What bug?

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
118
What is an good enclosure for the snails? exo terra faunarium, wann keep the kost low but they seem pretty cheap, have two sizer large or m that i could buy


which one is better Medium - 30 x 19,5 x 20,5 cm Large - 37 x 22 x 25 cm
A faunarium is a good option, medium is fine for the snails you’ll find
 

Scorpio420

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2020
Messages
77
how do i make sure there are no pesticides on the food?
get a centipede. They don't eat often, they eat like 2 crickets a week.
Or you could get a dune scorpion. All you need is sand and a rock. They sometimes go with food for months.
 

chanda

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2010
Messages
1,894
Ok i talked, she is tired af so isnt in the mood to talk rn, she avoides the talks generally but idc, she said it is bc my dad (stepdad)
wasnt ok with the sticks at the beggining, but they were already here and i loved them so he couldnt take them away

But my dad is still standing with the point "No i dont want all of those bugs in my house.

but my mom is ok with catching them so if i want to make my collection bigger that is my only choice, shoud i do it? is it worth it?
Can i house multiple species in the same enclosure.?
i will hunt all day for those snails if it is worth it @ColeopteraC
You need to pick your moment. When your mom is tired - or scared or stressed or anxious or not feeling well or just generally in a bad mood - is not the time to approach her, because she is a lot less likely to be open minded if she's already preoccupied with other concerns. She is more likely to just shut you down with a blanket "No!" at those times - and if you continue to nag or pester her about it, that will just make her that much more adamant. Take your time. Wait until the current round of "No" has blown over and make sure she is in a good mood before approaching her again.

An alternative you might consider - now that spring is springing - is to start looking at your outside bugs without necessarily bringing them indoors. Involve your sister if you can - and if she's old enough. If you guys are out of school and stuck with stay-at-home restrictions, like my own kids are, it could be something fun and educational that you could do together - while simultaneously furthering your bug-keeping agenda. Go outside and look for bugs. Take pictures of them. Observe them. Maybe you and your sister could keep a bug journal together, documenting what you see. When you go back inside, look them up and identify them and try to learn more about them. If you don't have field guides, there are lots of online resources where you can try to identify them yourself - or request identifications here or somewhere like https://www.reddit.com/r/whatsthisbug/ and people will be glad to help you. Share the cool bugs you find with your parents by showing them the pictures or telling them things you've learned about them.

This allows you to pursue your hobby without bringing the bugs into the house - which your stepdad currently objects to. It also provides an opportunity for you to educate your sister and parents about the bugs around them. People fear what they do not understand. The more they learn about the bugs, the less they will be afraid of them - and the more they may come to appreciate their unique adaptations. Fear can turn into curiosity and appreciation surprisingly quickly through safe, non-threatening exposure and education.

Also, as a parent, I can say that if there is a hobby or interest that brings my kids together and makes them want to educate themselves about something, I am more likely to be supportive than if it's just one of my kids saying "I want it." If you can get your sister over her fear of bugs, and maybe even get her interested in keeping a few as pets, it will help you to have an ally instead of another opponent. Be patient. Take your time. Don't force the issue. And appreciate the bugs around you - in your yard, your garden, your local parks or hiking trails - in the meantime.

get a centipede. They don't eat often, they eat like 2 crickets a week.
Or you could get a dune scorpion. All you need is sand and a rock. They sometimes go with food for months.
It doesn't sound like venomous animals like centipedes or scorpions would be acceptable options to the parents, given their general fear of bugs.
 

Scorpio420

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2020
Messages
77
It doesn't sound like venomous animals like centipedes or scorpions would be acceptable options to the parents, given their general fear of bugs.
well a dune scorpion is less than a bee sting, for example. He could argue it stays in a hole all day and would not be seen by them.
 

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
70
well a dune scorpion is less than a bee sting, for example. He could argue it stays in a hole all day and would not be seen by them.
if a 4 year old got stung by it it will be the end of worlds
You need to pick your moment. When your mom is tired - or scared or stressed or anxious or not feeling well or just generally in a bad mood - is not the time to approach her, because she is a lot less likely to be open minded if she's already preoccupied with other concerns. She is more likely to just shut you down with a blanket "No!" at those times - and if you continue to nag or pester her about it, that will just make her that much more adamant. Take your time. Wait until the current round of "No" has blown over and make sure she is in a good mood before approaching her again.

An alternative you might consider - now that spring is springing - is to start looking at your outside bugs without necessarily bringing them indoors. Involve your sister if you can - and if she's old enough. If you guys are out of school and stuck with stay-at-home restrictions, like my own kids are, it could be something fun and educational that you could do together - while simultaneously furthering your bug-keeping agenda. Go outside and look for bugs. Take pictures of them. Observe them. Maybe you and your sister could keep a bug journal together, documenting what you see. When you go back inside, look them up and identify them and try to learn more about them. If you don't have field guides, there are lots of online resources where you can try to identify them yourself - or request identifications here or somewhere like https://www.reddit.com/r/whatsthisbug/ and people will be glad to help you. Share the cool bugs you find with your parents by showing them the pictures or telling them things you've learned about them.

