What are good beginner spiders?

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
I just started keeping spiders and I was wondering what are some good beginner spiders I could pick up in the near future. I have a female adult Phidippus Regius as my first spider and although she gave me a bit of a scare with an unexpected molt I am looking to expand my collection. At first I was thinking about a trapdoor spider but then I thought that perhaps such notoriously defensive spiders wouldn't be my best option for second spider. I made a thread asking about orb weavers, as they really intrigued me, but then learned that it's better to feed them moths and flys. I don't really have a ready supply available so I'm going to have to put that on hold for now. I was also thinking about a tailless whip scorpion but I just found out that they are rather skittish, nocturnal and (in my opinion) not that exciting.

What does everyone think? Should i just go for the whip scorpion or are their more options?
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,828
But of course a lovely, innocent, fast as hell huge Heteropoda venatoria! Only an evildoer would dislike one of those eight legged puppy :kiss:
 

HybridReplicate

Spectrostatic
Joined
Jan 26, 2017
Messages
107
Yup, old good EulersK vids are always of best. But he asked for those arachnids called 'true spiders' :-s
Oh, for goodness sake. Clearly I wasn't paying attention. Still good vids, worth watching, particularly for the breakdown of what makes a spider a good beginner species.
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
But of course a lovely, innocent, fast as hell huge Heteropoda venatoria! Only an evildoer would dislike one of those eight legged puppy :kiss:
Oh man hahaha. Huntsman is an interesting choice because I've only ever seen one that scared the crap out of my child self. I know they're not baddies but I must admit I still live with parents and one of the few reasons I was able to convince mom to let me buy a jumping spider was the size. Are their any smaller species??

Oh, for goodness sake. Clearly I wasn't paying attention. Still good vids, worth watching, particularly for the breakdown of what makes a spider a good beginner species.
No worries! you were just trying to help and that's what I'm here for! I actually watched the EulersK video a while back, both the video and the man himself was super informative and so was the other video you posted. Thank you.

Holconia immanis, Heteropoda davidbowie, Hogna spp., Pardosa spp., Deinopis spp., etc.
Can you tell me what, in your opinion, makes these spiders good candidates??
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,059
I made a thread asking about orb weavers, as they really intrigued me, but then learned that it's better to feed them moths and flys. I don't really have a ready supply available so I'm going to have to put that on hold for now.
If you like webbers, almost anything but an orbweaver is easy to keep. Just provide lots of anchor points and a place to hide. And the best part about them is that you can collect your own for free.

My favorite web-dwelling true spiders to keep are Kukulcania hibernalis. They live for many years, unlike most other true spiders, and are not picky eaters.

I also enjoy theridiids (cobweb spiders).
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,828
Oh man hahaha. Huntsman is an interesting choice because I've only ever seen one that scared the crap out of my child self. I know they're not baddies but I must admit I still live with parents and one of the few reasons I was able to convince mom to let me buy a jumping spider was the size. Are their any smaller species??
Ah ah :kiss:

I suggest to look Lycosidae, the so called 'wolf spiders'. Their size should match what you are searching, they aren't defensive (IMO). Easy to care.

Damn one of my fav. is Segestria florentina, lives in the wild here in Italy, but I highly doubt that you will find one for sale in the U.S (uh, never say never but). Striking looking, bite is annoying and unpleasant, still nothing serious :rolleyes:
 

Arachnomaniac19

Arachnolord
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Messages
654
Oh man hahaha. Huntsman is an interesting choice because I've only ever seen one that scared the crap out of my child self. I know they're not baddies but I must admit I still live with parents and one of the few reasons I was able to convince mom to let me buy a jumping spider was the size. Are their any smaller species??



No worries! you were just trying to help and that's what I'm here for! I actually watched the EulersK video a while back, both the video and the man himself was super informative and so was the other video you posted. Thank you.



Can you tell me what, in your opinion, makes these spiders good candidates??
I find them interesting and easy to care for.
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
If you like webbers, almost anything but an orbweaver is easy to keep. Just provide lots of anchor points and a place to hide. And the best part about them is that you can collect your own for free.

My favorite web-dwelling true spiders to keep are Kukulcania hibernalis. They live for many years, unlike most other true spiders, and are not picky eaters.

