Traumatizing hairing

8leggednights

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 7, 2021
Messages
6
I’m a year T keeper. Usually don’t handle them, tried getting into that & Jack the Curly Haired Honduran is safe. This was in June- I had a terrible reaction with hives needing steroids. Prior to that I had only used a catch cup & paint brush to move him as needed. I will admit that the hairing was TOTALLY MY FOOLISHNESS & I wasn’t reading him & I should have backed off, but water under that bridge. My concern is that he molted safely about a week later & has refused water & stays in his cave since then. Webbed himself in locked the door like a teen. I apologize prolifically. I’m sure stress will be the answer & he’s getting close to adulthood so not growing as quickly so can fast a while. I’m not going to try handling him again. I don’t want to stress or hurt either of us. I just want him safe & healthy. Thanks for the input.
 

Arachnolove420

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 8, 2022
Messages
40
I’m a year T keeper. Usually don’t handle them, tried getting into that & Jack the Curly Haired Honduran is safe. This was in June- I had a terrible reaction with hives needing steroids. Prior to that I had only used a catch cup & paint brush to move him as needed. I will admit that the hairing was TOTALLY MY FOOLISHNESS & I wasn’t reading him & I should have backed off, but water under that bridge. My concern is that he molted safely about a week later & has refused water & stays in his cave since then. Webbed himself in locked the door like a teen. I apologize prolifically. I’m sure stress will be the answer & he’s getting close to adulthood so not growing as quickly so can fast a while. I’m not going to try handling him again. I don’t want to stress or hurt either of us. I just want him safe & healthy. Thanks for the input.
Ok... what do you mean "I wasn't reading him & should've backed off"? There is no way to know what a tarantula is "thinking" or will do. I'd advise against trying to handle them as it opens the door up to risk of injury for both you and the Tarantula.

Also, what do you mean that your T is refusing water?

It's not abnormal for them to hide after a molt. Their exoskeleton is still soft, making them vulnerable, therefore their instinct is to hide until they harden. A week seems like a long time, but depending on the species and size, it could take days to weeks or even months for the new exoskeleton to harden. And if indeed close to adulthood, a couple weeks time is normal before resuming completely normal behavior.


I'd also add that you should use the binomial name of the T you're referencing; in this case I believe a Tliltocatl albopilosus.
 

8leggednights

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 7, 2021
Messages
6
I wasn’t reading him- meant- I wasn’t thinking squirming legs= Kicking hairs. He seemed very uncomfortable being held.
 

Arachnolove420

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 8, 2022
Messages
40
I wasn’t reading him- meant- I wasn’t thinking squirming legs= Kicking hairs. He seemed very uncomfortable being held.
Yes, Tarantulas lack the senses required to be fully aware of a human and what it is. As far as the T is concerned, you're a large animal, possibly a predator. The docile Ts that some like handle are just the species that don't tend to have an immediate reaction to this potential preditor (humans) in a negative way (i.e. they just sit there or even crawl around). But the fact is, the T still has an instinctual "idea" you may be a preditor. That's what stops me from handling mine. I get so tempted, but since it can lead to injury for either of us and doesn't help them bond with you, then better to just avoid it.


Not funny, but it is funny (was not thinking the "reading behavior" was seeing it kick hairs). Yeah, squirming legs is a "sign" of hair kicking and sucks that you missed it and had such a bad reaction.
 
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8leggednights

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 7, 2021
Messages
6
Hard lessons not soon forgotten. But he’s fine. Eventually he’ll get hungry enough & venture back out.
no therapy- he’s not that complicated- he “ let it go” along with his last 3 setae (because I took the rest obviously) in the molt right?

Not funny, but it is funny (was not thinking the "reading behavior" was seeing it kick hairs). Yeah, squirming legs is a "sign" of hair kicking and sucks that you missed it and had such a bad reaction.
I laughed & cried a bit over it, but can’t be upset with him. Totally my fault. Learned lol. Still have the scars embedded- hundreds of hairs
 

Arachnolove420

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 8, 2022
Messages
40
Hard lessons not soon forgotten. But he’s fine. Eventually he’ll get hungry enough & venture back out.
no therapy- he’s not that complicated- he “ let it go” along with his last 3 setae (because I took the rest obviously) in the molt right?
You got it!

They do regain the urticating setae after they molt. 😉
 

Arachnophobphile

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Dec 24, 2018
Messages
493
I’m a year T keeper. Usually don’t handle them, tried getting into that & Jack the Curly Haired Honduran is safe. This was in June- I had a terrible reaction with hives needing steroids. Prior to that I had only used a catch cup & paint brush to move him as needed. I will admit that the hairing was TOTALLY MY FOOLISHNESS & I wasn’t reading him & I should have backed off, but water under that bridge. My concern is that he molted safely about a week later & has refused water & stays in his cave since then. Webbed himself in locked the door like a teen. I apologize prolifically. I’m sure stress will be the answer & he’s getting close to adulthood so not growing as quickly so can fast a while. I’m not going to try handling him again. I don’t want to stress or hurt either of us. I just want him safe & healthy. Thanks for the input.
I'm not going to bash you especially since you owned up to it and admitted it out here.

Besides that welcome to AB

Use the search feature at the top (magnifying glass).

Search on UrS, (urticating setae). Also search on handling.

Handling has many negative issues on it. Make sure you understand what those negatives are after researching. No handling = safe and alive tarantula.
 

Smotzer

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
4,263
Good for admitting the error in your ways and being open about it, this is a good thread to read for new people who are considering handling both on the part of the keeper and of the tarantula! It’s not so enjoyable or worth it for either party when things go wrong as they eventually will!!
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
16,174
I wasn’t reading him- meant- I wasn’t thinking squirming legs= Kicking hairs. He seemed very uncomfortable being held.
Really? You don’t say, that’s an amazing observation on an animal that is virtually blind.
Give it another go, see what happens :rolleyes:
 
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