Toxicity

Tiki108

Arachnopeon
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Sep 5, 2016
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I've recently convinced my husband to let me get more tarantulas. His big concern is the toxicity of certain species towards the cat and dog (I've found some research on the toxicity towards humans, but I'm having trouble finding it towards smaller mammals). Unfortunately I had a p. metallica sling escape on me and so before he agrees to more species, he wants to be sure what could actually be dangerous if it were to escape. This is the only escape I have had and it was from a stupid mistake which I don't plan to make again, but he just wants to be safe.

Here's the species I'm considering:
Avicularia diversipes
Avicularia versicolor
Brachypelma boehmei
Chilobrachys sp. black satan
Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens
Ephebopus murinus
Euathlus truculentus
Grammostola pulchra
Hapalopus sp. Colombia
Haplopelma lividum
Harpactira pulchripes
Heteroscodra maculata
Idiothele Mira
Lampropelma violaceopes
Oligoxystre diamantinensis
Pamphobeteus sp. esmeraldas
Poecilotheria regalis
Poecilotheria striata
Pterinochilus lugardi
Pterinochilus murinus
Pterinopelma Sazimai
Stasimopus sp.
 

sdsnybny

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All the OW T's have medically significant venom, some of the NW's might hurt or kill a small pet. Then there is allergic reactions to consider, although I read in a thread on here that T's don't have the required peptides in their venom to cause an allergic reaction but cant confirm this..
 

cold blood

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Yeah, it really is just as easy as focusing your collection to new world ts and avoiding the old worlds.
 

magicmed

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Agreed, stick to new world species like Brachypelma, Aphonopelma, Grammostola, Avicularia, Psalmopoeus and you'll be happy.

Definitely stay away from the poecs, they're very fast and pack a venomous punch.
 

Tiki108

Arachnopeon
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Sep 5, 2016
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Awesome, didn't realize it was that simple. Thank you everyone!
 

Matabuey

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It's really not that hard to make a room escape proof, if you want to keep OW's.

Providing your room is clutter free.

My cat is the most precious thing to me in the world, but still have loads of animals that could kill her haha.

But I know even if a T or one of my snakes did escape, there is 0% chance it's getting out of the room they are in.

You can buy breeze blockers for the door, so there is no gap for the T to run under. Use that in the room you're keeping them in (if you have a large enough gap for slings or even adults to pass under), when you're doing maintenance or feeding.

So if it does happen to run into the open room, it doesn't have a way to get out. (Providing you've made sure there are no other holes in walls, etc).

Depends how badly you want to keep old worlds. I already had a completely secure room due to the other animals I keep.
 

Tiki108

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Sep 5, 2016
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That's actually the plan, but at our current house it wouldn't be an option. We are planning to buy a house next year and I'm going to be working on my venomous license once the new regulations go through, so I'll have plenty that could harm the mammals lol. One of the many requirements is going to be a room to keep the Ts and reptiles in to keep everyone else safe and sound. :)
 

Matabuey

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That's actually the plan, but at our current house it wouldn't be an option. We are planning to buy a house next year and I'm going to be working on my venomous license once the new regulations go through, so I'll have plenty that could harm the mammals lol. One of the many requirements is going to be a room to keep the Ts and reptiles in to keep everyone else safe and sound. :)
Sweet!

Good luck :)
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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although I read in a thread on here that T's don't have the required peptides in their venom to cause an allergic reaction
I read the same thing. I don't believe it at all, particularly because you only need 3 amino acids for an antibody to bind to a peptide sequence.

Nature has a funny way of proving man's theories wrong time and time again.
 

Matabuey

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All the OW T's have medically significant venom, some of the NW's might hurt or kill a small pet. Then there is allergic reactions to consider, although I read in a thread on here that T's don't have the required peptides in their venom to cause an allergic reaction but cant confirm this..
They do have long enough protein chains, but not as many as those found in true spider venom or venomous snakes.

It's much less likely (unlikely), but still possible.

People get bitten by tarantulas often enough in captivity, and yet - no one has suffered an allergic reaction.

Compared with several cases of anaphylaxis from venomous snakes or true spiders such as Latrodectus.

Dr Bryan Fry had a post about it with a few toxicologists commenting on it too, on his forums. But unfortunately he's removed those forums from his site for the time being. You can message him on Facebook, although beware he does get a lot of messages so doesn't always reply with a full explanation lol.

A friend of mine actually holds a PhD in toxicology, so if you'd really like, I could get him to provide a better answer.
 

Chris LXXIX

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A friend of mine actually holds a PhD in toxicology, so if you'd really like, I could get him to provide a better answer.
One day you, a friend of yours, or one of your acquaintance will receive a Nobel Prize. Mark my words brudda :-s
 

Tiki108

Arachnopeon
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Sep 5, 2016
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Will do. His area of speciality is Centipede venom, but I'm sure he'll know more than any of us on this particular topic.

Will send you a PM once he's got back to me. :)
I'd be super interested in what he has to say as well!
 

cold blood

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Will do. His area of speciality is Centipede venom, but I'm sure he'll know more than any of us on this particular topic.

Will send you a PM once he's got back to me. :)
post publicly, its info many of us would like to read.
 

cold blood

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They do have long enough protein chains, but not as many as those found in true spider venom or venomous snakes.

It's much less likely (unlikely), but still possible.
Now its killing me because I cannot recall where I read it, but I do recall that it wasn't necessarily the number of peptides/protein chains, but rather their arrangement...if that makes any sense...I'm no expert on the subject of venoms.

I agree with your assessment though regardless of the scientific reasoning.:)
 
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