This list could get pretty long....

JJC

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 5, 2016
Messages
0
Recently acquired my first T., a GBB, and I can already see where this is going....
I never realized the seemingly infinite number of choices out there. So my question is two part...

1. Recommendations for the next one (or two). I was thinking maybe an arboreal or at least something a bit different than the GBB, for variety's sake. I would prefer a T that stays fairly visible.

2. Specific Ts to avoid, based mainly on bite risk. I realize that a bite is almost inevitable at some point and I would like to steer clear of any species whose venom would be considered dangerous, relatively speaking. Of course I can handle a swollen/painful finger or an arm that might be a little uncomfortable for a few days. What I want to avoid is the trip to the ER with CNS or CV issues. I know that toxicity is a relative term and we all won't react the same to a given bite...is there some kind of "venom hierarchy" that can be used as a guide?

Thanks in advance for all the great feedback...
 

Sarkhan42

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2015
Messages
725
Recently acquired my first T., a GBB, and I can already see where this is going....
I never realized the seemingly infinite number of choices out there. So my question is two part...

1. Recommendations for the next one (or two). I was thinking maybe an arboreal or at least something a bit different than the GBB, for variety's sake. I would prefer a T that stays fairly visible.

2. Specific Ts to avoid, based mainly on bite risk. I realize that a bite is almost inevitable at some point and I would like to steer clear of any species whose venom would be considered dangerous, relatively speaking. Of course I can handle a swollen/painful finger or an arm that might be a little uncomfortable for a few days. What I want to avoid is the trip to the ER with CNS or CV issues. I know that toxicity is a relative term and we all won't react the same to a given bite...is there some kind of "venom hierarchy" that can be used as a guide?

Thanks in advance for all the great feedback...
In general, any tarantula from the "Old world"(Africa, Asia, ect) and Australia have very potent venom of the kind you described in your post. If you want a display spider, can't go wrong with A geniculata honestly. If you're looking for an arboreal, look into the Avicularia genus.
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Visibility: A. genic or B. vagans

Arboreal: A.versicolor or metallica

Both?: maybe a T. ockerti. Get pretty large are kept more like a fossorial (debated)
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,160
Both?: maybe a T. ockerti. Get pretty large are kept more like a fossorial (debated)
Never heard that they are fossorial at all - semi arboreal species who will live comfortably in short bushes when water levels rise in their natural habitat. So not 'fully' arboreal tree dwellers, but not fully terrestrial either. I have never heard anyone suggest that they are fossorial.
 

Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,552
actually getting bit is fairly rare. a keeper here has gone 40 years without getting bit. ive never been or even close to being bit in my 6 years. the only NW genus of T that has argueably strong venom is Psalmopoeus. the only thing you really need to worry about is the size of the fangs, thatll do the most damage. just avoid old world species and you'll be fine. id recommend a Avicularia, Acanthoscurria, Nhandu, Lasiodora, Brachypelma.
 

magicmed

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 4, 2016
Messages
403
B. Vagans, smithi, emilia, boehmei, albopilosum
A. Versicolor, Avicularia, purpurea, metallica
G. Pulchripes, pulchra
A. Seemani

Some of my favorites
 

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
1,021
I realize that a bite is almost inevitable at some point
No, as long as you don´t handle the T´s and take precautions while doing maintenance, rehousing´s etc., bites are luckily rare. With that being said, I think it´s a wise decision of you to avoid OW species for now.
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Never heard that they are fossorial at all - semi arboreal species who will live comfortably in short bushes when water levels rise in their natural habitat. So not 'fully' arboreal tree dwellers, but not fully terrestrial either. I have never heard anyone suggest that they are fossorial.
Isn't that what fossorial means? or do I have the wrong word?
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,160
1. Recommendations for the next one (or two). I was thinking maybe an arboreal or at least something a bit different than the GBB, for variety's sake. I would prefer a T that stays fairly visible.
I don't have a lot of experience with arboreal, but my two A. avicularia stay out and visible all the time. My G. pulchripes are always visible as well and grow very large.
2. Specific Ts to avoid, based mainly on bite risk. I realize that a bite is almost inevitable at some point and I would like to steer clear of any species whose venom would be considered dangerous, relatively speaking. Of course I can handle a swollen/painful finger or an arm that might be a little uncomfortable for a few days. What I want to avoid is the trip to the ER with CNS or CV issues. I know that toxicity is a relative term and we all won't react the same to a given bite...is there some kind of "venom hierarchy" that can be used as a guide?
Being bitten is not inevitable and can easily be avoided. There are people here who have had tarantulas for decades and never been bitten. Don't handle them, always expect the unexpected, use the necessary tools required for feeding and maintenance, and just have an overall respect for them and you will minimize your chances of being bitten.
Having said that, I appreciate that you want to steer clear of more toxic venom. My suggestion is to stick to the New World species from the Americas and surrounding islands.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
10,726
Recommendations for the next one (or two)
I suggest you learn how to take care of a single T successfully, understand their behavior as slings and adults before collecting more.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,160
Isn't that what fossorial means? or do I have the wrong word?
Fossorial are obligate (as opposed to opportunistic) burrowers. Anyone who lives primarily underground. H. lividum is fossorial.
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,160
I feel embarrassed. Thanks for clearing that up
Don't be embarrassed! Arboreal, terrestrial, fossorial are the three groups. There is no specific term for semi-arboreal. I just wanted to avoid someone setting them up incorrectly.
Because they can be a cranky bunch waving their bums in the air and kicking hairs all over. :)
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Don't be embarrassed! Arboreal, terrestrial, fossorial are the three groups. There is no specific term for semi-arboreal. I just wanted to avoid someone setting them up incorrectly.
Because they can be a cranky bunch waving their bums in the air and kicking hairs all over. :)
It is super adorable....until the itching begins.
 
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