I also enjoy theridiids (cobweb spiders).
Oooh! The Southern House Spider has me intrigued. I love the way it looks and the size would not put my mother into cardiac arrest. What do you feed them? Unfortunately my parents had the house sprayed for spiders years ago and It's been too long since I've seen one :arghh: Those cowbweb spiders look small. How big do they get and waht are they fed?

Ah ah :kiss:

I suggest to look Lycosidae, the so called 'wolf spiders'. Their size should match what you are searching, they aren't defensive (IMO). Easy to care.

Damn one of my fav. is Segestria florentina, lives in the wild here in Italy, but I highly doubt that you will find one for sale in the U.S (uh, never say never but). Striking looking, bite is annoying and unpleasant, still nothing serious :rolleyes:
Wolf spiders are actually pretty common where I live and I was thinking about trying to catch one once they start to come out. I noticed that you said they weren't defensive in your opinion. What might make others think they are defensive? As for the Segestria florentina: How painful would you rate the bite? I get bitten by a cockatiel daily. Sometimes drawing a drop or two of blood. Would it be more or less painful than this?

By the way, I just looked up a picture of one of those and I love the iridescent chella. What do you feed them?
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,828
Wolf spiders are actually pretty common where I live and I was thinking about trying to catch one once they start to come out. I noticed that you said they weren't defensive in your opinion. What might make others think they are defensive? As for the Segestria florentina: How painful would you rate the bite? I get bitten by a cockatiel daily. Sometimes drawing a drop or two of blood. Would it be more or less painful than this?
Yes, you know man, I always love to put the 'IMO', because what I can consider/view as not defensive, or not so fast, or else etc could be for others the opposite. So I love to remain in the fair enough side :-s

But no, aside for a bit of speedy they (wolf spiders) aren't defensive at all. Yuk, for that matter even L.mactans aren't defensive, even if the bite could be, technically, potentially lethal :)

By the way, I just looked up a picture of one of those and I love the iridescent chella. What do you feed them?
Man they are great... no, I don't have one. I'm too lazy for travel to Toscana (Tuscany region) for search that, but I would take one anytime. I know people that owned those of course :-s

They eat the usual things... above all crickets. Bite is painful, no particular lasting effects (unlike for a L.rufescens, for instance) but still painful. This is what I know, because I've never been tagged by a S.florentina
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
Yes, you know man, I always love to put the 'IMO', because what I can consider/view as not defensive, or not so fast, or else etc could be for others the opposite. So I love to remain in the fair enough side :-s

But no, aside for a bit of speedy they (wolf spiders) aren't defensive at all. Yuk, for that matter even L.mactans aren't defensive, even if the bite could be, technically, potentially lethal :)



Man they are great... no, I don't have one. I'm too lazy for travel to Toscana (Tuscany region) for search that, but I would take one anytime. I know people that owned those of course :-s

They eat the usual things... above all crickets. Bite is painful, no particular lasting effects (unlike for a L.rufescens, for instance) but still painful. This is what I know, because I've never been tagged by a S.florentina
Oh wow! I guess I should have mentioned this beforehand...No spiders with potentially lethal venom! Haha another reason my mother wasn't worried about the Phidippus Regius. I have a blood disorder so venom toxicity is a HUGE factor into my decision.
 

ReignofInvertebrates

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Dec 29, 2012
Messages
1,066
It all depends what you're looking for. If you want something active and less reclusive, I suggest not getting a trapdoor. I personally think any spiders in the family Lycosidae make great beginner spiders, and are readily available for you to find outside or buy. There are some other randoms that I would consider great beginner spiders. Eratigena spp, Kukulcania spp, and a couple of others that are a bit harder to source. I noticed in your post, you said orb weavers are within your interest. Their care is a bit more difficult than you'd imagine, as they need a lot of room to successfully build webs and ultimately survive. A tailless whip would actually be a pretty great option. They make up for being inactive through their absolutely stunning appearance. Highly recommend them.
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
It all depends what you're looking for. If you want something active and less reclusive, I suggest not getting a trapdoor. I personally think any spiders in the family Lycosidae make great beginner spiders, and are readily available for you to find outside or buy. There are some other randoms that I would consider great beginner spiders. Eratigena spp, Kukulcania spp, and a couple of others that are a bit harder to source. I noticed in your post, you said orb weavers are within your interest. Their care is a bit more difficult than you'd imagine, as they need a lot of room to successfully build webs and ultimately survive. A tailless whip would actually be a pretty great option. They make up for being inactive through their absolutely stunning appearance. Highly recommend them.
What conditions would a lycosidae or Kukulcania require? Or an orbweaver? I would like to keep one when the time is right.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,059
Oooh! The Southern House Spider has me intrigued. I love the way it looks and the size would not put my mother into cardiac arrest.
Since my Kukulcania hibernalis are wild-caught, I originally fed them wild-caught prey, but now that I have tarantulas and feeder insects, they get small feeders (crickets or mealworms).

