Trying to make a list...

Faunya

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Jan 2, 2003
Messages
217
My husband has agreed to let me have a few T's when I get up the nerve (and money) to order some, but there's got to be limits.

Call it over the top, but before making any order, I've been TRYING to put together a top 10 list based on caresheets, colors, what you guys have said, etc. (I've even been dreaming in latin!)

Obviously I'm not planning on getting all of these at once (maybe just one or two to start) since some of them require a bit more experience, but here's my top ten list so far:

1. Antilles Pinktoe (A. Versicolor)
2. Greenbottle blue (C. Cyanopubescens)
3. Mexican Pink (B. Klaasi) OR Mexican Fireleg (B. Boehmei)
4. Togo Starburst (H. Maculata)
5. Columbian Giant Redleg (M. Robustum)
6. Usambara Baboon (P. murinus)
7. Indian Violet (C. fimbriatus)
8. Indian Ornamental (P. Regalis)
9. Goliath Pinkfoot (T. Apophysis)
10. Bolivian Steely Blue (P. Antinous) OR Cobalt Blue (H. Lividium)

As you can see, I've tried to cover all the bases: arboreal, terrestrial, burrowing, webbing, aggressive, non-agressive, etc.

If any of you have a personal comment about feelings toward one of these species, I'd love to know. Also, I'd like to add something I would feel comfortable handling. I was thinking a Brazilian Black or a Pink Zebra Beauty...any other suggestions?

Thanks
-Faunya
 

Bjorgly

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
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Aug 7, 2002
Messages
729
In my opinion, you should get a brazilian black as your terrestrial/handlable spider, and The A.versicolor for your semi-handleable aboreal spider. Both spiders go against the norm of say a rosehair or a plain ol pink toe and are still good enough species for a beginner. The brazilian black is possibly the best beginner spider because aside from being hardy, there has yet to be a documented case of it biting anyone.

Great choices though, i like all the tarantulas on your list.

WARNING: you will become extremly addicted to tarantulas and if you just buy 2 the first time, you next order will probabaly have 10 it :D :D

Mark
 

phoenixxavierre

Arachnoprince
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Joined
Oct 9, 2002
Messages
1,293
Originally posted by Faunya

1. Antilles Pinktoe (A. Versicolor)
2. Greenbottle blue (C. Cyanopubescens)
3. Mexican Pink (B. Klaasi) OR Mexican Fireleg (B. Boehmei)
4. Togo Starburst (H. Maculata)
5. Columbian Giant Redleg (M. Robustum)
6. Usambara Baboon (P. murinus)
7. Indian Violet (C. fimbriatus)
8. Indian Ornamental (P. Regalis)
9. Goliath Pinkfoot (T. Apophysis)
10. Bolivian Steely Blue (P. Antinous) OR Cobalt Blue (H. Lividium)


If any of you have a personal comment about feelings toward one of these species, I'd love to know. Also, I'd like to add something I would feel comfortable handling. I was thinking a Brazilian Black or a Pink Zebra Beauty...any other suggestions?

Thanks
-Faunya
Hi Faunya,

Avicularia versicolor are a beautiful and interesting species.
C. cyaneopubescens are one of my favorites, skittish yet not prone to bite IME, and a beautiful blue.
B. boehmei are beautiful though skittish, but very friendly if you get to handling them often enough, though some people (like my wife) break out if this species so much as walks on them.
H. maculata are highstrung and defensive but beautiful.
M. robustum are interesting, and show themselves about a quarter to half the time. They do enjoy lurking in their burrows. They have a funny way of pushing undesirables away with their back legs rather than their front
Pterinochilus murinus are rather defensive but have many interesting variations and are very webby.
H. lividum are quite defensive and rarely seen outside the burrow, but have a metallic blue color that is amazing.
You've listed quite a few of my personal favorites, other than the cobalt blue, which I quit keeping since I rarely them, and prefer C. cyaneopubescens since it is more often seen and also is a nice blue.
Can't really compare those two, as they are worlds apart literally, and I think H. lividum is an incredible species, but I prefer if something is strikingly beautiful that it be seen more often, and as much as I would love it, I simply don't have room for all the species I would like to keep!

