Tityus trinitatis birth

Brian S

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To the best of my knowledge, these are the first young born in the US. I plan to keep most if not all of this brood but the next time I will sell.
Anyway, I am very excited about this as it would appear these will be a staple in the hobby soon.
 

Ythier

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Be carreful the first instars are quite fragile...
 

xVOWx

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I asked my wife if we could name our daughter Tityus or Tityanna but needless to say she didnt approve of that name hahaha{D
LOL, well atleast you had the guts to try.
 

fusion121

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Be carreful the first instars are quite fragile...
Hi Eric
I've had ~90% success with my last brood by using containers sealed with gauze rather then lids (I think you mentioned the method in an older post). It works really well for this species, though they still need to be given water often and fed regularly.
 

Blaster

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As I said before, great job Brian and good luck with 'em! I love the color.
Blaster.
 

Ythier

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Hi Eric
I've had ~90% success with my last brood by using containers sealed with gauze rather then lids (I think you mentioned the method in an older post). It works really well for this species, though they still need to be given water often and fed regularly.

Hi Oliver,
Long time we didn't talk my friend !
Yes aeration is one of the keys, and I suppose most of the Tityus should be kept more dry than we think.
However I've had 0% success with the young trinitatis ! :eek: But some broods seem to be more fragile than others, I've had this problem also with serrulatus, essentially the first brood of the females, in which I had a lot of mortality, when I had 100% success with the following broods of the same females.
 

Brandelmouche

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Good news. That one is on my wish list Brian :} ;) Congrats,they are beautifull.
 

drapion

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Hi Eric
I've had ~90% success with my last brood by using containers sealed with gauze rather then lids (I think you mentioned the method in an older post). It works really well for this species, though they still need to be given water often and fed regularly.


Could you please explain this method a little bit more please..I would like to use this for some of my scorpling that I'm having some trouble with and see if it works..
 

Brian S

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You can also drill small holes up and down the sides of the vials. That will provide adequate ventilation. I do that with bark scorpion species which seem to do better with less humidity such as Babycurus, C vittatus etc.
 

fusion121

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You can also drill small holes up and down the sides of the vials. That will provide adequate ventilation. I do that with bark scorpion species which seem to do better with less humidity such as Babycurus, C vittatus etc.
I used that method with my previous brood with poor results (though its what I generally do for tropical species), it seems that they need really good ventilation with a low ambient humidity, while still having a moist substrate.

Here's the setup I use:


Eric could be right though and it may have more to do with the health of individual broods.
 

Mark Newton

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just a thought....

I think it is very important to remember that there are other variables here that will affect the outcome. People are stating roughly the amount of ventilation, water etc, but are missing the most important aspect and that is that every person commenting will have had a different relative humidity (RH) and temperature, the two most important environmental parameters. As we know, first instars have a very permeable membraneous exoskeleton and therefore RH is of the utmost importance as it is for the mother or she may acclimate and shut down water loss herself. It pays to have a hygrometer nearby and note values when trying to work out suitable setup conditions for a species.

I gather this species lives under bark. What are the environmental conditions in the wild for this species..roughly?
 

fusion121

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Oliver, How tall is that vial?
about 9cm give or take

just a thought....

I think it is very important to remember that there are other variables here that will affect the outcome. People are stating roughly the amount of ventilation, water etc, but are missing the most important aspect and that is that every person commenting will have had a different relative humidity (RH) and temperature, the two most important environmental parameters. As we know, first instars have a very permeable membraneous exoskeleton and therefore RH is of the utmost importance as it is for the mother or she may acclimate and shut down water loss herself. It pays to have a hygrometer nearby and note values when trying to work out suitable setup conditions for a species.

I gather this species lives under bark. What are the environmental conditions in the wild for this species..roughly?
Ventilation is essentially proportional to relative humidity in this case with high ventilation = ambient RH which is pretty constant in the UK and US. I've raised 3 broods of this species 2 of which have failed get to 3rd instar the only difference in this brood, that has done well, is the ventilation (one variable changing and 2 controls makes me pretty confident this is the case). So chances are that its the lower humidity that works, as I stated above. Of course there are other explanations such as ventilation making a less ideal environment for fungus growth etc.

This is likely a semi-arboreal species that would probably inhabit a lower humidity region in tropical enviroments.
 
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