Two story enclosure

zukebub

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
5
I was in the market for a new tarantula and the shop employee convinced me to go with a L. parahybana for my 10 gallon terrarium. Its a medium sized T for the time being but I expect it will get bigger, it being a birdeater.
I had some success before with constructing a tarantula burrow from egg cartons that goes under the substrate and the T seems to like the one I made for it. Now I want to try and enlarge the tarantula burrow for when it gets larger. Does anyone have experience making an understory for their terrariums? Is it a good way to maximize space or should I just start looking for a larger terrarium?
 

Dovey

Arachnobaron
Joined
Apr 9, 2016
Messages
547
15 long would be perfect. How often do the adult LP's go to ground, anyway? That would be the deciding factor for me.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
You could probably create something from cork bark half tubes and cork flats using a glue gun but it may be a little pricey. I love the half tubes for creation of hides. They make it easy to expand the travel space for the T without taking up additional space on your shelf.

EDIT* If you take two half tubes and lay a large cork bark flat across the top of them. It will cover a fair amount of space. But you need to make sure the height of the half tubes (radius) is enough for the potential size of your T.
 
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Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
I'd take a 20 gallon glass terrarium and glue a piece of plexi halfway down into the enclosure. Make sure you cut out a piece of it though for the "burrow." I'd then make a hole going down into the ground out of florist's foam and place that through the space left in the plexi glass. Add substrate to both layers, and finish off the cage. I haven't tried this method before, but that's how I'd do it.
 

zukebub

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
5
I'd take a 20 gallon glass terrarium and glue a piece of plexi halfway down into the enclosure. Make sure you cut out a piece of it though for the "burrow." I'd then make a hole going down into the ground out of florist's foam and place that through the space left in the plexi glass. Add substrate to both layers, and finish off the cage. I haven't tried this method before, but that's how I'd do it.
I like your idea.
Would the plexiglass and foam be a permanent remodel of the terrarium? I'm always worried I won't like how these projects turn out and I can't restart.
 

zukebub

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 19, 2016
Messages
5
You could probably create something from cork bark half tubes and cork flats using a glue gun but it may be a little pricey. I love the half tubes for creation of hides. They make it easy to expand the travel space for the T without taking up additional space on your shelf.

EDIT* If you take two half tubes and lay a large cork bark flat across the top of them. It will cover a fair amount of space. But you need to make sure the height of the half tubes (radius) is enough for the potential size of your T.
That's a cool idea. You can get really creative if you want to make a spider tunnel system. Are egg cartons safe to use if I'm on a budget?
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
I like your idea.
Would the plexiglass and foam be a permanent remodel of the terrarium? I'm always worried I won't like how these projects turn out and I can't restart.
The foam could be easily removed, but I don't see how you could get the plexi out unless you found a way to dissolve the aquarium silicon. Maybe you could cut it free?
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
I like your idea.
Would the plexiglass and foam be a permanent remodel of the terrarium? I'm always worried I won't like how these projects turn out and I can't restart.
Does L. parahybana require any moisture in the substrate? I don't own one. If so, are you talking about the paper board egg crates or the ones that have that foam like fiber? Any moisture needs might rule out anything made of paper board (or my suggestion of cork bark).

You could make a portable platform out of acrylic or lexan with your own supports, but it would take a little work to insure it doesn't wobble when sitting on substrate. But this would still cost a little money. You might be able to buy some thing at the grocery store made of strong plastic or glass that could be used for vertical supports and then you would only need to buy a flat piece of plastic and aquarium glue in the needed size. Take a look at the grocery aisles for sauces etc that are in acceptable looking clear bottles. Glass bottles would be strong and probably glue to acrylic just fine. You could save the contents of the bottles for future kitchen use if you can find something you like.
 

ratluvr76

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
741
if the supporting structure was going to be hidden in substrate anyway, it may be more cost effective and durable if you used pvc pipes, maybe even cut in half.... just a thought.
 

Teal

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 11, 2009
Messages
4,112
I made a second story in a 10g for my juvie Theraposa years ago. I used the green craft styrofoam.. I made a round brace in the middle on the bottom, then cut a square piece to fit perfectly into the tank and glued it. Then I made a little ramp out of the same material. My Theraposa loved it!
 

sschind

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
344
The foam could be easily removed, but I don't see how you could get the plexi out unless you found a way to dissolve the aquarium silicon. Maybe you could cut it free?
I kind of have an idea what you are talking about but not 100% sure. I think you are basically trying to "force" the spider to burrow in a certain part of the cage by placing the plexi in such a way to prevent access. I'm not sure what the florist foam would be used for unless its to allow them to make a burrow in it that will not collapse. This may just work. My first attempt at trying something like this I actually placed a large block of florist foam at the back of the tank thinking the spider would burrow into the coco fiber near the front glass and within a few days she had a nice burrow dug into the foam and completely out of site.
 

sschind

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
344
if the supporting structure was going to be hidden in substrate anyway, it may be more cost effective and durable if you used pvc pipes, maybe even cut in half.... just a thought.
PVC pipes cut in half placed up against the front glass and then filled in with aquarium gravel will make a nice burrow. Cover the front of the glass with paper and they may not even web it up too much. I suggest a couple of things to make it look better. 1) hit the inside of the PVC with a blowtorch or a lighter to burn it a little or scorch it in places. It will darken it up inside and it will look better and it may make the tarantula a bit more comfortable. if you heat the PVC a little you can even put some little bends or indentations in it to make it look more natural. (do this outside as the fumes are pretty nasty) 2) smear aquarium silicone on the inside and cover with coco fiber to accomplish the same thing. It looks a little nicer but it takes longer than the torch or lighter.
 
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