What’s Your Favorite Haplo/Cyriopagopus sp.?

ShinyTurd

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 6, 2019
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15
I am a big fan of cyrios/haplos!!
My fav would be an Bach Ma but budget doesn't allow atm.

I own 2 females:

Cyriopagopus sp "hati hati"
Cyriopagopus Lividus

Not sure if this counts hahaha

Omothymus Schioedtei
I really like this one as well, and got a sac as a surprise!
 

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Enceladus

Arachnopeon
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Aug 14, 2019
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8
Unfortunately, no earlier pics. A typical Asian fossorial, I put it in its enclosure as a sling (about .5”) and aside from seeing the front four legs pretty regularly, I didn’t see it emerge fully until I took this picture at about 2”.
No problem, totally understandable!
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoprince
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Jul 11, 2016
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1,260
Gah, stop it with the beautiful pics! I don't need another tarantula! I really don't! I don't, I don't, I...y'know, forget this, it's too late. I need another tarantula :shifty:.

Thanks a lot y'all,

Arthroverts
 

chris0220

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
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15
Hati hati because it is the only one I currently own but also because I like saying hati hati.
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
Old Timer
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Oct 2, 2004
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2,170
Haplopelma minax maybe. Or are they Cyriopagopus minax?

Also Cyriopagopus doriae looks very sweet, atleast adult femsles!
 

basin79

Arachnoemperor
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Haplopelma minax maybe. Or are they Cyriopagopus minax?

Also Cyriopagopus doriae looks very sweet, atleast adult femsles!
Doriae are phenomenal. My lass will come out to feed but bloody hell she doesn't like her photo being taken. These are the best I've managed.

 

Enceladus

Arachnopeon
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Aug 14, 2019
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Doriae are phenomenal. My lass will come out to feed but bloody hell she doesn't like her photo being taken. These are the best I've managed.

Wow those are GORGEOUS. LOVE how deep that black color is with just a hint of orange. I've never seen this species before (very very new to the hobby).
 

basin79

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Wow those are GORGEOUS. LOVE how deep that black color is with just a hint of orange. I've never seen this species before (very very new to the hobby).
They're bonny tarantulas (although all tarantulas are) all right. I'll hopefully get some better pics of her some day.
 

Teds ts and Inverts

Arachnobaron
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Nov 10, 2017
Messages
320
More pics that I managed to get of these ones....

Cyriopagopus lividus (Cobalt Blue):
upload_2020-1-11_13-4-10.jpeg

Cyriopagopus albostriatus (Thai Zebra):
upload_2020-1-11_13-4-52.jpeg

Oops, forgot this one....

Cyriopagopus albostriatus (Thai Zebra):

Didn’t load fully before I hit ‘Post’. Jeez.... Take 3:

Cyriopagopus albostriatus (Thai Zebra):
upload_2020-1-11_13-13-44.jpeg
 
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MikeofBorg

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Dec 12, 2017
Messages
90
2E3B6877-8039-4590-937E-5AF80389C359.jpeg
Love my MF C. lividus. She quite the pistol. Added this fake rock hide and she went terrestrial on me. Has not made a burrow since I added it.
 

KenD

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Joined
Aug 18, 2019
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9
I've never seen either IRL, but going by pictures C. sp hati hati and C. lividus are fairly similar in appearance. Is this correct? (and I do apologize if I've managed to offend anyone with a special fondness for either species or the genus as a whole ) If that's the case, are there any specific reasons why you'd choose one species over the other, behavioural or otherwise?
 

MikeofBorg

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Dec 12, 2017
Messages
90
I've never seen either IRL, but going by pictures C. sp hati hati and C. lividus are fairly similar in appearance. Is this correct? (and I do apologize if I've managed to offend anyone with a special fondness for either species or the genus as a whole ) If that's the case, are there any specific reasons why you'd choose one species over the other, behavioural or otherwise?
On behavior they both act the same, very defensive if disturbed. They are similar in appearance except the Cobalt Blue has a gray cephalothorax. Both can be pet holes. But they are awesome looking Ts when they out and about. However a bite from either species can ruin a few days for you. Their venom is much more potent than tarantulas from North, Central and South America. Unless you have an underlying medical condition a bite is not life threatening, but it is a very painful and uncomfortable feeling from what I have read. Never had a T bite me yet. But, I have been stung by my bee colonies quite a bit. Being stung by a bee on the face sucks and the swelling lasts about 24 hours. I can only imagine what a bite from a C. lividus feels like and how long the effects of the venom lasts.
 

KenD

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Aug 18, 2019
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On behavior they both act the same, very defensive if disturbed. They are similar in appearance except the Cobalt Blue has a gray cephalothorax. Both can be pet holes. But they are awesome looking Ts when they out and about. However a bite from either species can ruin a few days for you. Their venom is much more potent than tarantulas from North, Central and South America. Unless you have an underlying medical condition a bite is not life threatening, but it is a very painful and uncomfortable feeling from what I have read. Never had a T bite me yet. But, I have been stung by my bee colonies quite a bit. Being stung by a bee on the face sucks and the swelling lasts about 24 hours. I can only imagine what a bite from a C. lividus feels like and how long the effects of the venom lasts.
Thanks! I have a couple of pokies and a couple of baboons so have some experience with fast and/or defensive species. I haven't dealt with moisture dependent species yet, though, but I'm starting to feel ready to give that a try. Been eyeing Cyriopagopus sp for a while now, so I'm sure a spider of that genus is in my near future, as soon as I can decide which species I want
Oh, and bites, that's something I very carefully try to avoid. My dad's a beekeeper so I got a good education in respecting venomous things that sting or bite (and to exaggeratedly fear anything that has wings and sounds like it might have a stinger...) in my childhood Bees are bad enough... Came across a report where a woman bitten by a pokie said that giving birth was nothing in comparison - not an experience I'm eager to have so I keep my fingers well out of reach of any old worlds (and new worlds as well, because why not)
 

MikeofBorg

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Dec 12, 2017
Messages
90
Thanks! I have a couple of pokies and a couple of baboons so have some experience with fast and/or defensive species. I haven't dealt with moisture dependent species yet, though, but I'm starting to feel ready to give that a try. Been eyeing Cyriopagopus sp for a while now, so I'm sure a spider of that genus is in my near future, as soon as I can decide which species I want
Oh, and bites, that's something I very carefully try to avoid. My dad's a beekeeper so I got a good education in respecting venomous things that sting or bite (and to exaggeratedly fear anything that has wings and sounds like it might have a stinger...) in my childhood Bees are bad enough... Came across a report where a woman bitten by a pokie said that giving birth was nothing in comparison - not an experience I'm eager to have so I keep my fingers well out of reach of any old worlds (and new worlds as well, because why not)
For my C. lividus moisture requirements I put some 1/4 plastic screen on top of some stones in the bottom of the enclosure before I put substrate in. I put a 1/2 PVC pipe with a notch cut in the bottom that ran below the screen. The stones give a gap of about 1.5 inches at the very bottom. I fill that gap with water until it touches the substrate using the PVC pipe to fill it. This keeps the substrate humid but not overly wet. She has a water dish but I have never seen her drink from it. She seems to prefer I mist her enclosure so she can drink water off the live plants in with her. I let the water in the bottom get low then I refill it. She has been this way 3 years now and it seems to be working. The live plants also help to maintain enclosure humidity. Her enclosure is bioactive, springtails, red worms, nightcrawlers and pillbugs all live with her. She loves taking down nightcrawlers for a snack. The red worms I think are not worth her time being so small.
 
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