Things you never thought you’d have

Liquifin

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 30, 2017
Messages
1,789
I got a P. ornata sling that turned out to be male, but I am thankful for him. I think it's amazing to have the chance to keep such a rare, beautiful animal, even though I'll only have him for a few years. I've noticed that too about Theraphosa species....it seems like there are so many females and so few males available. Kind of the opposite of other genera like Poecilotheria. I've read that they can be challenging to breed in captivity. I think it's great that you're willing to take on that challenge and make a contribution like that to the hobby. We need captive bred animals now more than ever.
At the moment I have a mature male and three females, but sadly, those three females are not in the best molt cycles so there might not be a good pairing/sac. I'm also still waiting for a sperm web to be made. But either way, I hope something works out since producing my favorite species is one of my life-goals.
 

Tarantuland

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2020
Messages
906
First of all, I’d 💩 my pants if I wasn’t expecting a sassy species like an OBT as a freebie 🤣
Second, good on you! I’m still a bit apprehensive about opening my Theraphosa enclosure because mine is bolty and wicked fast, so I applaud you for raising up an OBT starting at 14!
OBTs are no big deal in my opinion, I think they are similar to ceratogyrus species. They're gorgeous, but IME nhandu chromatus and B boehmei are meaner. I'd rather rehouse an OBT than a Chilobrachys lol.

But I never thought I'd have a P victori. I never thought I'd be breeding, let alone Poecilotheria species. I never thought I'd have a T seladonia, but I did for 7-8 months until it died. Also never thought I'd get a H chilensis until I got one. I'll get a birupes when the price drops, same with A moorae but who knows if that will even happen but if it does I'll be waiting. And I'll be old.
 

Charliemum

Arachnocompulsive
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
226
A common genus but brachypelma, I have just collected all I was able to in the genus, I love them because they are so chill (or all mine are I have 8) and I think the orange/red pattern on their knees look like broken hearts 😊 the Marshalli brought me to the spoods but all spoods made me stay got my first 9 months ago have 34 now n one more coming after Xmas ( don't trust the uk postal service at this time of year) .😁 Arachnocompulsive for a reason 🤣🤣🤣
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
1,322
I never thought I would have Aphonopelma mooreae and Aphonopelma sp. "Diamondback" in my collection. I knew of both species for years before they were first imported into the U.S., and when I first saw them for sale it was a record skip, spit-my-drink-all-over-the-computer-screen type of moment. I'm proud to have three of each species in my collection. :)

But to answer the questions. I have always been interested in all tarantulas so I never sought out any of one type in particular. Over the years I have kept and raised just about any type you could imagine from arboreal, obligate burrowers, old world, new world, docile, hostile, etc. These days I mainly keep ground-dwelling species from the Americas that are either unknown to science or have a confusing or unresolved taxonomy. The tarantula hobby to me now-a-days is more of a science/ natural history hobby and less of a pet hobby.
What made diamondback so impressive to you? The pictures I've seen of them look very similar to other brown aphonos
 

Craig73

Arachnodemon
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jun 2, 2016
Messages
757
I’ve become enamored with baboons. Initially went for all the colorful T’s until I started to dig the patterns and colors of them. The obt is less intimidating than my P. irminia or victori. I have a C. darlingi coming soon, so was never on my interest radar when I imagined owning a T.

What’s interesting is T’s I own that I was on the fence about I wished to be males, now excited to see some of them females because they are just amazing as I grow in my experience and comfort level.
 

QuinnStarr

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
110
OBTs are no big deal in my opinion, I think they are similar to ceratogyrus species. They're gorgeous, but IME nhandu chromatus and B boehmei are meaner. I'd rather rehouse an OBT than a Chilobrachys lol.

