What did we do wrong/can we do better? Posting for my teenager

Adelheid1976

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Sep 19, 2022
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Thanks for all the feedback, I really appreciate it! The dead T wasn't on it's back getting ready for molt- it was on it's stomach, all its legs were curled up underneath of it, it's abdomen was deflated, and we gave it another 36 hours and then there was a distinct odor.

So ultimately, all the research was geared towards a Chilean Rose Hair (because ALL the videos and guides said they were the best) and then we found out they weren't available. So that pivoted to talking to people at expos, which is how we ended up with the Curly Hair- they are similar "enough", though now we know the dealer was basically just taking advantage of newbies.
I really have to agree, so much out there is conflicting advice, bad advice, or just old. Our library had a first edition copy of The Tarantula Keeper's Guide and well....we apparently know a lot more now.

At this point, we've looked at the "The Best Tarantula Species for Beginners" article from Tom's Big Spiders (from 2014, still has G. rosea on the list) and the G. pulchripes Chaco Golden Knee is one we may be looking for. Alternatively, Chromatapelma cyaneopubescens caught their eye from his list! (GBB is really pretty...) However, I don't know what the availability of either species is locally and I haven't searched the Boards for advice yet. We were also watching a video from Exotics Lair on Youtube and the Aphonopelma chalcodes was intriguing- especially as it's a native species rather than exotic.

HOWEVER...need to remodel the enclosure first before getting an occupant for it. The wrong things were being worried about, clearly!
 

cold blood

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So ultimately, all the research was geared towards a Chilean Rose Hair
Here is the thing...the care is basically the same....and really, it is pretty much the same for nearly all beginner species.
because ALL the videos and guides said they were the best)
Theyre not...the curly you had is far better...rose hairs are among the most boring and inactive of all ts.

G. pulchripes is another really good one.
 

JonnyTorch

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321
@Adelheid1976 Tarantulas with similar care mentioned above I'd recommend is anything Grammostola or Aphonopelma or Brachypelma. Brachypelma seems to take the cake for most colorful beginner species. A Brachypelma hamorii is a classic, same for Aphonopelma chalcodes. Grammostola pulcha or Grammostola pulchripes would be good too (although pulchra can be pricey.) I agree with cold blood. My Rosea just sits there like a rock and never moves.
 

Adelheid1976

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Sep 19, 2022
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So a Rosea is like having a pet rock? Huh, I'm glad we didn't get one then. I already know they aren't interested in a G Pulchra (that's a Brazilian black, right?) but I will have to look into the Brachypelma family!
 

JonnyTorch

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I will have to look into the Brachypelma family!
Just watch out for the urticating hairs, they can shoot hairs in the air when they are nervous. Just don't go touching them. But all new world tarantulas mentioned above can do that, just Brachypelma does it more so than others. Brachypelma can be a pet rock sometimes too, less of one than my Rosea, but at least they're very pretty :)
 

Cmac2111

Arachnopeon
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Jan 23, 2021
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22
Agree 100% with what's stated above. I've found Brachy's to be much bigger hair kickers than some of the other 'beginner friendly' tarantula species like Aphonopelma or Grammostola. Mind you, that's just personal experience... every spider is an individual and can defy expectation. Sorry for your loss, looks like you were given some really crappy info to begin with! Just follow the advice from the experienced keepers on here from now on and you'll be sweet... glad to see this experience hasn't turned you away from keeping tarantulas, it's a really cool animal to own when cared for and respected properly, and it'd be a massive shame to see one more keeper lost to bad advice. Also, A Chalcodes is a wonderful spider, a real understated beauty in my opinion, but be aware that younger specimens will take an age to get big (as in your kid will be 10 years older before that youngster reaches adulthood if it's a female), and larger specimens are often wild caught...
 
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Pmurinushmacla

Arachnobaron
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Just watch out for the urticating hairs, they can shoot hairs in the air when they are nervous. Just don't go touching them. But all new world tarantulas mentioned above can do that, just Brachypelma does it more so than others. Brachypelma can be a pet rock sometimes too, less of one than my Rosea, but at least they're very pretty :)
You do mean flick off hairs right? I know some people thought they shot out hairs on command when asking about my spiders lol.
 

JonnyTorch

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You do mean flick off hairs right? I know some people thought they shot out hairs on command when asking about my spiders lol.
Yes. Same thing. They flick hairs, or shoot them, just like humans can flick boogers or shoot them... Lol. I say "shoot" because technically they do it as a projectile toward their threat, a bullet, being shot, is a projectile as well. But oh well, semantics.
 

Pmurinushmacla

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Yes. Same thing. They flick hairs, or shoot them, just like humans can flick boogers or shoot them... Lol. I say "shoot" because technically they do it as a projectile toward their threat, a bullet, being shot, is a projectile as well. But oh well, semantics.
Ah ok. When I hear shoot I think more self propelled.
 

The Grym Reaper

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Chilean Rose Hair (because ALL the videos and guides said they were the best)
They're pretty bulletproof in terms of care but they're basically pet rocks with such slow metabolisms that it makes them extremely easy to overfeed which results in them refusing to eat for anything up to two years at a time (an adult only really needs to eat like 8 times a year).

We were also watching a video from Exotics Lair on Youtube
Do yourself a favour and stop watching his videos immediately. Literally the only YouTuber worth watching outside of the documentary-style channels is Tom Moran (people will say "But Dave's Little Beasties/Tarantula Collective" but neither of them are consistent enough with the quality of the info they provide for my liking).

The thread below contains a ton of great resources written by keepers with decades of experience between them and is well worth a read.

 

ThatsUnpossible

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Jun 27, 2019
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So a Rosea is like having a pet rock? Huh, I'm glad we didn't get one then. I already know they aren't interested in a G Pulchra (that's a Brazilian black, right?) but I will have to look into the Brachypelma family!
Don't forget to look at A chalcodes, they're adorable imo 🥰
 

DuneElliot

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Aug 18, 2022
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Do yourself a favour and stop watching his videos immediately. Literally the only YouTuber worth watching outside of the documentary-style channels is Tom Moran (people will say "But Dave's Little Beasties/Tarantula Collective" but neither of them are consistent enough with the quality of the info they provide for my liking).
I think using MULTIPLE resources for research is the best way to learn and gain the best information. AB is great...amazing, as is Tom Moran. I don't discount the others either but it's all a line of information in my research book.
 

Matt Man

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another side bar on Grammastola. The rosea was always called a 'great starter' because of their disposition. Then owners found a small fraction of them (roughly 10%) were psycho.
Through a rough poll among owners, I found this trait seems to exist across the genus. So when buying any Grammastola, you have a 1/10 chance (+/-) of getting a nutter.
My G. pulchripes is one of them, my daughters pulchra is typical
 

Vulash

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another side bar on Grammastola. The rosea was always called a 'great starter' because of their disposition. Then owners found a small fraction of them (roughly 10%) were psycho.
Through a rough poll among owners, I found this trait seems to exist across the genus. So when buying any Grammastola, you have a 1/10 chance (+/-) of getting a nutter.
My G. pulchripes is one of them, my daughters pulchra is typical
We should start a "nutter" swap because I like them feisty (Joking about the swap)
 

JonnyTorch

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So first step in the remodel is complete- added more substrate! Does this look like a better distance to prevent falls?
You can probably take it down a bit like another inch, or pack it down a bit. That's looking like the legspan of an adult if it's stretched out from the dirt to the top, go for 1.5x the legspan. If you get an adult, it will be fine if you do. That way you can see a bit more of the tank, but that is looking much safer. That direction + acrylic lid is great. Looking good.
 
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