Thrigmopoeus insignis

Jones0911

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
406
I've looked on Google and the search option on this site, found nothing related to the needed info.

Does anyone have any care info on this species?

All I know is that they are deep Burrowers does anyone know the growth rate? Humid? Defensive? Etc

Thanks!!!
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
I've looked on Google and the search option on this site, found nothing related to the needed info.

Does anyone have any care info on this species?

All I know is that they are deep Burrowers does anyone know the growth rate? Humid? Defensive? Etc

Thanks!!!

Im curious as well.
here is some Notes on Thrigmopoeus truculentus, a separate species from the same genus, that has an overlapping native habitat, so they would be sharing atleast somewhat similar natural habitats.

I've been using this to go off of care for the ones i just picked up:
From India.
"Endemic to the Western Ghats of Karnataka and Maharashtra, this species is found in Amboli in the north and Madikeri in the south at an altitudinal range of 200 to 1,000 m"

"This ground spider is primarily found in moist deciduous and evergreen forests. The species occurs very patchily, with burrows on soil bunds with adequate vegetation cover. Burrows occasionally occur on flat ground. In examining the burrow aggregations, we have found the composition to have one adult female with several juveniles and sub adults from different clutches in individual burrows close to the adult female's burrow. Observations on population indicates a very high mortality rate in juveniles/subadults, of more than 95% in the first two years. Dispersal rates are unknown. Healthy population of spiders/burrows are usually found in areas with very little disturbance."


i haven't had much actual experience with this species myself, as I've just recently acquired some, but hopefully somebody can Chime in and give us some more info!
 

SingaporeB

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 25, 2013
Messages
40
I don't recall ever seeing an adult female for sale. I have read that 95% mortality rate before.

It would be great if you documented your experience with the slings you have.
 

spotropaicsav

Arachnobaron
Joined
Apr 3, 2017
Messages
432
Im curious as well.
here is some Notes on Thrigmopoeus truculentus, a separate species from the same genus, that has an overlapping native habitat, so they would be sharing atleast somewhat similar natural habitats.

I've been using this to go off of care for the ones i just picked up:
From India.
"Endemic to the Western Ghats of Karnataka and Maharashtra, this species is found in Amboli in the north and Madikeri in the south at an altitudinal range of 200 to 1,000 m"

"This ground spider is primarily found in moist deciduous and evergreen forests. The species occurs very patchily, with burrows on soil bunds with adequate vegetation cover. Burrows occasionally occur on flat ground. In examining the burrow aggregations, we have found the composition to have one adult female with several juveniles and sub adults from different clutches in individual burrows close to the adult female's burrow. Observations on population indicates a very high mortality rate in juveniles/subadults, of more than 95% in the first two years. Dispersal rates are unknown. Healthy population of spiders/burrows are usually found in areas with very little disturbance."


i haven't had much actual experience with this species myself, as I've just recently acquired some, but hopefully somebody can Chime in and give us some more info!
How are yours doing? OP, do you currently own, or are you looking to keep these? I don't have any knowledge on this sp. , but will be reading thread to learn as well...
 

Jones0911

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
406
I don't have any at all waiting for good care information first.

Not only that there seems to be a high death rate so I might not buy any@all
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
How are yours doing? OP, do you currently own, or are you looking to keep these? I don't have any knowledge on this sp. , but will be reading thread to learn as well...
sorry its been a while since i came back to this thread.

so Far mine are doing great!
Both have recently molted, both went flawlessly. they didn't gain much size in regards to length, but there was a noticeable difference, and their a much more pronounced Deep brown now.


based on their natural location I've been trying to keep it as close to that as possible. I've kept it pretty humid, with half the enclosure with fairly Damp(but not wet) substrate, with the other half fairly dry. substrate has been a mixture of 50%coco-fiber and the other half a Peat/vermeculite mixture.
They seem to transition between the two sides pretty evenly. Ive noticed both have started to heavily web up the drier of the two sides, but when ever looking a them or checking on them, they are almost always out sitting on the damp side of the enclosure. they do seem to be pretty heavy webbers, and while neither has actually tried to dig a Burrow, they have moved around a good amount of substrate.


they are still fairly small, ~.75" so they are in small condiment cups, most likely going to be brought into a larger, deeper enclosure once another week has passed since this last molt.

As far as behavior they seem to be incredible and Fearless eaters with a Huge appetite. i started with pre killed small half crickets, and after seeing how viciously they handled those the next feeding i tried live pinheads.
no issues there with them taking them the second they entered the cup. they will immediately tackle anything that moves it seems, and I've yet to have an issue with them not eating immediately.


they are very fast of course, and seem to be pretty skittish, but i guess we will see once they have a little more room to dig down and burrow.

