T's and extreme heat

Derek W.

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
120
As we all know, it is summer, and in most places the temperature can start to really high. So I was wondering, what is the hottest temperature T's can safely handle?
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,671
As we all know, it is summer, and in most places the temperature can start to really high. So I was wondering, what is the hottest temperature T's can safely handle?
As long as you don't have them in direct sunlight and they all have small water dishes filled as high as they can go and a hide your T's will be just fine.
 

deadly_elegance

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 6, 2006
Messages
46
here in the philippines temperature range from 88-95 degrees fahrenheit the highest is 99f last april all of my inverts are just fine not to mention feeding and molting frenzy,
 

ahas

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 11, 2007
Messages
668
Sorry for the rookie question. I have spiderlings and I' m wondering how to give them a water dish when they' re in a small container.

Should I transfer them to a bigger enclosure? I heard that spiderlings don' t do well in big enclosures.


thanks,

Fred
 

sick4x4

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
1,776
Sorry for the rookie question. I have spiderlings and I' m wondering how to give them a water dish when they' re in a small container.

Should I transfer them to a bigger enclosure? I heard that spiderlings don' t do well in big enclosures.


thanks,

Fred
usually as a rule {D water dishes are reserved for t's about 2.5"-3"+ ,spider-lings you usually just mist....
 

jr47

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
597
Sorry for the rookie question. I have spiderlings and I' m wondering how to give them a water dish when they' re in a small container.

Should I transfer them to a bigger enclosure? I heard that spiderlings don' t do well in big enclosures.


thanks,

Fred
Mine are 1 - 1.5 " I use pop caps about half full for water dish. I also have a g. rosea sling in a ten gallon tank and its doing great. I just put all of mine in larger containers a few weeks ago.
I'm sure some sp. dont really need the extra room. But so far with mine it hasn't seemed to hurt them. They are eating well. Digging and webbing like they normally do
 

Derek W.

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 5, 2006
Messages
120
here in the philippines temperature range from 88-95 degrees fahrenheit the highest is 99f last april all of my inverts are just fine not to mention feeding and molting frenzy,
Good to know, cause today it is gonna be 97 where I'm at, so I was getting a little paranoid over the whole temp thing

Sorry for the rookie question. I have spiderlings and I' m wondering how to give them a water dish when they' re in a small container.

Should I transfer them to a bigger enclosure? I heard that spiderlings don' t do well in big enclosures.


thanks,

Fred
For future reference Fred, when you have a question like this that doesn't fit the topic of the thread, you either need to post it in a thread with the same topic or create a new thread.

But to answer your question anyways it all depends on the size of the spiderlings. I agree with sick4x4 that you should prolly wait until they are close to 3 inches before you give them a water dish. Just mist the sides of their container and they will drink from the water droplets, but don't drown them or mist to often, since tiny slings get most of their water from their food anyways. They should be in a small enclosure like a small deli cup or something comparable until they reach like 2 inches, at which point you can probably transfer them to something like the smallest kritter keeper. Hopefully that helps, but if you want more input you should make a new thread.

I would ask that anyone else who replies to this to keep it on the original topic of temperature, since I could still use some more input.
 

bonesmama

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
1,019
As I've said before, I always find something to give water to even my smallest slings,a toothpaste cap works great, anything that will hold water. I've seen them drink from them,too. I know most people don't agree with me, but all my slings have done really well so far and it gives me peace of mind!
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 28, 2007
Messages
1,671
As I've said before, I always find something to give water to even my smallest slings,a toothpaste cap works great, anything that will hold water. I've seen them drink from them,too. I know most people don't agree with me, but all my slings have done really well so far and it gives me peace of mind!
I also agree and regardless of the size of the sling I'll use any cap that will work regardless of the size of the cap because the spider isn't going to just jump in the water head first and Tarantulas are going at balancing them selves and climbing out of water dishes so the size of the dish doesn't really matter as long as there is water there. and if you do have a water dish you don't have to worry about if the T is thirsty cause he'll have water at his disposal.
 

cricket54

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 27, 2003
Messages
903
Hi bones and all, I moved from NJ to Morongo Valley, CA. Its very hot, part of the "High Desert" of the Mohave Desert. It will be 111 today and I'm near the mountains, so much higher in the valleys. Very very dry. I was conserned about the heat, but all my arachnids are thriving. I have them inside of course, out of the sunlight, and the house is cooled by a swamp cooler. Keep it on the warm side. No thermostat, so I don't know what temps are inside. I just find I have to give them all water more often. I am conserned for my H. longinmanus scorpion, on whether its damp enough for her. She is still in a critter keeper which seems to keep the moisture in better then an aquarium. Now my full sz adult female A. versicolor is the thristiest T it seems. She is in a big prezel jar so its more humid. Just wonder if anyone has kept their arachnids for a long time in such hot dry heat.

Sharon
 

sparular

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 20, 2007
Messages
184
Native regions

A lot of tarantulas come from very hot places like south India, tropical forests of South America, or equatorial Africa that get over 100 deg. Fahrenheit regularly. Cold is more of a problem for tropical Ts than heat. Desert Ts are probably more tolerant to cold as deserts can get quite cold at night. Even though the room temp may be 98 degrees, if you put a cage in sunlight, it becomes a solar oven and can easily cook a tarantula. Given water and shade, a T can survive hot temps better than a human, so if you can live in it, they will live in it.
 

bonesmama

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 28, 2004
Messages
1,019
Hey Cricket-- why in the world would you ever want to leave NJ!!??{D The heat shouldn't bother your T's as much as the aridity with some of them. The problem with avics is keeping the humidity up, while still having adequate ventilation, which is so important! And like you said, keeping the water bowls full is crucial too. Terrestrials can somewhat control the temps by burrowing. I would be interested to hear about the changes,if any in there behaviors.
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
5,450
I live in Maryland where it's in the 90's most of the summer and can surpass 100 on occasion. My spider room gets more sun exposure than any other and is thus the hottest room in the house. I keep the window shaded, humidifier running about 8 hours per day (40-50%) close the HVAC vent and keep the door open from a crack to maybe 1/3. The door opening is how i regulate temp in the room. On occasion i've miscalculated and come home to a 95deg room. The spiders seemed ok but were all extremely active. Climbing the walls, pacing etc. It seems if they were overheating they would have gone into their burrows or started digging one but that was not the case here. Btw, these are all NW terrestrials i'm talking about here.

My point is these guys have withstood temps approaching 100deg for hours at a time with apparently no ill effect.
 
Last edited:
Top