Time to get more Ts...

Which one should be on the top of my list..?

  • Haplopelma lividum

    Votes: 7 31.8%
  • Psalmopoeus irminia

    Votes: 15 68.2%

  • Total voters
    22

Slide

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 26, 2002
Messages
63
Ok, it might have to wait 'til I move, but hey. That's just around the corner, so time to get cracking.. :)

I'm trying to figure out what to put at the top of my list...I keep waffling between a Psalmopoeus irminia and Haplopelma lividum. Right now my "collection" consists of a B.smithi (doesn't move, just sits around and looks pretty), and a B.albopilosum (has burrowed out of site, and stays there. Every now and then I see him scampering back into his burrow, but other than that, I have no idea he exists), so part of my debate is whether I want another terrestrial/burrowing species, or an arboreal. On the other hand, the H.lividum is quite striking in coloration, and burrowing can be directed such that the spider is still generally visible....

Thoughts? Anyone have experience with these? I know several people have ranted about the overly defensive side of the H.lividum, but this simply adds to the T's character, in my mind...
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
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Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Messages
1,709
Well, both of them hide a good deal. But if it came down to which was more likely to be seen, it would probably be the irminia. You said that you think defensiveness makes a spider interesting ? Well, you're in luck, 'cuz they are both mean tempered. The cobalt is the more psychotic of the two, but irminias can still be all too willing to bite . And since you already have a couple terrestrial/ burrowers, why not get an arboreal for a change ?
 

Valael

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
756
I had to vote irminia also. I just love the way they look. Don't have any experience with either one, though -- So I'll go with what Venom said.
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
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Jul 21, 2002
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I haven't kept them either, but I read forums a lot, and that's what I've heard about them.
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
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Sep 27, 2002
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While both are typically known to be quite defensive, they also both fall into the category of "Bill's top 5 beautiful spiders" I have both of these, and for what it's worth, I get to see the P. irminia almost all the time (albeit the dorsal view only) I haven't seen the H. lividum adult since the day I got her, and my sling got eaten by a cricket. As far as your personal safety goes, I think you more likely to wind up with a Psalmopeous on your head than the Haplopelma, if they are housed to their specific requirements. Overall, I'd pick the P. irminia, because you'll see it more, it should make more fascinating structures (even if it's a hider) and when it moves, you'll love watching it. Those tank-feet are so impressive to watch move faster than your eyes can track.

Best of luck with either choice,
Bill
 

Tarantula Lover

Psalmopoeus Lover
Old Timer
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Jul 21, 2002
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1,373
I vote for the irmini, because even though I dont have an irminia, I do have a Trinidad Chevron! Speedy! But either way its your decision! Go for what you like best! I would get an irminia! Good Luck!

James
 

Dean W

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 30, 2002
Messages
74
I'd personally go for the cobalt. The combination of aggression and perty colors, gives it its own mystique. =)
 

invertepet

Arachnolord
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Oct 4, 2002
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608
Cobalts are cheap right now, and beautiful spiders in their own right. P. irminia (Suntigers) are gorgeous, but a little trickier and more expensive.

bill
 
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Ephesians

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
353
If you can match the responsibility with the importance of humidity and temperature, both are needy but the P. irminia even moreso. I would choose the irminia; as Bill said you will see it more often than not and the foot tracking is extraordinary! Their beauty doesn't even compare to their speed, so more than likely you'll see streaks of black and orange instead of the actual form of the spider. I see this one a LOT more than I do my h. lividum. Which has constructed a marvelous burrow, but yes, though you are capable of guiding their burrow, they will more than likely block the plastic view you have inside with dirt. Mine did eventually...little bugger.

I think you more likely to wind up with a Psalmopeous on your head
Funny you should say so! lol. Slide, note my avatar to the left...the thing on my head...is my p. irminia. =D =D =D The actual picture and a few others from the same event are here...http://www.arachnopets.com/arachnoboards/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4286

Marcus
 

Arachnopuppy

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
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Jul 22, 2002
Messages
715
The cobalt is beautiful, but once you provide it with a home you will never see it ever again. What's beauty when you can never see it because it is always deep in its burrow? Mine's burrow looks like a volcano.
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
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Sep 27, 2002
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Originally posted by Ephesians
Funny you should say so! lol. Slide, note my avatar to the left...the thing on my head...is my p. irminia. =D =D =D
Suffice to say.. I had you on my mind when I wrote that ;)

Bill
 

Joy

Priestess of Pulchra-tude
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Oct 12, 2002
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903
Originally posted by lam
The cobalt is beautiful, but once you provide it with a home you will never see it ever again. What's beauty when you can never see it because it is always deep in its burrow?
Ah, but it's not ALWAYS hidden. You get a tantalizing glimpse now and then--usually about 3 AM, and usually a rear view disappearing down the burrow mouth, LOL. That is enough for me, but it might not be enough for everybody, so I think it's as well that the disadvantages of H. lividum should be openly discussed. I had one in a set-up where the burrow was against the glass, and the darned thing webbed over it (in spite of its being covered with black plexiglass). Those tantalizing glimpses in the wee hours, along with the occasional lightning-quick tackle of prey placed outside the burrow, are likely to be all you're going to see of it. P. irminia is much more visible IME, and as beautiful as H. lividum in a different way, so that's what I'm voting for. But I wouldn't want anyone to think I still don't love lividums :)

Joy
 

Ephesians

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Messages
353
Not only the beauty and the visibility factor as we have all mentioned, ( I believe Bill and Joy as well as I ) have both species; but you will be able to observe a far more spectacular housing demonstration as well.

note: Bill posted a pic of his P. irinia's housing, but I don't remember the thread...Bill, do you?

If they don't make a unique "hammock" construction they will sure build one heck of an "Air Hotel". Quite an awesome site to behold.

Marcus
 

Slide

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 26, 2002
Messages
63
Wow! What can I say other than, thanks for all the information! I guess I'm pretty much convinced the Suntiger is the way to go, although I'm sure I'll end up with at least one Cobalt in the future as well...

Ephesians: Yes, the thread involving your photoshoot with the Suntiger was quite amusing! :)

Yeah, I think that decides it.. Hrm. Now I just have to move. And probably wait 'til it warms up some before ordering spiderlings...
 

Kugellager

ArachnoJester
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Jul 24, 2002
Messages
2,354
I also have a suntiger. It is my first T. I got it as a freebie in a screwed-up scorpion order. I know it was just to suck me into the T hobby :D...Have 6 T's now.

I received a 3/4 inch sling last January and now it is in the middle of another molt sealed in its burrow. It was about 4.5 inches across before this molt. I have had no problems careing for it even though this was my first T. I have as yet seen no indication of its reputation of being agressive. It always just hunkers down in its burrow when I clean the cage. Come to think of it, it is only out of its burrow after lights out at night. It also has not webbed up its enclosure as I have heard they are reputed to do.

I have wondered if its reputation can be attributed to it being kept in too small of an enclosure. I have mine (now that it is nearly full size) in a 10 gallon upended tank with about 6" of peat and some bark. It has a nice silk-lined burrow but has not silked anything else up.

The coloration is beautiful though even near a molt.

John
];')
 
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