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Top five deadliest scorpions?

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Jeremy7, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
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    Well I see what you ment when you started mentioning the other Tityus spp. in the hobby lol. Pretty all the one's you mentioned are either highly venomous or are thought be of medical significance. I think thing that makes T.stigmurus and T. serrulatus so dangerous is the fact they can multiply very fast and unfortunately their venom's are very very slimier and unfortunately both have extremely toxic venom. The killing power of that venom kill's a roach pretty much instantly no struggle at all from the prey just ceases to live. People can complain that its inhuman to feed live to anything but the Tityus spp. have the lethal injection down :)
     
  2. Yep, it makes you respect the species! What do you mean by 'slimier' venom? As you said, it is too bad that the more "venomous" species are usually the most beautiful ones, I think T. trivittatus and T. confluens are some of the nicer specices, but they are so venomous!
     
  3. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    That species ive never heard of T. trivittatus or T. confluens yeah ive noticed the hotter it is the more beautiful it is. I just read that T.confluens was responsible for the death's of 4 children :( Its still a species I would like though despite its extremely venomous nature but the fact its caused fatalities is sad :( here something on its toxicity http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18983868 I ment their toxins are very much the same between T.stigmurus and T. serrulatus both can be fatal both have extremely toxic venom.
     
  4. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Back to the MMO, Means, Method and Opportunity. The term 'Deadliest' needs to be defined accurately: the animal's natural prey, the LD50, or humans. As for the Russells viper, one was coiled near our door in the dark and tagged my other's pants leg without any provocation other than proximity. But then the average rattlesnake would have acted the same way. The Russells is among the top 4 people killers because of it's proximity to humans. Drop a normal rattlesnake 'nest' as found in the Southwest in northern India and people would be dropping like flies.
    With the scorpion, the main reason people get tagged is their penchant for hiding in things that people handle. A pile of bricks that have a hole down the center next door to us turned up 7 scorpions. So we are basically talking about scorpion population density in human populated areas combined with how dangerous their toxin is, yes?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  5. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    Yeah that's a good point I gotta say Russells viper does sound like one nasty customer from what you have just said. So more or less your saying is that the highly venomous scorpions hide in places people stick their hands or objects they pick up. Again your right about the populations in mingling the highly venomous scorpions and the high population isn't a good mix. So what species gives you the most trouble there?? I know krait's are the silent killers of that region as are monocled cobra's and the very well known Russells viper which from what you said would bite someone just for existing in the same area.
     
  6. I've got that article already, beat you to it.:D I would also check out the journal Toxicon. I've got 'General biochemical and immunological characterization of the venom from the scorpion Tityus trivittatus of Argentina' from that journal. Hell of a title! It's almost as if they were trying to make it as long as possible. I would also check out the Journal of Arachnology, there is a paper on parthenogenesis in T. trivittatus. Might I ask, what species have you never heard of?

    @the snark, I agree. I was thinking a similar thing, that 'deadliest' has to be well-defined.
     
  7. PatrickM

    PatrickM Arachnopeon

  8. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    You did beat me to it lol yeah they seem to make it needlessly complicated for no reason at all. I think im finding most highly venomous Tityus spp. to be rather highly venomous and some have venom that is more then a 5/5 rating.
     
  9. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    With scorps very common around here, we follow the rule of not grabbing anything or putting your hand anywhere without being able to give it a full visual inspection. Finding a Chinese water scorp perched on the door knob one morning cemented this rule in stone.
    Our problematic local critters are the big 4 snakes, -O. Hannah, Kaouthai, Russells and Krait-, the giant red centipede (pretty common), Siamensis, the big black Het and the aforementioned water scorp. There is also a giant caterpillar and the blue caterpillar that can lay the average person to whale poop. Probably, the most hazardous encounters wise, are the scorps as they can be encountered at any time and when disturbed are always ready to go to guns, and the caterpillars which require only the slightest physical contact the envenomate.

    Kraits: Mostly a problem in the late evenings, Very laconic during the day. Russells: pretty much identical to rattlesnakes attitude and strike ability wise, Kaouthai and Hannah want nothing to do with people and will almost always zoom off. Siamensis tends to coil and get pissed off rather than zoom so it offers a unique hazard.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  10. voldemort

    voldemort Arachnoknight Old Timer

    can you post some pics?
     
