What do you think made this?

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
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May 24, 2009
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I live in Birmingham, AL and I found this two days ago in a tree right outside my backdoor. Does anyone have a clue to what species might have made something like this?







 

sn95

Arachnopeon
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Aug 3, 2008
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44
My best guess would be some sort of Tent worm, I could be wrong though.
 

Nicole

Arachnosquire
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Apr 30, 2004
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Looks like the work of tent caterpillars to me
 

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
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And here I am thinking that it was a spider doing this!?!?:wall: Thanks for the replies. It's a neat looking web though.
 

davisfam

Arachnoknight
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H. laoticus

Arachnoprince
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davisfam

Arachnoknight
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After doing a little more online research, I am starting to think that this web-like cocoon was built by Fall webworms (Hyphantria cunea) whose “tents/webs” are often mistaken for a species of the Tent caterpillar. Fall webworms weave their webs on the ends of branches and are protected by the silken tent, the tent becomes enlarged as the webworms become larger in size. Also, Tent caterpillars build their “webs/tents” in the crotch of trees and usually don’t go much further than that point. :?

- Also, Tent caterpillars create tents from May to June and Fall webworms create tents from the middle of July to the middle of September.

Why do they do this in the first place?
As for a reason behind these “tent-like” structures, research explains that for the Fall webworm, the worms form their webs on the ends of branches to feed on foliage. The young worms eat upper leaf surfaces and as they grow, the worms eat everything except the thickest veins. For the Tent caterpillars, they are known as generalist feeders which is why they are often found around fields connecting to alternate hosts. The larvae feed in large groups on the foliage which often results in complete destruction of the leaves. If unattended, larvae can attack an entire small bush/shrub. It's insaaane what these little worms can do although their webs have been known to be more of a disturbance than art work to most people who find themselves dealing with them. :p

Source(s):

http://www.emmitsburg.net/gardens/articles/adams/2001/fall_webworms.htm

http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ipm/blue/tent_caterpillar.html
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
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Ugh... I hate those dang tent caterpillars. They were so bad in parts of WV where I used to live that whole sections of wooded areas would be filled with dead or dying trees because of these nasty lil buggers. I also have a nasty childhood memory of trying to burn their tent (like i'd seen my dad do) and being showered by flaming caterpillars. The trick, you see, is not to stand under the nest when you set it alight.

But yeah, they are demon spawn. There aren't many bugs I don't like but tent 'pillars are right up there with fleas, ticks and mosquito's in my "not-shinola" list.
 

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
734
After doing a little more online research, I am starting to think that this web-like cocoon was built by Fall webworms (Hyphantria cunea) whose “tents/webs” are often mistaken for a species of the Tent caterpillar. Fall webworms weave their webs on the ends of branches and are protected by the silken tent, the tent becomes enlarged as the webworms become larger in size. Also, Tent caterpillars build their “webs/tents” in the crotch of trees and usually don’t go much further than that point. :?

- Also, Tent caterpillars create tents from May to June and Fall webworms create tents from the middle of July to the middle of September.



As for a reason behind these “tent-like” structures, research explains that for the Fall webworm, the worms form their webs on the ends of branches to feed on foliage. The young worms eat upper leaf surfaces and as they grow, the worms eat everything except the thickest veins. For the Tent caterpillars, they are known as generalist feeders which is why they are often found around fields connecting to alternate hosts. The larvae feed in large groups on the foliage which often results in complete destruction of the leaves. If unattended, larvae can attack an entire small bush/shrub. It's insaaane what these little worms can do although their webs have been known to be more of a disturbance than art work to most people who find themselves dealing with them. :p

Source(s):

http://www.emmitsburg.net/gardens/articles/adams/2001/fall_webworms.htm

http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ipm/blue/tent_caterpillar.html
Well thanks for that info.!! I hadn't even heard of these until now.:wall:
 

davisfam

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
287
Well thanks for that info.!! I hadn't even heard of these until now.:wall:
Well, to be honest.. I just researched them a few months ago because I was going crazy with curiousity, some of their tent webs are huge and soo weird looking. I just had to know what in the heck it was, LOL! :razz:
 
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