Urticating setae ranking

Matttoadman

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So I have begun researching my second t. I have been reading a lot about the urticating hairs. If you were to rank the Nhandu, Pamphobeteues and Lasiadora genus as far as flicking and irritation levels how would they stack? I seem to be sensitive to fiberglass, cactus glochidis, poison ivy etc. should I avoid these?
 

Moonohol

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I only have experience with Lasiodora hairs. They suck. For me, the bumpy/scaly skin was worse than the itching and I was able to manage it with moisturizing lotion. Still, not fun.
 

EulersK

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The answer will vary wildly depending on the person. Some are affected worse than others. Nhandu is the worst out of those you listed in my opinion, but others swear Lasiodora is worse than a Theraphosa.
 

Matttoadman

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Does daily maintanence , feeding watering, get you haired? Or mainly rehousing?
 

Ellenantula

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The answer will vary wildly depending on the person. Some are affected worse than others. Nhandu is the worst out of those you listed in my opinion, but others swear Lasiodora is worse than a Theraphosa.
Agreed. Originally was not overly bothered by hairs, but now I have near zero tolerance. Random hair (T did not flick) during some routine maintenance a couple nights ago has put me on Benadryl. Cortaid nor Calamine lotion has helped my symptoms from this last exposure. Repeated exposure has certainly made me super sensitive, don't think what kind of T would matter. :(

I read years ago itching powder (in prank kits) was made from T hair. I could believe that.
 

EulersK

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I read years ago itching powder (in prank kits) was made from T hair. I could believe that.
Can you imagine the minimum wage job to collect that? Some teenage kid with no idea what he got himself into.

"Okay, see that giant spider over there? Her name's Burtha. You're gonna have to poke her with this stick here. Piss her off real good."
 

sdsnybny

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Different factors will effect each person differently. I haven't had to many issues with them till I kept B. boehmi. She is gone now, don't need 3 weeks of itchy, scratching, even after tape, lotion, showers and the works just for maintenance. Funny thing other Brachy's don't seen to bother me as bad as boehmi. There are about 6 different types of UT's and each can effect a person different, kinda trial by fire. I hope my Nhandu and LP don't' bring me trouble.
 

viper69

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I seem to be sensitive to fiberglass, cactus glochidis, poison ivy etc. should I avoid these?
Everyone is different. What does Poison Ivy have to do with tarantula setae, do they activate the same molecular pathways? The same with fiberglass??
 

Matttoadman

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Everyone is different. What does Poison Ivy have to do with tarantula setae, do they activate the same molecular pathways? The same with fiberglass??
Merely the fact that I seem to develop serious negative reactions to irritants. I realize it's apples to oranges but none the less the outcome is the same. Sounds like I just better stay clear or the genus know to flick.
 

Andrea82

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Ladiodora hairs seem to produce a mild reaction on my skin. My B.smithi though..that is a whole different ballgame.
@viper69
I also react strongly to fiberglass and that styff they use as house insulation. Those particals also penetrate the skin, creating similar symptoms.
 

EulersK

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Everyone is different. What does Poison Ivy have to do with tarantula setae, do they activate the same molecular pathways? The same with fiberglass??
Isn't the setae on tarantulas purely mechanical? So poison ivy is a bad example, but fiberglass isn't too far off (although I doubt it's wholly analogous).
 

Moonohol

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Isn't the setae on tarantulas purely mechanical? So poison ivy is a bad example, but fiberglass isn't too far off (although I doubt it's wholly analogous).
I'd be really interested to see urticating setae and fiberglass side by side under a microscope.
 

Bugmom

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I went years with zero reaction from urticating hairs. Now if I get any on me, from ANY species that has them, I get itchy. Not right away though - that's the weird part. It takes a couple of days, and then I'm itchy for up to a week and anti-itch creams are barely helpful. It's only on my fingers though! If I get haired on my forearms or the back of my hand, no reaction at all. o_O

Point is, these things are very person-specific. If you're concerned about hairs, invest in a box of latex or nitrile gloves, and wear those when you're dealing with a hair flicker. Don't be like me and buy the box then never wear the gloves lol
 

Chris LXXIX

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Let's not forget Megaphobema robustum hairs... a lot of keepers are very sensitive to those. Me, Christ :angelic: on the other hand are very pissed off when I don't end with those in the finger, or hand, when I'm particularly lucky :-s
 

viper69

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Merely the fact that I seem to develop serious negative reactions to irritants. I realize it's apples to oranges but none the less the outcome is the same. Sounds like I just better stay clear or the genus know to flick.
It is apples to oranges. They are not necessarily related. Would not use this as a barometer myself at all.

However to be safe one should only get species without the setae if you are that concerned.
 

viper69

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Isn't the setae on tarantulas purely mechanical? So poison ivy is a bad example, but fiberglass isn't too far off (although I doubt it's wholly analogous).

It may be only mechanical. I'm not familiar with all the T setae research, if I recall almost all of it is morphological in nature combined w/location on the T. With other animals ie. caterpillar, there is research demonstrating an immune response. I wouldn't rule it out for T setae myself, but I could be wrong.
 
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viper69

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Ladiodora hairs seem to produce a mild reaction on my skin. My B.smithi though..that is a whole different ballgame.
@viper69
I also react strongly to fiberglass and that styff they use as house insulation. Those particals also penetrate the skin, creating similar symptoms.
I've been exposed to the "same" stuff I wasn't affected like I am with Ts. Different for all as we know.
 

Andrea82

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I've been exposed to the "same" f I wasn't affected like I am with Ts. Different for all as we know.
Maybe it is the irritation caused by hairs or fiberglass. I remember playing in the yellow stuff when younger and coming home with bumps and itchiness everywhere. Maybe people who are sensitive to that stuff could be more sensitive to u-hairs? Just thinking out loud again ;)
 
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