unorthodox drying method question??

godzilladoll

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 21, 2010
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17
I know I've been asking quite a bit of questions but after this I think I'll be okay for a while. I was told not to use the substrate I had for my G. Rosea so I got block of coco fiber. The only problem is that I live in Ohio and it's below freezing outside so waiting for it to dry out in the sun is not going to happen.


so my crazy question is... would it be a bad idea to use a hair dryer to dry the coco fiber??

I threw out the old sub and all I'm waiting on is this to dry so I can get her back where she belongs - I pretty much moved her in an ICU set up for the time being. I don't want to sit her in wet substrate so any thoughts on this would be great. I know it sounds crazy but it would work unless it does something weird to the coco fiber.
 

codykrr

Arachnoking
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Sep 22, 2008
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When I did use coco fiber, I would bake it at 300F in disposable pans. stirring it around every now and again.
 

rustym3talh3ad

Arachnoangel
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Sep 22, 2008
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885
I know I've been asking quite a bit of questions but after this I think I'll be okay for a while. I was told not to use the substrate I had for my G. Rosea so I got block of coco fiber. The only problem is that I live in Ohio and it's below freezing outside so waiting for it to dry out in the sun is not going to happen.


so my crazy question is... would it be a bad idea to use a hair dryer to dry the coco fiber??

I threw out the old sub and all I'm waiting on is this to dry so I can get her back where she belongs - I pretty much moved her in an ICU set up for the time being. I don't want to sit her in wet substrate so any thoughts on this would be great. I know it sounds crazy but it would work unless it does something weird to the coco fiber.
It wont hurt her to dry it out naturally. she will most likely stay off of the substrate for the few days it will take. if you really wanna dry it out put it out flat on a big cookie sheet and put it in the oven at like 210 degrees and let it sit there for about 45-hour...till it to see how much is left to be dried. if its still wet put it back in there. but once again a natural drying process is fine. i usually just grab a handful at a time and squeeze any access water from it before putting it into the cage. within a few days its completely dry.

---------- Post added at 07:39 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:38 PM ----------

When I did use coco fiber, I would bake it at 300F in disposable pans. stirring it around every now and again.
beat me to it lol. though i keep my oven a bit lower in temp. ;)
 

godzilladoll

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 21, 2010
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17
Oh that sounds like a much better plan but I don't know how my mom would feel about me baking substrate. she might not like that. :8o hmmm I might just go with the naturally drying method. But once I move out which will hopefully be soon I will remember to bake it!!

thanks guys!
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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Dec 11, 2008
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Oh that sounds like a much better plan but I don't know how my mom would feel about me baking substrate. she might not like that. :8o hmmm I might just go with the naturally drying method. But once I move out which will hopefully be soon I will remember to bake it!!

thanks guys!
It does make the whole house smell rather earthy, which can be in a bad way for some people. I would agree to let it dry out naturally as well, but your hairdryer might work to dry a spot of substrate on the top. That way the T has a dry patch to stand on, but if you have cork bark or a hide that it can stand on that will work fine and no need to bother with the hairdryer. When we are dealing with wet substrate and a T that dislikes it, we will sprinkle some dry on top of the wet and that works well for us.
 

rustym3talh3ad

Arachnoangel
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Sep 22, 2008
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Another thing to do is to make up your bedding in advance, and let it dry over a long period of time. i will buy 3 packs of the 3bricks which will be 9 total bricks of bedding. i put it all in a big rubbermaid tote and make it all up, then store it in a warm dry area without the lid on it, till it twice a week, and by the time the months up i have a giant tote full of dry bedding at my disposal. if i need to moisten it for a more humid character i put it in a small bucket, add desired amount of water and WAHLAH rehydrated bedding lol.

PS - Remember to till it though becuz if it stays wet for too long at the bottom of the tote it will start to get anaerobic bacteria in there from the stagnant moisture. its not really harmful but it does make your house smell like well....an outhouse lol.
 

godzilladoll

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 21, 2010
Messages
17
getting it in advance is a good idea I will have to get some rubber totes and do it that way. I think it already has kind of an earthy smell when it's wet which isn't too bad but I dunno about too much of that smell. I will dry the top the best I can before I put her back.

---------- Post added at 08:50 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:00 PM ----------

I had to laugh once she started walking on the substrate because she started lifting her front legs really high like "okay, this is not cool" she's up on the side of the glass now.
 

BQC123

Arachnobaron
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May 8, 2010
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You could try putting it in an old pillow case, tying it off good, and run it through the dryer. If the material is tight enough, you should not even get any dust in the machine.
 

CAK

Arachnoknight
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Nov 17, 2009
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if you bake it on a cookie sheet... remember to clean up your mess if it spills. The next time you end up with a good hankering for a Sausage and Pepperoni Pizza and you crank that sucker to 425 to bake it... Your house will smell like a forest fire and Smokey Bear will pay you a visit! :D


I used to bake mine at 210.
 

DansDragons

Arachnobaron
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Sep 18, 2008
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putting in the oven is a waste..5-10mins in a microwave and you'll have bone dry eco earth.
 

CAK

Arachnoknight
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Oh fooey! Danno... Why didn't I think of that! :wall:


Less mess and I bet it dries out much nicer too!





Thanks for the idea on the Microwave! :D
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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Beware though, the next few things you microwave have a slightly woody smell to them. I hope to never bake or microwave again to avoid the smell. Not that it is horrible, but I would rather go outside in the woods for that smell, not my kitchen. :D
 

DansDragons

Arachnobaron
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Sep 18, 2008
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Beware though, the next few things you microwave have a slightly woody smell to them. I hope to never bake or microwave again to avoid the smell. Not that it is horrible, but I would rather go outside in the woods for that smell, not my kitchen. :D
i have never cooked anything after drying sub that smelled or tasted like the sub itself..
 

KnightinGale

Arachnoknight
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Sep 16, 2009
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A thought for next time too: when I am reconstituting those bricks for something that needs dry substrate, I use much less water than recommended. It's a little more work, but it takes less time to get bone dry like I want it. I take a butterknife and use it to break the brick apart (it comes off in thin leaves if you use the knife on the side.) Then lay those all out on the bottom of your bucket and add your adjusted amount of water. After a bit I usually run my hand through and break apart any chunks that are still there so that they can all get a chance at the moisture and leave it a bit longer before spreading it out to dry. Done right, this leaves me with substrate that is already only heavily damp rather than sopping like it comes out if you follow the directions.
 

godzilladoll

Arachnopeon
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Dec 21, 2010
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That's the way I did it - only using a little bit of water. I didn't think about using a butter knife though. I just used my hands. It did help it to stay only damp and not soaking wet.
 

Abby

Arachnoknight
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Sep 9, 2009
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I totally agree with the less water approach.

The first time I used the coco fiber brick I used as much water as the instructions said.
I distributed it an aluminun pan and left it on the table to dry. It took three days for the substrate to finally be dry enough.

My cat found out the substrate was finally dry and acceptable, and used it as a litter box....great....had to throw the whole thing out. :mad:

So....beware of any kitties around finally dried substrate :D
 
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