  11. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    This was the one on the doorknob
    [​IMG]

    Important safety tip: Always turn on lights when going downstairs at night. (It was right at the bottom of the stairs)
    [​IMG]
     
  12. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    Kraits but which species given where you live i imagine the highly venomous many-banded krait and the common krait cause a lot of the fatalities plus their bite is pretty much painless as their venom is neurotoxin. Yes a Russlls viper would be our equivalent to say a eastern diamondback rattlesnake or maybe canebrake in some area's I imagine the issue with them isn't just the size but the fact they have rather complex venom's that very from region to region. Making anti-venom rather ineffective on some bites from other regions and such a big issue.

    ---------- Post added 02-27-2012 at 11:53 PM ----------

    That scorp almost looks like some kind of Tityus spp. but im guessing its a Hottentotta spp.
     
  13. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

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    Around here we gots the Black and White and Black and Yellow banded kraits. Not sure if either is the 'many banded'. I've been given the impression they are max dangerous due to combined circumstances: 1, in the evenings they are attracted to activity where they do the ambush thing. Their main victims being other snakes out on the prowl and drunk revelers around campfires. 2. They bite and hang on pretty tenaciously, pumping in the venom. The krait modus operendi being one bite of another snake and hang on until it quits wriggling then find the head or tip of the tail and swallow. And 3, way up there LD50 in the toxicity.
    As I understand it, the Russells venom changes dependent upon local temperature. In the warmer areas it is primarily a neurotoxin while in the colder areas. the Tibetan foothills and up in China it has additional ?hematotoxin? to aid in digestion.
    The opposite end of the attack spectrum is the big black het. scorps around here. I've watched them grab a small mouse, and a couple of geckos and sting well over a hundred times. They rewrite the book on belligerent whamming.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
  14. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    Oh I think you have the many-banded krait then they have many bands of black and white and black in color and have extremely toxic but slow acting venom. It sounds like your scorps do over kill lol mine only needs to sting its prey once but i guess they make sure to kill it. It sounds like you also have just the banded krait which is rather large with yellow and black bands while not near as toxic as the many-banded krait it could still kill someone.
     
  15. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    (Major apologies for hijacking this thread for a moment!!)
    The following link is a picture perfect example of krait ID confusion. The pictured snake, bungarus multi multi, many banded, has the white bands connecting on the belly in places like the Lao Wolf snake. It also goes from yellow bands to white bands. All that noise aside, the spinal ridge scale as can be seen in the pic is the give away: this is the 'many banded' model. This is NOT the common configuration of the northern Thailand version where the black and light bands are nearly always the same size and quite a bit broader.
    http://www.snakesoftaiwan.com/Bungarus multicinctus/species_bungarus_multicinctus.htm
    The following link is the typical Thai krait, Bungarus Fasciatus (Banded Krait)
    http://www.thailandsnakes.com/tag/banded-krait/
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
  16. voldemort

    voldemort Arachnoknight Old Timer

    looks like a Lychas mucronatus, might be wrong though. If you wanted to get rid of them I can PM you my address:)

    mike
     
  17. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    Well they are known for strong venom although I don't know much about these guys really at all. So what is your most dangerous scorp venom wise??
     
  18. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    Is Lychas Mucronatus aka Chinese Swimming Scorp. I get rid of them escorting them out of the house with a broom. (What is with a swimming scorp that climbs trees?)
     
  19. BigJ999

    BigJ999 Arachnoknight

    MS
    I think that species is of medical significance but you may have other scorps that i don't know about there. So the Russles viper sounds like a rather foul snake to be sure you have saw-scaled vipers as well??
     
  20. In Thailand? Think about this! Tityus spp. inhabit South America, and Hottentotta inhabit Africa and the Middle East!

    The scorpion does appear to be L. mucronatus. The "swimming scorpion" is just a common name, and is really a misnomer. This species is mainly tree-dwelling.:)

    Lychas mucronatus is not considered medically significant.;) The Scorpion Fauna probably has all the species found in Thailand. Lychas mucronatus is probably the most "venomous" in this area, but does not really have severe systematic effects, not at all.

    About the snakes, this is a very interesting discussion. At The Snark, have you ever had a bad encounter with one of your highly venomous snakes, besides the Russel's viper that you mentioned?
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
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