somebody pick it up when it gets here.
She does a great job packing Ts and I'm sure they ship during winter. However temps can change and Ts (especially slings) don't do well in cold temps. She does include a heat pad but I did lose a A.versi sling I order from her. It was packed great but the temps just dropped too low for it. She made it good by shipping another one but since then I don't order Ts from late Dec to late Feb unless it's special circumstances.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Mostly when 1 people want to see and 2 for taming reasons for when I go in there she/he has a smaller chance to nip
Reptile owner here first, T owner second. I read all your posts. There is no taming a tarantula. They are not like reptiles, trust me. In fact, none of my reptile experience has been useful with Ts, w/the exception of temps increasing metabolism.

I own both an adult female B. albo I raised from a sling, and I've raised E sp Reds as well. I wouldn't handle either, to protect them.

However, when it comes to flicking urticating setae the only 2 commonly kept Ts that generally don't flick are E. sp. Red and G. pulchripes, and E. sp. Red is a bit better on that too, just a bit. I own an AF G. pulchripes I raised from a sling, she's far better to deal with than my B. albo.

Getting any Brachypelma and hoping it doesn't flick is just a crap shoot, there's no way to know at any point in its life cycle whether that behavior will change or not.

 

Haemus

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
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128
I voted for the euathlus sp. red, but only out of preference.

+1 to what @viper69 said about the G. pulchripes, that was my first T as well. Also consider the G. pulchra, a burly velvet black version of the G. pulchripes :)
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
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Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
I have handled rose hairs, my curly hair, a red rump, Avics and g pulchripes without incident. I don't make a habit of it, but those mentioned don't freak when I hold them and do maintenance on their enclosure. I would go with the B albopilosum.

There are rose hairs at most pet shops for a good price that would do perfect in a 5.5 gallon. People will tell you they are boring pet rocks, but most of my tarantulas are just like my Rosies lol. Feeding time is about the most excitement you get from most (at least the ones I own). Just suggestions good luck on whatever you decide :)
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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I have handled rose hairs, my curly hair, a red rump, Avics and g pulchripes without incident.
You have just been lucky, that's all. Avics as you may know will take a flying leap off anything at any height with little warning, sometimes with none. And as some members have found out, so will a NW terrestrial, like a Rose Hair and other similar NW terrestrials.
 

Haksilence

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Welcome to the hobby!
First off I have to stop and commend you on your responsiveness to what everyone has said so far! I must say I'm impressed at how receptive you are. Kudos, it's a nice change around here.

Just about any non-dwarf species could live happily in a 5.5g, anything from the following genus' will be a good choice.
Brachypelma
Grammostola
Lasiodora
Acanthoscuria
Aphonopelma (last choice for a reason, tend to have a bit of an attitude and some are heavy burrowers making them much less visible)

Brachypelma is probably one of the best bets, and albopilosum are cheap and regularly available. In order to find an adult specimen, or at least slightly larger I'd recommend looking into the classifieds section of the forums.

Specifically there is at least one seller who has an adult albo female.

Likewise jaimiestarantulas, swift inverts, JRs inverts, kenthebugguy (although usually pricey, top notch) and arachnoden are also good dealers that might have something for you.
 

Haksilence

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Just to parrot what @viper69 said, you got lucky. All my albos with the exception of one exceptionally placid individual are quote frantic and skittish (WC Nicaraguan stock) I'm positive they would all readily bolt if handled.

I also +1 the chaco. Pulchripes is probably THE best starter T and I think a lot of people agree, there is no question they are handsomer T's but they can get kinda pricey for an adult female.

If you go with an albo expect to pay 60-100$ for an adult female, while a adult female pulchripes will probably run 200$+
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
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You have just been lucky, that's all. Avics as you may know will take a flying leap off anything at any height with little warning, sometimes with none. And as some members have found out, so will a NW terrestrial, like a Rose Hair and other similar NW terrestrials.
Right on. I would never handle them off the ground and won't hold the pink toes but to rehouse or clean their enclosures. The only one I have routinely handled to show people is my biggest rose hair. Won't lie, I've held her probably 100 times over the last two years. Nobody should take that as a suggestion to handle their t's, just sharing my experience with the wonderful Rosies.
 

Andrea82

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Right on. I would never handle them off the ground and won't hold the pink toes but to rehouse or clean their enclosures. The only one I have routinely handled to show people is my biggest rose hair. Won't lie, I've held her probably 100 times over the last two years. Nobody should take that as a suggestion to handle their t's, just sharing my experience with the wonderful Rosies.
'rosies' also are notorious for their Jekyll&Hyde-like temperament, and because of that, not a species i would
choose for handling. If i would handle, that is.
When i started, i have had my B.albo and E.campestraus on my hands, because it was like magic to me, having a spider, an exotic, on my hand in my own home. A piece of what i saw on NG and Discovery channel, right in front of me. But after that, never again.i have seen pics of
how a T looks when it has fallen to its death. It makes me sick to my stomach.
They maybe look like tanks or big and scary, but T's are more fragile than most people think

So if you must handle to have had that experience, only do it once. Place the enclosure on the floor, and keep your hands as low as possible. Be prepared for a bolt or jump from an Avicularia. Kicking hairs,freezing up, running, are all defenses, and mean you have to put the spider back IMMEDIATELY.

This the best advice i can give. The rest is up to you.
 
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