Thinking about getting a few Pasimachus sp.- Warrior beetles

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
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Jul 3, 2016
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I have seen these are part of several You tube T keepers collections, looks like they are a blast to watch eat. Anyone here keep/kept them? I have read some info on them via google but not much out there on captive care.
Any people who have some first hand experience with the genus, your words would be much appreciated.
Thanks !
 

BobBarley

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Sep 16, 2015
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I own three Pasimachus depressus that I got from @ErinM31 and they are a blast to keep, once you get them more acclimated to captivity, as captive breeding is extremely difficult with this species, especially getting them from larvae to adults. When I first got them they seemed really shy but after a month or so they started taking large superworms quite frequently and allowed me to watch! I've found that the best method to get them to eat right away is to gently and slowly place the prey about an inch to three inches in front of them. Here's a video I took, YouTube for some reason made the quality worse:
Basically moist (not too moist) substrate with a few pieces of cork bark will work. Substrate should be a mix of about 50/50 sand and coco fiber (I use topsoil in place of coco fiber, but I'd imagine either would work). Feed often maybe two superworms a week or something as they're metabolisms are higher than t's because the wander around a lot more. You can feed a wide variety of live or prekilled food but I've found that they are more enticed by mealworms/superworms than by crickets. With this species or at least with this specific locality, both Erin and I have had success keeping them communally, and I did get some mating in this time-lapse vid:
As you can see I also supplement their diet once in a while with small pieces of fruit, this is probably not necessary but not detrimental either. I separated the three a few days after the video just in case. They were together for about a week with no signs of aggression between them (that I could see). Good luck, this species is a lot of fun to keep!:)
 

ErinM31

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@BobBarley covered everything well! :) They are definitely cool beetles and I've kept pairs together for months without any signs of aggression. I suspect that there would only be aggression if they are overcrowded or underfed.
 

Nick H

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Feb 12, 2016
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Do they bite when handled? I'm thinking about getting some P viridans and my 3 year old might be heart broken if he can't hold them once in a while.
 

Andy00

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Feb 4, 2016
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I had one that was wild caught, it lived in my care for about 5 months and died recently :( he was so much fun to watch eat, it was awesome. Make sure the lid of the enclosure that doesn't disturb them too much when you close it, because he would always drop his food and run when I closed his enclosure lid too hard. He was great, I'm going to preserve his body in hand sanitizer. Also, handling I believe would be okay but you'd have to be very careful. Mine would bite down on my tongs whenever I tried to get un-eaten mealworms haha and he'd bite down VERY hard.
 

BobBarley

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Do they bite when handled? I'm thinking about getting some P viridans and my 3 year old might be heart broken if he can't hold them once in a while.
I haven't tried but I wouldn't risk it because just watching them feed, it feels like a bite would really hurt! Though P. viridans is one of the smaller and more shy Pasimavhus. I had a couple and I almost never saw them eat.
 

ErinM31

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Do they bite when handled? I'm thinking about getting some P viridans and my 3 year old might be heart broken if he can't hold them once in a while.
I expect that they would and so have always grabbed them in a way to not give them the opportunity (a thumb and forefinger on either side of where the thorax and abdomen meet seems to work well). In addition, they can give off a pungent odor when handled (it seems harmless on the skin at least and the smell can be removed with vinegar if one does not wish to wait until it dissipates). I would not recommend these beetles for handling. Have you considered a species of ox or rhinoceros beetle? These large beetles are probably the best for handling as they are both very sturdy and are harmless. Some species of cockroach would also be good options if looking for an insect that can be handled (to my knowledge, all cockroaches are harmless to handle, but I would not recommend trying to hold those that are small, fast and fragile).
 

Andy00

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I was wondering, because I never found the info; what's they're average life expectancy as beetles? And does it depend on the gender?
 