But I never thought I'd have a P victori. I never thought I'd be breeding, let alone Poecilotheria species. I never thought I'd have a T seladonia, but I did for 7-8 months until it died. Also never thought I'd get a H chilensis until I got one. I'll get a birupes when the price drops, same with A moorae but who knows if that will even happen but if it does I'll be waiting. And I'll be old.
I swear sometimes you come here just to say things that give me anxiety 🤣 “Nhandu chromatus are mean and I’d rather rehouse an OBT than a Chilobrachys” he says as I sit here looking at my N chromatus and Chilobrachys slings. I kid, I kid.
If/when Birupes drops, I’m buying a minimum of four. That gives me a pretty good shot at getting a female and a male. At which point, I will bring them to you once they mature 😂

A common genus but brachypelma, I have just collected all I was able to in the genus, I love them because they are so chill (or all mine are I have 8) and I think the orange/red pattern on their knees look like broken hearts 😊 the Marshalli brought me to the spoods but all spoods made me stay got my first 9 months ago have 34 now n one more coming after Xmas ( don't trust the uk postal service at this time of year) .😁 Arachnocompulsive for a reason 🤣🤣🤣
Brachys are gorgeous! I will physically fight anyone who doesn’t think that Brachypelma is just a pretty genus as a whole because they are obviously wrong.

I also understand Arachnocompulsive. I started at the end of September and just sort of dove in head first. I’m at 14 going on 15.

I’ve become enamored with baboons. Initially went for all the colorful T’s until I started to dig the patterns and colors of them. The obt is less intimidating than my P. irminia or victori. I have a C. darlingi coming soon, so was never on my interest radar when I imagined owning a T.

What’s interesting is T’s I own that I was on the fence about I wished to be males, now excited to see some of them females because they are just amazing as I grow in my experience and comfort level.
I thought Ceratogyrus species were ugly as sin and then I saw picture after picture of them in here and watched some feeding videos featuring darlingi and marshalli. I showed a picture to my friend the other day and she went “Ew, that’s ugly!” When I felt the need to defend the spider? That’s when I made the call to get one 😂
 

Craig73

Arachnodemon
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jun 2, 2016
Messages
757
I thought Ceratogyrus species were ugly as sin and then I saw picture after picture of them in here and watched some feeding videos featuring darlingi and marshalli. I showed a picture to my friend the other day and she went “Ew, that’s ugly!” When I felt the need to defend the spider? That’s when I made the call to get one 😂
I’m going to name mine Alfalfa (from the little rascals). Sometimes pics don’t do things justice. My I. mira is a good example, pretty feet but the abdomen is equally stunning in its own right.
 

QuinnStarr

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
110
I’m going to name mine Alfalfa (from the little rascals). Sometimes pics don’t do things justice. My I. mira is a good example, pretty feet but the abdomen is equally stunning in its own right.
We must be twins because I was going to call my marshalli the SAME THING 🤣
 

MotherofDragons

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 24, 2021
Messages
14
I never thought I would have Aphonopelma mooreae and Aphonopelma sp. "Diamondback" in my collection.
I'm going to have to go search to see if you've posted any pictures of the A. sp. diamond-backs now... These fascinate me, but I can't decide if I like them. Pictures vary so much.

I have an apophysis.
I saw one of these in person at my LRS. It was truly beautiful. I was going through their T's section and this one reacted every time I moved my hands around. Albeit, she didn't have any type of hide in her little box which I am sure could contribute to that, but I was wondering if this is a spunky/defensive species? I ended up going two days in a row and made sure to take a picture day 2 and note the species for future reference. It was probably closer to 4" if I had to guess.
Theraphosa apophysis.jpg
 
Last edited:

QuinnStarr

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
110
I saw one of these in person at my LRS. It was truly beautiful. I was going through their T's section and this one reacted every time I moved my hands around. Albeit, she didn't have any type of hide in her little box which I am sure could contribute to that, but I was wondering if this is a spunky/defensive species? I ended up going two days in a row and made sure to take a picture day 2 and note the species for future reference. It was probably closer to 4" if I had to guess.
View attachment 404859
From my reading up on them, they have NASTY hairs - some of the worst in the hobby - and they are pretty avid kickers. I haven’t seen mine kick but it also hasn’t come out of its hide in 5 weeks due to premolt.

