What are premolt sign's?

Shadrach

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
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Jan 2, 2003
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51
OK many of you know I just bought my first T and naturally I've got a question, hehe.

1. What would be some signs of a premolt?

The reason why I ask this is my little girl has spun what seems to be for a lack of better word's a mat on top of her substrate right in front of her hide log that extend's into the log under her. Is this something they naturally do anyway? Say like trip wire's or something? Also so you know she has not stopped eating she still pounces on every cricket that I drop in there.
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
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Sep 27, 2002
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1,258
What species of T is she?

The matt-laying is often associated with preparing to molt, but some will lay down web just because. In New world T's, if they've been hair-kickers, you can often see the abdomen visibly darken. Some things to look for, include loss of appetite, excessive hair kicking for no reason, and possibly sluggish movements. It differs with each species, and some you don't have much in the way of signs before they do, (my Psalmopeous irminia ate yesterday, molted last night, for example)

Anyways, being new to keeping T's, I'd definately reccommend you get the book 'The tarantula keepers guide' by Stan and Marguerite Schultz. It's incredibly informative, and worded to where alot of the more scientific details are easy enough to follow. There are other books, the only other one I see reccommended even half as much is 'Tarantulas and other Arachnids' by Marshall. (I think) The aforementioned book will answer almost every newbie question you might have, and just plain makes good interesting reading material. You should be able to find it at most major bookstores.

Bill
 

Shadrach

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
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Jan 2, 2003
Messages
51
Sorry about that she's a Rose Hair. Also I 've got the Tarantulas and other Arachnids by Marshall. But after keeping herps for the past 10 years I know that they don't always write down everything that we in the general public may encounter during keeping these wonderful animals.
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
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Sep 27, 2002
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I'll agree to that, definately. In fact, in the last chapter of the book I mentioned, Schultz says the same, and lists some (possible outdated) places on the internet to look around. From what I and others have said in the past, usually rose hair's go a long time without eating before molting. You may want to keep an eye on her, and not leave crickets in for more than a day if they are not eaten.

Bill
 
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