Females max out at around 15-25 mm in body length.


What conditions would a lycosidae or Kukulcania require?
Kukulcania are extremely easy to keep. They tolerate a wide range of temperatures (even a mild freeze) right up to hot southern summers. They just need an enclosure with a hide (they love crevices) and anchor points for webbing. They get most of their water from prey and are very drought-tolerant, but you can provide supplemental water by misting the web.


Those cowbweb spiders look small. How big do they get and waht are they fed?
Size varies by species, but cobweb spiders are generally small spiders.

A true widow (Latrodectus) or false widow (Steatoda) maxes out around 8-13 mm in body length. True widows (except perhaps brown widows) are medically significant and should never be handled.

Common house spiders (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) are smaller at 5-9 mm in body length.

Prey that flutters or jumps works best unless there are trap lines attached to the bottom of the enclosure. Cobweb spiders have a tendency to web near the top of your enclosure, so avoid something like a jar with a lid that unscrews at the top.
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
Since my Kukulcania hibernalis are wild-caught, I originally fed them wild-caught prey, but now that I have tarantulas and feeder insects, they get small feeders (crickets or mealworms).

Females max out at around 15-25 mm in body length.




Kukulcania are extremely easy to keep. They tolerate a wide range of temperatures (even a mild freeze) right up to hot southern summers. They just need an enclosure with a hide (they love crevices) and anchor points for webbing. They get most of their water from prey and are very drought-tolerant, but you can provide supplemental water by misting the web.




Size varies by species, but cobweb spiders are generally small spiders.

A true widow (Latrodectus) or false widow (Steatoda) maxes out around 8-13 mm in body length. True widows (except perhaps brown widows) are medically significant and should never be handled.

Common house spiders (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) are smaller at 5-9 mm in body length.

Prey that flutters or jumps works best unless there are trap lines attached to the bottom of the enclosure. Cobweb spiders have a tendency to web near the top of your enclosure, so avoid something like a jar with a lid that unscrews at the top.
Would you say that the wolf spider needs around the same as a house spider? What do you say that perhaps the brown widow does not have medically significant venom?
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,059
Would you say that the wolf spider needs around the same as a house spider?
Wolf spiders hunt on foot (or from burrows), so their enclosure should be more terrestrial. (You still want to provide a place to hide, however.)


What do you say that perhaps the brown widow does not have medically significant venom?
Source: The Brown Widow in Southern California

Reports have correctly stated that the spider's venom is fairly potent but because the spider injects so little, it is not of major consequence. Yet one hyperbolic report stated that the spider hasn't killed anyone so far. This is not surprising because the brown widow is not a dangerous nor deadly spider. Even though it has venom of high toxicity, this is typically determined with injections of venom into mice or rabbits and conclusions from this are inferred with little real-world relevance. Much more relevant is the effects of actual spider bites. A South African medical journal reports on the bites of 15 brown widows in humans (Muller 1993) . Only two symptoms of brown widow envenomation were reported in the majority of bite victims: 1) pain while being bitten and 2) a mark where the bite occurred. That's it. Not much more. The bite of the brown widow is about the same as any non-poisonous spider. It hurts and leaves a little mark on the skin. It is no big deal. There are none of the serious, protracted symptoms that one would exhibit when bitten by a black widow. So even though the non-native brown widow is virtually harmless, it is getting all this publicity and people are concerned about it. . . . The brown widow is not a spider of medical concern and is not likely to become one.​
 

Socfroggy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
297
Wolf spiders hunt on foot (or from burrows), so their enclosure should be more terrestrial. (You still want to provide a place to hide, however.)
I guess what I meant to ask is what how big of an enclosure would the house and wolf spider need?
 
Top