Uropygi pix

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
let me show you some pix...

Uropygi sp. cf.Hypoctonus sp. ?!?


differnt species?!?



what do you say?, i must shoot some fotos of the ventral side, maybe they are just male and female... ;)
 

Jeremy Huff

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2003
Messages
125
Nice photos. The second one is a female. You can tell by the modification of the tarsomeres on leg 1. You can see that it looks damaged at first, but is actually a slight hook. This is a defining character for the genus Thelyphonus, Tetrabilus, Ginosigma and Abaliella. Yours are very likely a Thelyphonus sp., which is the most speciose genera. Hypoctonus doesn't have a keel running from the lateral eyes to the median eyes, which is very evident in your photos.

I can't see the tarsomeres in the first photo because they cropped out of the shot. The first one looks like a freshly moulted specimen and could very well be a male. If they are from the same area, they are almost certainly the same species.

Can I ask what dealer you got them from and what country they are from?

Jeremy
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
Nice photos. The second one is a female. You can tell by the modification of the tarsomeres on leg 1. You can see that it looks damaged at first, but is actually a slight hook. This is a defining character for the genus Thelyphonus, Tetrabilus, Ginosigma and Abaliella. Yours are very likely a Thelyphonus sp., which is the most speciose genera. Hypoctonus doesn't have a keel running from the lateral eyes to the median eyes, which is very evident in your photos.

I can't see the tarsomeres in the first photo because they cropped out of the shot. The first one looks like a freshly moulted specimen and could very well be a male. If they are from the same area, they are almost certainly the same species.

Can I ask what dealer you got them from and what country they are from?

Jeremy
Hello Jeremy!
thanks for your reply. i have 6 species of this,all from burma, if i am thinkg right, but i will ask the dealer once more.
i will also shoot next week pixs of each species dorsal and ventral, i hope then you can help me more in detail...

i found the "describtion of Thelyphonus". but as i can see oter pcs from hypot. they slight band from the eyes, exist on both... so some of this pcs may be false titeled...
i will post some more later.
 

Jeremy Huff

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2003
Messages
125
Hi Michael,

The defining charachter that splits the 2 families of thelyphonids is the keel between the eyes. Any photos of "Hypoctonus" that show this keel, are not Hypoctonus, they are a different family and genera, and are usually Thelyphonus. Hypoctonus generally have a more slender carapace as well. See Rowland and Cooke, 1973. This is the most recent key to the genera. It is in the Journal of Arachnology which you can download free from their website.

Jeremy
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
hello jermey!
here are 3 species from me, with dorsal and ventral shoot.
species 1



species2



species3



so what do you say?!?
THANKS
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
They are all from the same region in malaysia...

my opionen first and last one are female, and the second one a male.
 
Last edited:

Jeremy Huff

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2003
Messages
125
Hi Michael,

Thanks for the photos. As I said above, the one with the modification on the tarsomeres of leg 1 is a female. Specimen #2 has this modification. The first and third specimens are likely males, but I am not convinved they are mature. They could be penultimate. The red in the pedipalps are noticable in these two specimens and not in the female (which is mature) Usually adults lose this red colour in the pedipalps. All 3 are probably the same species, but without actual specimens in front of me, I can't be sure. So they are from Malaysia and not Burma?

Thanks
Jeremy
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
hi
thanks first!
yes they are from malaysia.
any gues what species it could be? and how big will they get? my biggest one is 6cm body... adult?!?
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
Hello Michael and Jeremy.

It is seems so all 3 are females but for last pic it is not seen well, so I'm not sure.
Jeremy, can it be some Typopeltis spp?
 

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
hello
they 3 pcs aren't defenitly not the same sex. see the ventral pix. 2 of them (first and third) have a half circle "segment" and the second one has a split "cirle"
do you see what i mean?
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
Clear shot of the undersite of the 3d specimens gives more info (to me) about it's sex.
 

Jeremy Huff

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2003
Messages
125
The 2nd one is definitely a female and mature and probably a Thelyphonus spp., not Typopeltis. Typopeltis females do not have the tarsomere modification. The other 2 look like they are penultimate specimens. They could be males. If they are females with no tarsomere modification, then they are not Thelyphonus. This modification is only evident when mature. I have not seen any records of two species, let alone different genera, living in the same region. So, if they were collected in the same area, it is likely they are the same species. I can't identify species without preserved specimens.

Jeremy
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
Hello Jeremy!

Hope You had a useful trip!

I'm either not see tarsomere in two others but I see anal sternit and its shape looks like belongs to female specimen, not the male elpecially if we talk about Telyphonus spp.
In the absolut mess with the material and identification of the species can somebody be sure that not any species occur simpathrically in Malaysia? But I also think these are the same one species, and not different, by looking the limited external morphology on th pic.
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
my species

Hello!

Michael, I'm sorry to hijack Your thread, but seems so we both and I believe many others need some taxo lesson from Jeremy since so he is the only one professinal researcher of this group so far available to the contact via WWW.
So, here's what is known as:

- Minbosius manilanus frpm Manila region

- sp. of unknown genus from Philippines (I believe also is from Manila region)

- "Hypoctonus rangunensis" as the name it sold in Europe

What can You tell of these, Jeremy, please?
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Banshee05

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2005
Messages
578
no problem, i also want to know and LEARN more. keep on discussing ;)

nice collections. are you able to breed all those?
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
Maybe only the "Hypoctonus" one since I and my friend have both sexes. All other are females.
 

Jeremy Huff

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2003
Messages
125
Mikhail,

The first two look like they are M. manilanus. I got a bunch of these last year and they keyed out to that. The second looks like a young juvenile. The 3rd specimen is NOT Hypoctonus. There is a clear ridge running from the lateral eyes to median eyes. Hypoctonus is smooth. Again, this is likely a Thelyphonus sp. if it is Burma/Thailand/Malaysia/Indonesian

Hope this helps...

Jeremy
 

M.F.Bagaturov

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2004
Messages
1,005
Hello Jeremy!

I think I knew where do You got a bunch of these phillippinese.
And this is what I'm aware of about the so-called "Hypoctonus."
Thank You very much!

I have another question About the natural habitat of uropygy. I knew and heard that some species can be found up the trees in nature?
Can You comment this?
 

Jeremy Huff

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2003
Messages
125
Hi Mikhail,

I got my Philippine specimens from Jeffebeck. They were from Negros island. Check your females of the "Hypoctonus" and look at the first leg of the females towards the ends where the tarsomeres are (8 small segments). If they are modified with what looks like a deformity, they are most likely a Thelyphonus species.

I have never collected any species on trees, in fact I have rarely found them under wood. They are usually under rocks. We also found specimens in small mammal holes living in groups. Peter Weygoldt has collected them on trees at night, but I doubt they live on the trees during the day. It is possible some species live under the bark of dead trees. Also, in the US, M.giganteus will come out when it is raining and climb off the ground.

Jeremy
 
Top