What do you guys think this is...

2oCHEVYo0

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 29, 2010
Messages
67
My brother is currently over in Cambodia on a vacation and stumbled across this tarantula. Was wondering if anybody knew what kind it was and if it was in the hobby over here. If not, he's going to see what he's got to do to bring em over or if it's even possible.

 

Lorum

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 10, 2010
Messages
111
Haplopelma sp. (maybe someone can give you a more specific ID, it could be Haplopelma longipes or something else).
 

captmarga

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
340
Nothing to show scale on the photo, but there is the
Thailand Black Tarantulas (Haplopelma minax). According the the searches I've done, they are nice to look at but aggressive.

I am also sure there is much paperwork to be done to bring one back... CITES paperwork.

Quite a find, though! Thanks for sharing the photo!

Marga
 

Bengal21

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
42
I'm by no means an expert, but I do have a longipes and this one doesn't have the tiger stripes on its rump like mine does.
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Apr 16, 2006
Messages
540
That thing looks REALLY shiny and not hairy. Are we sure that's even a tarantula and not some type of mygalomorph?
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
241
That is a female Haplopelma minax.
I don't think you can tell the sex from this picture.

That thing looks REALLY shiny and not hairy. Are we sure that's even a tarantula and not some type of mygalomorph?
This was my guess, it certainly doesn't look like an species I have looked into, I don't own any Halpo's but it doesn't really have any of the markings it seems. Could it be a Haplo badly in need of a molt?

Thailand Black Tarantulas (Haplopelma minax). According the the searches I've done, they are nice to look at but aggressive.
It would be defensive not aggressive.
 
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Scourge

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Jan 3, 2005
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255
I'm thinking that it's a beat up / rubbed / in need of a moult Haplopelma or Ornithoctonus sp.
I think H. albostriatum and H. longipes are described from Cambodia, but there are probably more species that can be found there.
But I don't think it's easy to narrow it down any further without some more detailed pictures.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Apr 11, 2007
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5,450
It does look a bit like H. minax but I don't think that's it. Besides, if they don't range into Cambodia then they don't range into Cambodia. I think the eye cluster looks to be raised too high to be a Haplopelma. Also, even in an H. minax you can see hints of striping on the abdomen and this specimen has absolutely none of that.

It would be nice to have an idea of it's size. The folks saying it could be a non-T myg -like a trapdoor- may be onto something if it's only say, 2"-3" DLS. Note that it isn't shiny and hairless like a Gorgyrella, it still has some hair. Great find though, whatever it is! Thanks for posting it for us to argue about.
 

paassatt

Arachnoangel
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
887
Are we sure that's even a tarantula and not some type of mygalomorph?
All tarantulas are mygalomorphae. It refers to the positioning of their fangs. (see mygalomorphae and araneomorphae)
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
241
All tarantulas are mygalomorphae. It refers to the positioning of their fangs. (see mygalomorphae and araneomorphae)
I think what she meant was that it was some type of true spider similar to the trap doors. At least that is what it looks like to me.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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I just noticed how unusually small the rear legs are. That must be a distinguishing characteristic.
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
241
Trapdoors are also mygalemorphae
I know, I just have never heard of someone describing a tarantula in that way. Not to say it isn't correct, I have just never heard of it. I have heard of Gorgyrella species described as mygalemorphae though.
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Apr 16, 2006
Messages
540
All tarantulas are mygalomorphae. It refers to the positioning of their fangs. (see mygalomorphae and araneomorphae)
I didn't know that, I just always see people referring to trapdoors & similar spiders as mygalomorphae, never seen a tarantula referred to as such.

I think what she meant was that it was some type of true spider similar to the trap doors. At least that is what it looks like to me.
That is what I meant.
 

paassatt

Arachnoangel
Joined
Nov 19, 2010
Messages
887
I didn't know that, I just always see people referring to trapdoors & similar spiders as mygalomorphae, never seen a tarantula referred to as such.
Wolf spiders are a good example of araneomorphae. Their fangs move from side-to-side as opposed to up and down.
 

Falk

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 28, 2009
Messages
679
I didn't know that, I just always see people referring to trapdoors & similar spiders as mygalomorphae, never seen a tarantula referred to as such.



That is what I meant.
Suborder: Mygalemorphae
Family: Theraphosidae
Subfamily: Aviculariinae (example)
 
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