As far as handling, the Brachypelmas, Avicularias, Aphonopelmas, Grammostolas, are all good but then even the most "docile" tarantula is capable of biting if it feels threatened (even if it isn't really under threat).

Good luck on your future purchases,

Paul
 

Faunya

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
217
Well, not to worry...although I haven't personally kept T's, I have had some experience with them, including getting bitten by a very flighty, leggy little black tarantula that ran up my arm and got stuck in my hair when I was fishing it out of its tank for a customer in mom's pet store. I'm not really all that skittish, myself, although my hands are very ticklish, so I have to be careful when they walk on me.

I don't plan on handling any of my T's except for the one I buy specifically for that purpose. The rest I hope to keep like my aquariums: beautiful to look at, but not to be stirred up unless absolutely necessary.

As for the addiction, it's already set in. My husband caught a wild tarantula this summer while interning in the San Fransisco area. It was a very docile, easy going spider that provided plenty of entertainment. Unfortunately, I didn't get a chance to see it before his roomate decided to bake it in the sun:mad: Since then, I've been scouring the web for any and all information, starting with trying to figure out what kind of spider my husband found...

Faunya
 

Bjorgly

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
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Aug 7, 2002
Messages
729
If you want a tarantula specifically for handling, there is no better spider than the Brazilian Black (Grammostola pulchra)

Mark
 

Faunya

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
217
One more thing...

Should I be worried about purchasing any of these as s'lings? I've heard that some species are down-right touchy as juvies, but perfectly hardy as adults (Versicolor in particular). Any thoughts?

thanks,
-Faunya
 

dilleo

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 26, 2002
Messages
111
I'd get the versicolor and the fimbriatus.

-Jeremy
 

Kaissos5

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 29, 2002
Messages
51
I might be obsesed, because even though i haven't got one yet i am planning to purchase a L. Parahybana. (Brazilion salmon pink birdeater) I am in love and i think you might want to check it out (even make it #11)
 

Faunya

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
217
"I might be obsesed, because even though i haven't got one yet i am planning to purchase a L. Parahybana. (Brazilion salmon pink birdeater) I am in love and i think you might want to check it out (even make it #11)"
-----------------------------------

I was looking into getting one of those instead of the Goliath Pinkfoot. From what I understand, they get nice and big as well...am I right?
 

Immortal_sin

Arachnotemptress
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 17, 2002
Messages
3,955
Originally posted by Faunya
My husband has agreed to let me have a few T's when I get up the nerve (and money) to order some, but there's got to be limits.

Call it over the top, but before making any order, I've been TRYING to put together a top 10 list based on caresheets, colors, what you guys have said, etc. (I've even been dreaming in latin!)

Obviously I'm not planning on getting all of these at once (maybe just one or two to start) since some of them require a bit more experience, but here's my top ten list so far:

1. Antilles Pinktoe (A. Versicolor)

I have a few of these, I HIGHLY recommend them! A bit jumpy, but docile, and absolutely gorgeous!


2. Greenbottle blue (C. Cyanopubescens)

I have 2 females. Great eaters, a bit flighty, but not overly, and still handlable

3. Mexican Pink (B. Klaasi) OR Mexican Fireleg (B. Boehmei)

I don't have either, but both are gorgeous. I have B smithi, and B emilia, the hairs KILL me though.

4. Togo Starburst (H. Maculata)

Have one, very beautiful, and mine is SHY. Others have said they are quite defensive, but I have not experienced that. I can reach in her container and grab the water bowl.

5. Columbian Giant Redleg (M. Robustum)

I have one of these also. Stay hidden mostly. Loves to turn her back on me and raise up on tiptoes as a defense. GREAT eater.
beautiful colors!

