Thinking of getting my 1st T.

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
It's true of that locality in general, the "blue" is certainly more skittish, and like Reds/Yellows. Only E sp Red and E sp Yellow have that great disposition.

Adult female Reds go for about 125-150$
I haven't seen any Yellows, sling or adults for sale regularly for over 3 years.

My MM Yellow in that picture is going to die a bachelor!

I hope there is a female for him :(

I was shocked how fast and skittish the pulcheramiklaasi blue could be
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Dec 8, 2006
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13,227
Breed your MM yellow with a MF red! Make Euathlus sp orange!!!

(Joke)
No FRANKENTARANTULAS would ever be created by me, not at all. I leave that to the irresponsible idiots who have no respect for the hobby or the people in it.
 

cold blood

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Jan 19, 2014
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12,116
That's because I keep pounding the drums for E. sp Red and E. sp Yellow WORLD DOMINATION hahahah
Yeah, y'all can blame viper for jacking the prices up, he's campaigned tirelessly for the species!
 

cold blood

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Staff member
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Messages
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No FRANKENTARANTULAS would ever be created by me, not at all. I leave that to the irresponsible idiots who have no respect for the hobby or the people in it.
Ahhh, I knew we were going to see that word...frankentarantulas...I expected frankenspiders though:bored:
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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I hope there is a female for him :(

I was shocked how fast and skittish the pulcheramiklaasi blue could be
They are quite fast and skittish for their size. Some kick hairs rather quickly.

I wish there was. I've looked and there appears no female in sight. Only one person I'm aware of, and that female was already paired. He's a great T too. I feel so bummed that he's going to die so soon. He's been super to observe, even as a MM.
 

shining

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 15, 2011
Messages
755
This is just not true...they make fine staple feeders, they are fatty, but there's no nutrient deficiencies involved with them...most of my slings are raised almost exclusively on mealworms (just because it makes things easier).....being fattier just means you need to feed a little less often.
Let me rephrase that into something a lot less disagreeable as it was a vague blanket statement I made and not just wrong. They aren't the best choice and they aren't the worst. Feeding as a staple isn't the best and isn't the worst. My point was there is better feeders and if we are looking at what's best for our arachnids would it not be feeding them the best feeder as a staple diet?

Here's a link to the nutritional value content of the most common feeders to compare them.

https://dubiaroachdepot.com/guidance/dubia-roaches-vs-other-feeder-insects

Anyways, I do feed my scorplings and slings mealworms when I have them to fatten them up faster and because it's just so easy to cut one in half and throw a piece here and another piece there. I also do the same with dubias though and it's just as easy but more nutritional.
 

Haemus

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
128
This is just not true...they make fine staple feeders, they are fatty, but there's no nutrient deficiencies involved with them...most of my slings are raised almost exclusively on mealworms (just because it makes things easier).....being fattier just means you need to feed a little less often.
Could I apply this rule to my juveniles too? I've fed them crickets maybe twice so far in 11 feedings, the rest meal worms. My cricket husbandry needs work unfortunately.
 

Nephrite

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Messages
150
My suggestions are;
Eauthlus Sp. Red - If you want a somewhat handable tarantula.
A. geniculata - If you want a fast growing, big, ferocious T.
GBB Tarantula - If you want to see the beautiful webbings and colors.
OBT - Just kidding don't ever get that as a first tarantula.
Here are my choices :)
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Dec 8, 2006
Messages
13,227
My cricket husbandry needs work unfortunately.
You can't keep crix alive? Or are you breeding them? They aren't hard to keep alive. I've bred crickets without even knowing what I was doing, the babies are super TINY.
 

Haemus

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
128
You can't keep crix alive? Or are you breeding them? They aren't hard to keep alive. I've bred crickets without even knowing what I was doing, the babies are super TINY.
Just keeping them alive lol. I had a lot of cannibalizing that makes me think my container was way too small for them. How big of an enclosure do you use for 2 dozen?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Just keeping them alive lol. I had a lot of cannibalizing that makes me think my container was way too small for them. How big of an enclosure do you use for 2 dozen?
wow, you have issues hahah. It's easy. I keep them in a basic KK that is 8" by 6" wide, height not important. I also put in egg crate so they have more surface area to move around and thus don't crush each other, esp when I get them from the store.

I also provide hydration and cricket food too.
 

Nephrite

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Messages
150
Just keeping them alive lol. I had a lot of cannibalizing that makes me think my container was way too small for them. How big of an enclosure do you use for 2 dozen?
Yeah most important thing to stop them from cannibalizing is egg crates. Crickets have their own territory and will eat eachother for it if there isn't enough. They can share with a mate, but that's pretty much it.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Dec 8, 2006
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Yeah most important thing to stop them from cannibalizing is egg crates. Crickets have their own territory and will eat eachother for it if there isn't enough. They can share with a mate, but that's pretty much it.
That's news to me. Where did you learn that? I didn't know they were territorial, that's pretty fascinating.
 

Garth Vader

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2016
Messages
436
How phobic are you? This is something to consider before taking on T ownership. I'd recommend visiting a T first, at a pet store or someone's home and watch them eat, move around, etc. Also, how are you around regular spiders? If you avoid them, start approaching them. Catch them in the house to let them outside, curiously approach their webs, and so on. If you are quite scared, you need to work up to something like owning a T and seeing it daily. Do not allow your fear to get in the way of taking care of an animal.

I am a behavioral therapist and treat anxiety disorders, including phobias. Id never recommend starting with the biggest challenge but working up to it. I have people watch videos, read about spiders, catch and release house spiders, let a house spider run across their hand, etc before introducing then to my T. They do not handle my T nor do I. If I have to move him I poke his butt with a paintbrush. I have an Aphonopelma Anax and he's a mellow bugger. I also bought a female Euathlus sp red, coming in the mail this week. (Yay!) I think these are good species both for me as a beginner and for my clients who are afraid of Ts.
 
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