What about hornworms?

XzotticAnimal420

Arachnosquire
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Jul 8, 2010
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So whats up with these hornworms? I see them in the LPS sometimes. Im not sure if they are the exact type as the one I pictured..Can I feed them to my T's?


 

Miss Bianca

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I've done it, feeding them to larger tarantulas, with no ill effects...

The meal is a messy one though..
and you have to make sure to clean up any remains...
these are better to keep/observe/breed..
Definitely not a staple food..
 

XzotticAnimal420

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Jul 8, 2010
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Thanks. I figured it'd be messy, I mean look at the size of them! lol. I would probably only try feeding them to my L. parahybana...
 

Aschamne

Arachnobaron
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May 23, 2007
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I have tried feeding them to a couple of my larger Ts, but they just tend to be ignored. Now reptiles on the other hand seem to love them.

Art
 

sharpfang

Arachnoangel
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Aug 20, 2009
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This worm is Horny

As long as...They have Not consumed Tomato Leaves = makes them Toxic......I learned that the hard way w/ Chameleons years back :( - Jason
 

Bill S

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As long as...They have Not consumed Tomato Leaves = makes them Toxic......I learned that the hard way w/ Chameleons years back :( - Jason
I'd actually take that warning a step further. In the wild these caterpillars feed on many types of solanaceous plants (tomato, tobacco and nightshade family). They can absorb and sequester the toxins from the leaves of these plants, which can in turn poison animals that eat the caterpillars. If the caterpillars are raised on non-toxic plants they would make fine food - but if you catch wild ones you're taking quite a chance. Depending on how much toxin the caterpillar has absorbed, a predator may survive eating one or two worms, but might not.
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
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Jul 2, 2010
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283
I'll throw another thought out there for what it's worth . . . I've raised many caterpillars into butterflies and moths (that one actually becomes a pretty cool moth), so for me this question is similar to asking: "can I feed this tarantula to my pet bird?" :evil:

My take is, if it's not raised to become food for the pet . . . . why feed it to them?
 

Vespula

Arachnodemon
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Jul 27, 2010
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I don't think it'd be worth it. They're messy, and they can be poisonous, as has been stated. So, they're more of a pet, not petfood. :D
 

Jaymz Bedell

Arachnoknight
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Dec 19, 2009
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As mentioned wild hornworms feed on solanaceous plants and sequester the toxins from those plants.

Captive raised hornworms fed hornworm chow are harmless, can be great feeders, grow fast for feeding those big boys, and come in several sizes.

I find one or two hornworms on my tomato plants every summer, and many times they're covered in parasitic wasp eggs. which is sad cuz a 4 inch long bright green or blue caterpillar is just an awesome sight. but then again they're on my tomatoes and I work very hard to have a veggie garden that provides all summer, with some spoils that last through most of the winter as well. double edged blade for me. but they're still gorgeous creatures.
 
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