what are these small white things?!

DeathMarch6

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I have found these very small white bugs on eaten crickets in my T enclosures. I fed my T's 3 days ago then went to check on them and basically there's mini white insect things moving on the dead crickets. There's none on my T's though

I have obviously removed the dead crickets and watered and fed them all again. The photo isn't that clear but they are so small it's difficult to get a clear pic. Any help on what they could be would be massively appreciated
 

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14pokies

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Scavenger Mites.. In high numbers they can irritate your T but they aren't much of a problem.
 

DeathMarch6

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Thank you! I was worried. So they should be fine and cause no problem? Have you had these and how did they get in there?
Scavenger Mites.. In high numbers they can irritate your T but they aren't much of a problem.
ank

Just did a bit more research I think they are spring tails as one jumped and apparently mites can't jump so hopefully they are spring tails!
 
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boina

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White specks may be mites or springtails. Springtails are more long and mites are more round. Both come though the air in form of eggs. Anyway, it looks very wet in that enclosure. Unless you have a seriously moisture loving species in there (Theraphosa or something asian) it's probably too wet. Those conditions may lead to mite and fungus outbreaks and weaken the spider and make it succeptible to all kinds of bacteria that incidentally thrive in wet and warm conditions.
 

DeathMarch6

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Just did a bit more research I think they are spring tails as one jumped and apparently mites can't jump so hopefully they are spring tails
White specks may be mites or springtails. Springtails are more long and mites are more round. Both come though the air in form of eggs. Anyway, it looks very wet in that enclosure. Unless you have a seriously moisture loving species in there (Theraphosa or something asian) it's probably too wet. Those conditions may lead to mite and fungus outbreaks and weaken the spider and make it succeptible to all kinds of bacteria that incidentally thrive in wet and warm conditions.
That's my Red Rump sling enclosure. It's not as wet as it looks in the picture also it burrows a lot I just mist lightly to keep humidity same for my LP sling. They seem very content, also I'm sure they are spring tails then as they resemble a minuscule white worm lol
 

The Grym Reaper

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Can't tell from the pic but if they're long and thin in shape then they're springtails and are actually beneficial, I randomly ended up with them in my scorpion's enclosure at the start of winter, I've since introduced them into all of my enclosures that will support them (they thrive in moist conditions), they're detritivores (meaning they only eat decaying plant/animal matter) and also help to prevent mite infestations as they outcompete them for food.



If they're tiny and round then they're probably scavenger or grain mites which can be a nuisance if you have a population explosion but if dry out the enclosures and they'll die off/go dormant.

 
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DeathMarch6

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Can't tell from the pic but if they're long and thin in shape then they're springtails and are actually beneficial, I randomly ended up with them in my scorpion's enclosure at the start of winter, I've since introduced them into all of my enclosures that will support them (they thrive in moist conditions), they're detritivores (meaning they only eat decaying plant/animal matter) and also help to prevent mite infestations as they outcompete them for food.

If they're tiny and round then they're probably scavenger or grain mites which can be a nuisance if you have a population explosion but if dry out the enclosures and they'll die off/go dormant.
Definitely sounds like I have Spring Tails then, thank you very much!
 

viper69

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I have found these very small white bugs on eaten crickets in my T enclosures. I fed my T's 3 days ago then went to check on them and basically there's mini white insect things moving on the dead crickets. There's none on my T's though
Who knows what they are, the white objects aren't in focus. Could be mites, could be an insect.

and also help to prevent mite infestations as they outcompete them for food
Now that I did not know. I have not come across this at all, very interesting- thanks!
 
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nathan haydon

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What are the little white things anyone know? They don’t seem to be moving, there is tiny tiny ones that move fast and like the water dish , but the bigger round things are new. Should I be worried and re house or just try to dry out the enclosure
 

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cold blood

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What are the little white things anyone know? They don’t seem to be moving, there is tiny tiny ones that move fast and like the water dish , but the bigger round things are new. Should I be worried and re house or just try to dry out the enclosure
looks like a salamander enclosure....dry that up!
 

Teal

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What are the little white things anyone know? They don’t seem to be moving, there is tiny tiny ones that move fast and like the water dish , but the bigger round things are new. Should I be worried and re house or just try to dry out the enclosure
They almost look like fruit fly casings...
 

boina

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What species do you have in there?

Whatever it is that's seriously too wet, even for the most moisture loving species.

And whatever the white specks are they are much less of a problem than your excess moisture.
 

nathan haydon

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I am new to taking care of Ts, so thanks for the advice I have dealt With the moisture and I’ll keep it lower from now on. I didn’t notice any distress with
My t, ( hanging on walls or avoiding the ground) so I didn’t think there was a problem,
I have a Curley hair in there.
 

Keke713

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I am new to taking care of Ts, so thanks for the advice I have dealt With the moisture and I’ll keep it lower from now on. I didn’t notice any distress with
My t, ( hanging on walls or avoiding the ground) so I didn’t think there was a problem,
I have a Curley hair in there.
Post a pic of entire enclosure as that sub looks very concerning for a Brachypelma albopilosum (curly hair).
 

nathan haydon

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I have already changed the substraight to make it dryer, also my T didn’t show any signs of distress. Been eating very well molted with no problems twice and doesn’t do anything like avoid the ground , but as I have said I am new and won’t mist as heavily anymore,
 
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