Typical Listicle Clickbait

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,884
I wasn't sure which board would be best, as the article pertains to all of the types of animals we discuss on Arachnoboards.

The 10 Most Dangerous Bugs to Watch Out for This Summer: check out the accompanying pictures
  1. Black Widow Spider
  2. Tarantula Spider
  3. Africanized Bee
  4. Mosquitoes
  5. Red Fire Ants
  6. Wasps
  7. Brown Recluse Spider
  8. Scorpions
  9. Ticks
  10. Centipedes and Millipedes

I'm not sure why this article would designate tarantulas as dangerous, let alone in the "10 most dangerous bugs." No species of tarantula is deadly, but even the ones with the more potent venom are limited to the Old World (Africa, Asia, and Australia).

The genus of tarantula depicted in the photo, Brachypelma, has mild venom and is not even encountered in the United States except in the pet trade. (They are considered to be beginner-friendly species.)

The tarantulas found in the United States belong to the genus Aphonopelma. They have mild venom and a gentle disposition. Juveniles and females are rarely seen outside their burrows; it's the mature males wandering for mates that people normally encounter.

The photo accompanying the brown recluse (Loxosceles reclusa) is not even in the same family as the brown recluse, and the spider in the photo is not medically significant. The sources where this photo was originally found only identify it as a "brown spider." The bogus brown recluse ID seems to have been taken from a pest control blog.

Knowing the geographic area where a spider was found is critical in identifying it. However, the eye arrangement suggests that it belongs to the nursery web spider family (Pisauridae), and if it was found in the U.S. or southern Canada, it might be a young six-spotted fishing spider (Dolomedes triton).

I'd have to ask the scorpion and centipede keepers about those images, but I'm willing to bet that the photo does not show a U.S. species of scorpion. I'm wondering if it's one of the milder species common in the pet trade.
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
675
Yup.... looks like an asian forest scorpion. Would've made more sense if they used an Arizona Bark Scorpion, but they don't look as scary to paranoid soccer moms, which is who this article is probably directed to;)
 

TarantulaArvind

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 10, 2016
Messages
32
Yup.... looks like an asian forest scorpion. Would've made more sense if they used an Arizona Bark Scorpion, but they don't look as scary to paranoid soccer moms, which is who this article is probably directed to;)
The way they addressed it as just "tarantula" shows they know nothing about it (let alone the potency, ow/nw etc). I dunno which journal this appeared in, but imo it's jus to create sensationalism by someone unaware of these to an uneducated audience.

To expect something scientific /rational from these Ppl who wrote the article is jus a fool's errand...
 

CJW

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
26
I guarantee you that they open up google images, type "Tarantula" and pick the first picture they see. Also why do they put them in this list of "dangerous" bugs and then say they only cause rashes and pain at the biting point?
 

Devin B

Arachnobaron
Joined
Sep 30, 2016
Messages
326
Why is the "Tarantula spider" ranked higher thanthe killer bees. Also is there any species of millipede that poses any threat to humans at all?
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
Was anything more expected from a click bait article? I've never followed a link like that and got anything useful from it. Take care clicking them as links like that have tripped double click alerts at work from our anti-malware programs.

I'd be afraid of that link more than any of the things you all said was on that list. Ticks would be a close second though as I have 3 friends that suffer from lyme disease and that is no fun thing. The rest of those things I've been around, including the black widow, are not that big of a threat. Well, you might catch something from a mosquito like you could a tick though in the US that is a lot less likely.
 

Stugy

Arachnolord
Joined
Apr 21, 2016
Messages
648
Looking at the list hurt my eyes. Especially the scorpion... -TRIGGERED-
 
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