Too rare to handle?

Le Wasp

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 25, 2007
Messages
245
For some time, I've been trying to collect some of the more rare tarantula species. I finally managed to get a B. klaasi, one of the Ts on the top of my wish list. But... I find that it's so rare and valuable that I'm afraid to hold it. Does anyone else experience this?

I'm beginning to rethink my collection a bit. I'm much more likely to hold my G. rosea than my B. klaasi. Maybe I should focus on the species that I can appreciate and enjoy?
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
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Nov 8, 2007
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?

I'm beginning to rethink my collection a bit. I'm much more likely to hold my G. rosea than my B. klaasi. Maybe I should focus on the species that I can appreciate and enjoy?
I can appreciate and enjoy my collection and I never handle them. (special circumstances)
I wish everybody would be that way.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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590
I dont think it should make a difference. If i wanted to hold any of my terrestrials i would take the same precautions reguardless of price or availability.
 

Ictinike

Arachnobaron
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I dont think it should make a difference. If i wanted to hold any of my terrestrials i would take the same precautions reguardless of price or availability.
Spot on!

Not that OP was thinking value as in lesser costing T's are worth less and if killed due to handling or mishaps it would be "no big deal" but honestly regardless of cost, as pets, they should all be treated with the same respect and preparedness.
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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I can appreciate and enjoy my collection and I never handle them. (special circumstances)
I wish everybody would be that way.
I'm on this side of the fence.
 

captmarga

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
340
I only handle my Ts if they don't seem to object to it. If they kick hairs, or are pet holes - obviously not. My first T, Fang (A. hentzi or anax) actually strolled over to sit in my hand, never flicked hairs, and was very docile. I have yet to fine another that is quite like she was. I had her for several years.

Scrunchie, my seemani, is sitting in a little open acrylic box on my desk right now. A little gentle persuading to get her in the box, and then she just sits there. No kicking, no nothing. She doesn't act any different being handled than she does in her cage.

Mae West - um, nope, Not going to handle that one, or the H lividum that tried to eat the paintbrush rehoming him the first day. Slings, nope.

Would I play with a $600 spider - doubtful, afraid something would happen to it. But if a T is calm and doesn't mind, and *isn't breeding stock*, I will gently handle mine.

I know most people don't endorse handling their Ts. I don't endorse anyone who isn't knowledgeable about horses, donkeys, mules or zebras handling an intact stallion. There are two sides and a neutral position to every argument, and always will be.

It's your T... if you want to risk injury to you or it... regardless of species or price, then I guess it's your right to do so. Just remember how it might feel to them... and if you'd like it done to you!

Marga
 

TomM

Arachnobaron of Pennsylvania
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Oct 15, 2009
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448
I can appreciate and enjoy my collection and I never handle them. (special circumstances)
I wish everybody would be that way.
+1 ... There's no reason to handle them. They get nothing from it. I enjoy them just as much when I'm just feeding or observing them.
 

Mack&Cass

Arachnoprince
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Oct 14, 2007
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1,574
I only handle by accident...ie something runs out on to me (or up my pants in the case of our E. rufescens). I agree though that whether it is a $20 spider or a $300 spider, you should still treat it with the same amount of care if you're taking the risk by handling it. Just because it didn't cost you as much money as some of your other Ts doesn't mean that it's life is less valuable.

Cass
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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+1 ... There's no reason to handle them. They get nothing from it. I enjoy them just as much when I'm just feeding or observing them.
As long as you take the right precautions so your T doesnt get hurt I dont see a major problem with a little occasional handling.

One could argue not to handle because its "unnecessarry". Thats true but Isnt keeping them in your house in a cage is unnecessarry too? We only keep them for our enjoyment. And people also handle them for thier own enjoyment. I dont see the harm in holding your favorite docile specimen in a safe manner. They will get over the "stress". Some seem to have a high level of stress when handled, others seem not to mind at all. I dont see my B. smithi huddling in a corner pouting after I take him out to show people they are not monsters.

IMO The whole arguement of it being "unnecessarry and only for the greed of the owner" on anti-handling is pretty feeble when were talking about docile Ts.

Keep in mind i dont coddle my Ts everyday or hold them like some kind of mammal thinking they like it. More like when I rehouse or show them to the occasional house guest.
 

BCscorp

Arachnoprince
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As long as you take the right precautions so your T doesnt get hurt I dont see a major problem with a little occasional handling.

One could argue not to handle because its "unnecessarry". Thats true but Isnt keeping them in your house in a cage is unnecessarry too? We only keep them for our enjoyment. And people also handle them for thier own enjoyment. I dont see the harm in holding your favorite docile specimen in a safe manner. They will get over the "stress". Some seem to have a high level of stress when handled, others seem not to mind at all. I dont see my B. smithi huddling in a corner pouting after I take him out to show people they are not monsters.

