Tiger Beetle Rearing

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
I posted this on beetleforum, but I'm gonna post it here too to increase my chances of gaining information.

I was out doing some survey work with a few of my friends and colleagues, and I made sure to give myself some time to collect at my leisure. There were many tiger beetles that dotted the paths we walked upon. As an entomologist, you love to see tiger beetles while collecting. Tiger beetles are indicators of pristine habitat, and pristine habitat is where you usually see the most diversity among insects.

I had to collect a tiger beetle! After 15 minutes of chasing them around with my net, I managed to capture one. I'll have to double check, but I believe the species I have is Cicindela punctuata.* I've been doing a bit of research, but I was hoping someone could give me the low down on keeping and breeding Cicindelids. Thanks!

*It's been confirmed, the species is Cicindela punctuata.
 

billrogers

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 18, 2016
Messages
216
I cannot help you with info, but I definitely hope you keep us posted with whatever you do!
 

pannaking22

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2011
Messages
4,138
Adults will need to be fed every couple days and appreciate some nice hides to rest under. Lighting location is important and should preferably be directly above the enclosure. Lights on the sides will just serve as an attractant to the beetles and it really stresses them out. They need a somewhat sandy soil to oviposit in and larvae can be kept together in a large enclosure or separated out into individual vials or deli cups. There is a little bit of cannibalism if you keep the larvae together, but it isn't too bad from what I've heard. Larvae need to be fed frequently (I think it's once every 3 days, but I could be wrong). Development should only take a year.

Keep in mind this is all secondhand from talking a little bit with a friend of mine who has kept and successfully reared several different species, along with just looking at his photos, so I might be a little off on feeding frequency, etc., but this should hopefully give you a start!
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
Adults will need to be fed every couple days and appreciate some nice hides to rest under. Lighting location is important and should preferably be directly above the enclosure. Lights on the sides will just serve as an attractant to the beetles and it really stresses them out. They need a somewhat sandy soil to oviposit in and larvae can be kept together in a large enclosure or separated out into individual vials or deli cups. There is a little bit of cannibalism if you keep the larvae together, but it isn't too bad from what I've heard. Larvae need to be fed frequently (I think it's once every 3 days, but I could be wrong). Development should only take a year.

Keep in mind this is all secondhand from talking a little bit with a friend of mine who has kept and successfully reared several different species, along with just looking at his photos, so I might be a little off on feeding frequency, etc., but this should hopefully give you a start!
All of those conditions are met, and I'm considering switching to native soil.

Also, how bad is cannibalization in the adults? Three of my adults have mysteriously disappeared, and I noticed an elytron and several legs scattered across the enclosure...
 

Hisserdude

Arachnoking
Active Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
2,226
Also, how bad is cannibalization in the adults? Three of my adults have mysteriously disappeared, and I noticed an elytron and several legs scattered across the enclosure...
It can be pretty bad in some Carabids, you really have to keep them well fed or else they turn on each other. The Pterostichus species that I have kept are very cannibalistic and will tear each other apart if you forget to feed them once.
 
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