6. Usambara Baboon (P. murinus)

have a few HUNDRED of these LOL
Orange bitey things, if you have enough, you can take over the world!

7. Indian Violet (C. fimbriatus)

Heard good things ,but don't have one

8. Indian Ornamental (P. Regalis)

I have P regalis, in fact, one of them is loose in my house. I have a contained one also ;)
Neat spider, I love the pokies!

9. Goliath Pinkfoot (T. Apophysis)

don't have, heard the hairs are a killer, and the price is on the high side. Require more moisture than I'm comfortable with. Or maybe that's just my perception

10. Bolivian Steely Blue (P. Antinous) OR Cobalt Blue (H. Lividium)

no P antinous, but do have 2 H lividum. beautiful, but RARELY seen. Love to burrow. Again, with a deep burrow, they will run and hide, instead of fighting, at least mine will. Cage maintenence a snap, since they are always in their burrows.

As you can see, I've tried to cover all the bases: arboreal, terrestrial, burrowing, webbing, aggressive, non-agressive, etc.

If any of you have a personal comment about feelings toward one of these species, I'd love to know. Also, I'd like to add something I would feel comfortable handling. I was thinking a Brazilian Black or a Pink Zebra Beauty...any other suggestions?

I also have G pulchra (very calm, but a bit flicky. and E campestatus. Again, very calm, and good eaters, and handlable with all the usual disclaimers!

Thanks
-Faunya
 

Arachniphile

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
105
How many do you intend to start with? After looking at it, I would buy your list in 3rds starting at the top since that is just about the order of difficulty... Give or take...
 

Steve Nunn

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 30, 2002
Messages
1,777
Originally posted by Faunya
If any of you have a personal comment about feelings toward one of these species, I'd love to know. ?

Thanks
-Faunya
Hi,
P. antinous and T. apophysis would have to be two of the most spectacular theraphosids in the trade. They may be a little more temperamental then some other T's, but they are just so, SO spectacular.

Good luck making a decision;)

Steve
 

Faunya

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
217
Thanks for all the help, guys/gals...I've still got some thinking to do, cuz as you probably know, a favorite spiders list can never be finalized! :)

When I do order, I'm going to try to get larger juvies (1"+ if possible) since I've never raised a spider from a s'ling.

Thanks again.
 

Faunya

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
217
Originally posted by Arachniphile
How many do you intend to start with? After looking at it, I would buy your list in 3rds starting at the top since that is just about the order of difficulty... Give or take...

Probably just one or two to start with. I tried to put my list in the order I would like to purchase them in (i.e. Pokies, orange bitey things, and REALLY BIG buggers are towards the bottom).

I think I'm going to try to purchase a local spider first and keep it awhile before I make an order. There's a Petco in town that has an A. seemanni (poor thing) that's always hanging from the top of its cage, about 12" above its bark substrate. I've been pretty tempted to rescue it.
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Messages
1,709
For a handling spider, G. pulchra ( Brazilian black ) is awesome. It gets large ( to 7 inches I've heard) , looks cool, and is totally calm. I'd also reccomend the pink zebra ( E. campestratus ). I have this species, and I can tell you that mine is extremely tolerant of handling. She gets startled sometimes when I open the lid tank, but when I handle her she is typically very very calm. Another good thing about pzb's , as they are called, is that they don't use their hairs often. I've had my adult female for 14 months, and she has NEVER ONCE even attempted to flick at me, or bite. Brazilian blacks require more moisture than pink zebras, but still are pretty easy to care for. The pink zebra is super simple to care for, and likes it's habitat pretty dry. So in short, they are both very good handlers, about the same size, have similar lifespans ( about 17 - 20+ YEARS ) , both fairly easy to care for, and super, super docile. The only thing is that brazilian blacks are a lot more expensive, and not as easy to find. But, aside from the things I've mentioned, it's simply a matter of preference.
 
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