IMO The whole arguement of it being "unnecessarry and only for the greed of the owner" on anti-handling is pretty feeble when were talking about docile Ts.

Keep in mind i dont coddle my Ts everyday or hold them like some kind of mammal thinking they like it. More like when I rehouse or show them to the occasional house guest.
I pretty much agree with this statement. I have only handled a few of my spiders, and those are the ones that climb out when I take the lid off the enclosure for maintenance. They usually wander around then head home after a few minutes. And I'll admit to liking it when my B. smithi comes out and watches a movie with me.:)
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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I pretty much agree with this statement. I have only handled a few of my spiders, and those are the ones that climb out when I take the lid off the enclosure for maintenance. They usually wander around then head home after a few minutes. And I'll admit to liking it when my B. smithi comes out and watches a movie with me.:)
Make sure your smithi sees this one. ;)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048696/
 

Raine

Arachnopeon
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Nov 12, 2010
Messages
10
I got my G. Rosea just three days ago. I adopted her and the person hadn't handled her in eight months. But I needed to move her to her new home (she was in a 5 gal and I bought her a 10 gal) so I ended up picking her up. She seems to like crawling all over me. She will even settle down into my hand and look like she is relaxing.

Is it bad to handle a tarantula who seems to have no problem with it? I would think keeping it in a little terrarium isn't a very exciting life for it if it keeps going up the side and walking onto me when I open the lid, and then when I try to put it back it doesn't want to go back--it keeps going up my arm and I have to actually work to get her back in! I checked to make sure the tank is the proper set up and she seems to like it well enough but she seems to like being on me more. Doesn't act stressed, doesn't fling hairs. Handling her makes me itch though it's worth it. :)
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
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I got my G. Rosea just three days ago. I adopted her and the person hadn't handled her in eight months. But I needed to move her to her new home (she was in a 5 gal and I bought her a 10 gal) so I ended up picking her up. She seems to like crawling all over me. She will even settle down into my hand and look like she is relaxing.

Is it bad to handle a tarantula who seems to have no problem with it? I would think keeping it in a little terrarium isn't a very exciting life for it if it keeps going up the side and walking onto me when I open the lid, and then when I try to put it back it doesn't want to go back--it keeps going up my arm and I have to actually work to get her back in! I checked to make sure the tank is the proper set up and she seems to like it well enough but she seems to like being on me more. Doesn't act stressed, doesn't fling hairs. Handling her makes me itch though it's worth it. :)

Tarantulas:
1.Dont enjoy the handleing.
2. dont need it.
3.Cant recognize you.
4.Dont need to have an exciting life since they are not complex enough animals.
5.When they web in your hand, is to "track" the unknown territory.
6. They wont talk to you, so its not possible to really know how much the stress if in fact afecting them in a mid-long term.
 

Raine

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
10
Well if they don't enjoy it she certainly doesn't seem to object to it. She isn't acting skittish or making threat signs or flicking hairs. Maybe they like walking around new territory? There has to be a reason why she prefers my arm to her tank. The room temp is about 24 degrees on average. So I'm uncertain why she would rather go up (since they are ground spiders) than back into her home.

In either case whether or not she needs it doesn't mean she dislikes it. In doing research I have found that nothing ill results from handling this species of T occasionally. Plus she seems docile in temperament, so I'm not going to just never handle her. I chose this breed for appearance and docile temperament. If I had wanted a spider that was just to look at I would have chosen a flashier one. But I like this one because it can be handled. If I note it causes any stress I will stop. But I just checked a recommended book and it says 999/1000 G. Rosea are okay to be handled.

I can understand she doesn't recognize me and that they can't talk. But as with any creature it will show signs of being stressed if it is. She doesn't 'web in my hand' she just stays there and is calm. Only when she starts to move does she sometimes web a bit. :)
 

Raine

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
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That's what I initially thought. But I went through tons of pictures and information about my set up and it's bang on now that I added more substrate. It's a 10 gallon with peat and garden soil substrate, a shallow water dish, a half log hide, and lots of places to burrow. She has dug out one corner and seems quite content when she is in there. Just that she likes to climb up the side and onto my arm or hand when I open the lid.

I have been told that all spiders have different temperaments and different things they will do and not do. For instance seeing that thread where the G. Rosea dragged the water dish over the cricket. The point in that? People watch movies with their tarantulas or just let them move about on them. I don't see it causing a problem so not sure why anyone would protest to handling a species that seems to be perfectly fine with or without it.
 

BCscorp

Arachnoprince
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Oct 22, 2007
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So how do...lets say an A. versicolour interpret a storm? The spider is way up high in the forest canopy and the wind is blowing like crazy. According to some the "simple minded spider" can't remember anything nor can it reason what is actually happening.
How do they get by with these random stressful events in the wild?
 
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