BobBarley

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I was wondering, because I never found the info; what's they're average life expectancy as beetles? And does it depend on the gender?
To my understanding adults can live for a few years-several years from pupation to death, but these are all wild caught so we have no idea how long they have already lived.

I expect that they would and so have always grabbed them in a way to not give them the opportunity (a thumb and forefinger on either side of where the thorax and abdomen meet seems to work well). In addition, they can give off a pungent odor when handled (it seems harmless on the skin at least and the smell can be removed with vinegar if one does not wish to wait until it dissipates). I would not recommend these beetles for handling. Have you considered a species of ox or rhinoceros beetle? These large beetles are probably the best for handling as they are both very sturdy and are harmless. Some species of cockroach would also be good options if looking for an insect that can be handled (to my knowledge, all cockroaches are harmless to handle, but I would not recommend trying to hold those that are small, fast and fragile).
I wouldn't reccomend ox or rhinoceros beetles for handling because of their spiky legs, especially to a 3 year old. Those guys have a really strong grip (and spiky legs) and they can easily damage a 3 year old's skin. Things like Tenebrionids would probably be better though some also give off an odor. Some species of roaches would work though.
 

Nick H

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Feb 12, 2016
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Thanks for the replies. I'll skip these guys until my kid is a little older.

I expect that they would and so have always grabbed them in a way to not give them the opportunity (a thumb and forefinger on either side of where the thorax and abdomen meet seems to work well). In addition, they can give off a pungent odor when handled (it seems harmless on the skin at least and the smell can be removed with vinegar if one does not wish to wait until it dissipates). I would not recommend these beetles for handling. Have you considered a species of ox or rhinoceros beetle? These large beetles are probably the best for handling as they are both very sturdy and are harmless. Some species of cockroach would also be good options if looking for an insect that can be handled (to my knowledge, all cockroaches are harmless to handle, but I would not recommend trying to hold those that are small, fast and fragile).
Yeah I have 3 species of cockroach (4 if you count the random one that came with my amblypygid. Still not sure the sp. on that one) My son loves them all. I plan on getting some Dynastes tityus larvae next time Peter has some in stock. Also been considering some Odontotaenius disjunctus (Bess beetles). From what I understand those guys are pretty much never inclined to bite, despite the large mandibles. I'll probably go with those instead of the warrior beetles.
 

Nick H

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Feb 12, 2016
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I wouldn't reccomend ox or rhinoceros beetles for handling because of their spiky legs, especially to a 3 year old. Those guys have a really strong grip (and spiky legs) and they can easily damage a 3 year old's skin. Things like Tenebrionids would probably be better though some also give off an odor. Some species of roaches would work though.
Yeah I also have my eye on some blue death feigning beetles. Pretty sure those are Tenebrionids, right? I understand they are great for kids. They seem to be hard to find all the sudden though, now that I want them, haha.
 

BobBarley

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Yeah I also have my eye on some blue death feigning beetles. Pretty sure those are Tenebrionids, right? I understand they are great for kids. They seem to be hard to find all the sudden though, now that I want them, haha.
Yup they are super docile and tolerant and are great for kids!
 

ErinM31

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Yeah I also have my eye on some blue death feigning beetles. Pretty sure those are Tenebrionids, right? I understand they are great for kids. They seem to be hard to find all the sudden though, now that I want them, haha.
BugsInCyberspace has black death feigning beetles available now. The blue are often available too; I don't know whether their availability is seasonal or not.
 

Hisserdude

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The blue are often available too; I don't know whether their availability is seasonal or not.
It probably is a seasonal thing, though I could be wrong. They should be available soon though, I've seen them for sale later in the year than this.
 

Ben Curtis

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
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1
I have seen these are part of several You tube T keepers collections, looks like they are a blast to watch eat. Anyone here keep/kept them? I have read some info on them via google but not much out there on captive care.
Any people who have some first hand experience with the genus, your words would be much appreciated.
Thanks !
Hello do you know anyone that sells them looking buy a few thanks
 
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