This allows you to pursue your hobby without bringing the bugs into the house - which your stepdad currently objects to. It also provides an opportunity for you to educate your sister and parents about the bugs around them. People fear what they do not understand. The more they learn about the bugs, the less they will be afraid of them - and the more they may come to appreciate their unique adaptations. Fear can turn into curiosity and appreciation surprisingly quickly through safe, non-threatening exposure and education.

Also, as a parent, I can say that if there is a hobby or interest that brings my kids together and makes them want to educate themselves about something, I am more likely to be supportive than if it's just one of my kids saying "I want it." If you can get your sister over her fear of bugs, and maybe even get her interested in keeping a few as pets, it will help you to have an ally instead of another opponent. Be patient. Take your time. Don't force the issue. And appreciate the bugs around you - in your yard, your garden, your local parks or hiking trails - in the meantime.
Thanks for all the help!

And my mom explained why she is ok with snails but scared of anything else, they walk fast and are unpredictable
that is why she is even more scared of flying insects and EVEN MOREEEE scared of butterfly's

we have guidelines like not more than 3 people on visit with still 1.5 metres distance and no group forming and you will gat fines if you just still do it, so i can go outside but it is not optimal
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
118
well a dune scorpion is less than a bee sting, for example. He could argue it stays in a hole all day and would not be seen by them.
His parents seem dead set on not allowing any tropical inverts in their home due to their apparent entomophobia and arachnophobia, arguing will get him nowhere, if he can’t persuade them to allow giant land snails in the house then the likelihood of a scorp seems pretty low...

The solution @chanda suggests is the best, it’ll both educate his sister and his parents that inverts are wonderful creatures not to be feared, create a great bonding opportunity and enable him to pursue his interests without the reliance of his families permission.
 

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
70
His parents seem dead set on not allowing any tropical inverts in their home due to their apparent entomophobia and arachnophobia, arguing will get him nowhere, if he can’t persuade them to allow giant land snails in the house then the likelihood of a scorp seems pretty low...

The solution @chanda suggests is the best, it’ll both educate his sister and his parents that inverts are wonderful creatures not to be feared, create a great bonding opportunity and enable him to pursue his interests without the reliance of his families permission.
i have this light yellow white beige tint moss looking stuff and it SMELLS REALLY STRONG, Is it safe for garden snails? WIN_20200326_13_16_39_Pro.jpg
need reaction ASAP

i have this light yellow white beige tint moss looking stuff and it SMELLS REALLY STRONG, Is it safe for garden snails? WIN_20200326_13_16_39_Pro.jpg
need reaction ASAP
and can they have coco fiber substarte?

AND i found 4 but the 3 big ones have a translucent layer on their opening and wont come out
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
118
Coco fibre is fine as a substrate, the lichen (type of fungus, the strong smelling stuff) you have looks fine as decor. The big ones have made a mucus membrane on the opening of the shell, usually due to lack of rain or suitable weather. They should still be alive and the the humidity in the tank will awaken them
 

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
70
Coco fibre is fine as a substrate, the lichen (type of fungus, the strong smelling stuff) you have looks fine as decor. The big ones have made a mucus membrane on the opening of the shell, usually due to lack of rain or suitable weather. They should still be alive and the the humidity in the tank will awaken them
ok ill update in an hour or so

Coco fibre is fine as a substrate, the lichen (type of fungus, the strong smelling stuff) you have looks fine as decor. The big ones have made a mucus membrane on the opening of the shell, usually due to lack of rain or suitable weather. They should still be alive and the the humidity in the tank will awaken them
but what about the snails with an layer of something over their opening
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
118
but what about the snails with an layer of something over their opening
Sorry if the previous post was unclear, they’ve formed a mucus membrane. Usually due to lack of suitable weather, the moisture in your enclosure should awaken them.
 

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
70
Unsure, maybe about a day or so... I’ve not seen an average, there should be nothing to worry about though, they’ll come out.
the small snails is SPEEDING to the ceiling and wont come away from there ill give an update when the big guys get out
 

Carthropod

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
70
he already reacted, it was looking like he was talking about the big fungus dont give reactions to messages that are already solved
read.the.response.
Unsure, maybe about a day or so... I’ve not seen an average, there should be nothing to worry about though, they’ll come out.
one of the big got out!, idk the species but there is one ''typical garden '' Cepaea nemoralis (not waken up yet), it there are two who have the same opening but the rest of the shells lack all of the patterns WIN_20200326_19_24_33_Pro.jpg

Pattern lacking ^^

one of the big got out!, idk the species but there is one ''typical garden '' Cepaea nemoralis (not waken up yet), it there are two who have the same opening but the rest of the shells lack all of the patterns WIN_20200326_19_24_33_Pro.jpg

Pattern lacking ^^
is this the same species?
 
Top