Thoughts about T-keeping experiences and getting more T's.

Reest

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 9, 2017
Messages
11
I've been thoroughly hooked on spiders for months and I've had my two for one. I've read a lot of people started getting more tarantulas not soon after getting their first, and I want to do the same!

I've spent every day for the past two months researching Tarantulas and I genuinley think I can care for more spiders. I already own apropriate enclosures, I have appropriate substrate, hides and feeders at my disposal and I know which species I'm interested in, how to care for them, and the money to buy them.

But then I come down to earth and realize my practical experience with Tarantulas is nearly nonexistent. I've had no T's molt in my care. My G.rosea sling was uninterested in food while at the surface and has now burrowed and closed off the entrance, and my A.geniculata is in premolt. So none of them have eaten yet. And as a result of them not wanting to eat I have not had to deal with any threat postures, strikes or hair-kicking. I've also never had to rehouse them or move them except for getting them in their enclosures which worked out flawlessly. And as a result of that I've never had to catch an escaped T.

Some of these experiences are things that are vital to keeping tarantulas and some are things you want to avoid (if possible) while keeping them. But they are all nontheless important experiences because they will probably happen someday and when that day comes I need to be sure I know what I'm doing. To me, the thought of owning several tarantulas and never had these experiences feels irresponsible, and I don't want to cause pain to an animal because I couldn't care for it correctly.

It's not that I dont know what to do, it's that I've never done it before.

I don't know if I'm worrying to much or if this is reasonable thinking. Should I keep myself from getting more untill I've had to physically deal with the majority of these things, or will things just happen when they happen? Had you experienced T-keepers gone through all of this before expanding your collection?

NOTE: I'm writing this at 2AM and these are just my unfiltered thoughts, If I'm not making any sense tell me and I'll try to rephrase what i mean
 

Arachnomaniac19

Arachnolord
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Messages
654
I'd stick with more hardy and slow Ts until you feel ready. Maybe try out a GBB? I'd also recomend getting an adult T. Say Aphonopelma seemanni or an Avicularia avicularia.
 

sasker

Arachnoangel
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
794
You can have several Ts for quite some time without having them escape, kick hair or threat-posture you. Personally I do not think you need to wait until you get your next spider. Only if you start getting faster, feistier species you are more likely to come across the experiences that you fear. Just wait a few more months until you move over to such species and order some more easy going ones in the meantime. If you think you can handle more Ts, you probably can. If you think you are not ready for feisty Ts, you probably aren't. But I definitely understand your 'itch' to buy more, especially if your current ones are not eating or are in premolt :)
 

GingerC

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 10, 2017
Messages
117
So, let me get this straight:
Your Ts haven't eaten in your care
They haven't molted in your care
They haven't even so much as threat postured you...

...and you think you shouldn't get more?? If you have a few Ts, at least there's always something interesting going on. :) Maybe try out a few more "beginner" species until you think you're ready.
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
556
You aren't reinventing the wheel. There are so many here that have gone before you. There are numerous videos explaining things. I think you are overthinking things. The best way to learn is on the job. Stay within yourself, have a plan before you start any task, no matter how simple. Respect your T's and give them space. You'll find most things are pretty easy. Things like rehousing a fast or defensive tarantula will make your heart race sometimes no matter how many times you have done it before.
Also, don't be a helicopter owner. By a helicopter owner, I mean one that has to swoop in and rescue your T every time you think something is wrong. They are pretty resilient and most often get it right without your help.
Don't overthink it, enjoy your new hobby. Buy more T's...
 

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
92
I got three Ts last week, two for me and one for my gf. I got a GBB and an OBT. She got a rosehair. All three of my Ts are an inch. They've all fed, two of them twice, my OBT is acting weird but it's whatever, when I unpacked him he threw a threat pose, haha. No escapes but I did have to rehouse once just felt like their first homes didn't seem suitable. I left the OBT alone because of his weird behavior and his crazy webbing. Figure he might molt. Anyways, my gf wanted a Versicolor and I went online saw a sale and ended up puttin in an order for four more Ts, this is my cutoff point, no more for a while until we have our own home, lol. But I think it was it is, you gotta bite the bullet and enjoy this hobby. It's a vast learning experience!
 

Reest

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 9, 2017
Messages
11
Thanks for all the great replies everyone, I sincerely appreciate the help!
I'm really exited to go deeper into this hobby and learn more about keeping Tarantulas and spiders in general.
Very thankful that i have this great community for support!
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,825
Should I keep myself from getting more untill I've had to physically deal with the majority of these things, or will things just happen when they happen? Had you experienced T-keepers gone through all of this before expanding your collection?
It's good that you are thinking about these issues, because we sometimes see people who, mere weeks after owning a docile terrestrial (or even just a sling), overestimate their ability and prematurely jump right into more challenging species.

That being said, as long as you stick with the beginner-friendly species, I don't see a problem with getting a few more a month into the hobby. The benefits of having several are that 1) you have more chances to observe and interact with them, and 2) you gain experience more quickly.

My own experience is fairly atypical in that I had my first tarantula (an adult female Avicularia avicularia) for 5 months before I got my second (a juvenile Avicularia avicularia). Then I waited 13 months before getting my next two (Grammostola pulchra), and another year before the next (Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens). I don't buy tarantulas very often (or many at a time), because I have limited space.
 

mack1855

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Sep 5, 2016
Messages
577
And I might add,keep records of whats going on with your animals.
Molt dates,feeding(confirming they actually ate)dates.etc,etc..
Large collections can get away from you,as in regards to who did what,and when.
 

PanzoN88

Arachnodemon
Joined
Sep 15, 2014
Messages
693
Very good way of thinking. It took me two years before I bought my first defensive tarantula.
 
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