From what I've read on their habitats in india, they apparently like to dig deep burrows in damp earth, so hopefully once i get them in their new enclosures i can see how they take to making their burrows.

So far i haven't had many issues and i am actually tempted to pick up a few more of these guys. as far as slings go, these guys are for sure the most active and most interesting of any i have owned.

ill come back and update this thread in ~a week once i rehouse them and see how they handle the deeper substrate.
and ill see if i can grab some good pictures of them when i get home tonight to post on here.
 

Jones0911

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
406
sorry its been a while since i came back to this thread.

so Far mine are doing great!
Both have recently molted, both went flawlessly. they didn't gain much size in regards to length, but there was a noticeable difference, and their a much more pronounced Deep brown now.


based on their natural location I've been trying to keep it as close to that as possible. I've kept it pretty humid, with half the enclosure with fairly Damp(but not wet) substrate, with the other half fairly dry. substrate has been a mixture of 50%coco-fiber and the other half a Peat/vermeculite mixture.
They seem to transition between the two sides pretty evenly. Ive noticed both have started to heavily web up the drier of the two sides, but when ever looking a them or checking on them, they are almost always out sitting on the damp side of the enclosure. they do seem to be pretty heavy webbers, and while neither has actually tried to dig a Burrow, they have moved around a good amount of substrate.


they are still fairly small, ~.75" so they are in small condiment cups, most likely going to be brought into a larger, deeper enclosure once another week has passed since this last molt.

As far as behavior they seem to be incredible and Fearless eaters with a Huge appetite. i started with pre killed small half crickets, and after seeing how viciously they handled those the next feeding i tried live pinheads.
no issues there with them taking them the second they entered the cup. they will immediately tackle anything that moves it seems, and I've yet to have an issue with them not eating immediately.


they are very fast of course, and seem to be pretty skittish, but i guess we will see once they have a little more room to dig down and burrow.

From what I've read on their habitats in india, they apparently like to dig deep burrows in damp earth, so hopefully once i get them in their new enclosures i can see how they take to making their burrows.

So far i haven't had many issues and i am actually tempted to pick up a few more of these guys. as far as slings go, these guys are for sure the most active and most interesting of any i have owned.

ill come back and update this thread in ~a week once i rehouse them and see how they handle the deeper substrate.
and ill see if i can grab some good pictures of them when i get home tonight to post on here.
Thank you, i probably missed it but did you say these were slow growers?

Like how far apart are each molts??
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
Thank you, i probably missed it but did you say these were slow growers?

Like how far apart are each molts??
i cant say for sure yet, as they've only molted once since I've had them. But to put it in some perspective.
when i received these, i had gotten 2 T. insignis, 5 OBT's and 4 P. Cams all together in one purchase. All at the time 2i, with the Cams being 3i.
in this time, both insignis have molted once each (2i to 3i) (about a week ago)
All 5 OBT's have molted twice (2i to 4i)
and my P. Cams all molted once (3i to 4i) and one of my cams looks like they might molt again in the next coming weeks, as its refusing food and looking plump.
as well as this i picked up a 2i B smithi 1 month before i got these, and it just now molted.
so, Slower then both OBT's and P Cam's BUT much faster then my B. Smithi. so not too bad so far, kind of in the middle road.
Ill keep updating with Molts and such to get a better idea of growth rate and how much each molt. like said, they didn't seem to get too much Longer with the last molt, but each has gotten a lot bulkier in their carapace/abdomin and legs.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
I don't recall ever seeing an adult female for sale. I have read that 95% mortality rate before.

I don't know who writes this stuff. I have a couple of females (adult & juvenile) & keep them like any other Asian terrestrial, moist substrate, moderate ventilation. They like to dig and spin a lot, basically act like a Chilobrachys. I think that what they're referring to is how many slings make it to adulthood, and all tarantula species are going to have a 90%+ mortality rate, that's why they have large egg sacs. You're taking this out of context and running with it. Slow down.

To me they're interesting because their in an odd subfamily, apparently isolated on the Indian subcontinent for many thousands of years.

BTW, I've heard that w/c stirmi have a high mortality rate in captivity, which is also not true. A local reptile dealer got some stirmi is on several occasions a few years ago, and I handpicked the skinniest ones in the worst condition, because I knew I could give them better care than the pet shops they were destined for. Every one did fine. Moist substrate (though not excessive), moderate ventilation, and some good meals to fatter them up ( a dozen adult crickets per feeding) and they all looked great. Anytime you hear of high mortality rates, be suspicious. There's more involved and you should ask questions before passing misleading bits along. That's how rumors get started.
 
Last edited:

TarantulAddict

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 13, 2018
Messages
1
I just picked up one of these at my local pet shop today any Updated information you guys may have would help greatly because I can't find anything about them still.
 
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