Mine is very skittish at the moment but I’ve heard of them getting a bit better about that as they get bigger, even becoming a decent display tarantula. It’s yet to threat pose me or the two crickets I offered while it was in premolt. Not to say it won’t threat pose, just that mine hasn’t.

Great feeding response outside of being full/about to molt. But they are FAST. I popped the lid to its shipping vial, set it in the enclosure and then I thought I saw the moss move but I was like “no way” and then I peeked and there was the spider.

T. apophysis are less bulky than their two counterparts, their size comes from their insanely long legs instead of their body mass.

Honestly, I love mine and I’m looking at getting another two or three after we move and I have more room for the big boys and girls.
 

AphonopelmaTX

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 7, 2004
Messages
1,614
What made diamondback so impressive to you? The pictures I've seen of them look very similar to other brown aphonos
It's their dark colored 4th leg which contrasts with the color of its body combined with the triangle marking on the back of the carapace that drew me to them. It is such a strange combination of markings that I couldn't resist buying a few. The spiderlings however do not have the triangle and dark legs and look the same as any other boring brown Aphonopelma species. I'm anxious to find out when they start showing the adult markings.

I'm going to have to go search to see if you've posted any pictures of the A. sp. diamond-backs now... These fascinate me, but I can't decide if I like them. Pictures vary so much.
The only picture I have posted of my Diamondbacks is of one spiderling in its enclosure and it doesn't even show off what it looks like. You can see it here...


I haven't put any effort in taking good pictures of them because the spiderlings are fairly unremarkable and are burrowed away. The adult female I have won't sit still long enough for me to get a clear picture of it.
 

The Spider House

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 12, 2020
Messages
176
I have been very lucky to be able to keep at some point most tarantulas out there in the hobby.

I have moved away from the "must have" bright new species and have reverted back to many of what most people would call the staple species as they bring me more joy and also some success in breeding which is my real passion for the hobby now.

My Top 3 genus
1. Brachypelma are by far my favourite genus and I have 93 Brachypelma in my 236 T count.

2. Probably Grammostola which I have several rosea RCF, porterii, pulchripes, maule, grossa, actaeon, ihiringhi, concepcion and pulchra.

3. Theraphosa as they are just simply impressive and imposing all at the same time - currently 9 blondi, 2 stirmi and 3 apophysis.

I favour NW over OW with about 96% of the collection being NW.

I think the key mesage is there is a T out there for everyone, whether that be based on colour, temperament, arboreal vs terrestrial, OW vs NW.

And...there will always be "the one" that is a massive part of your life. For me, that was my Acanthoscurria geniculata 'Genie' a 9 inch 25 year+ gorgeous spider that unfortunately passed away earlier this year. She meant everything to me and adorns my walls, phone covers, screen savers, profile pics etc etc. She was special 💖
 

l4nsky

Aspiring Mad Genius
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
707
This angry girl
20210716_143133.jpg
20210716_143327.jpg

And...there will always be "the one" that is a massive part of your life. For me, that was my Acanthoscurria geniculata 'Genie' a 9 inch 25 year+ gorgeous spider that unfortunately passed away earlier this year. She meant everything to me and adorns my walls, phone covers, screen savers, profile pics etc etc. She was special 💖
My condolences and at the same time, that's an impressive commitment. I'm hoping I can have this type of history with my 0.1 P. muticus. She was my first tarantula and is only ~4 years old.
 

jrh3

Exuvium
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 4, 2011
Messages
1,154
OBTs are no big deal in my opinion, I think they are similar to ceratogyrus species. They're gorgeous, but IME nhandu chromatus and B boehmei are meaner. I'd rather rehouse an OBT than a Chilobrachys lol.
You wanna come pull this OBT sac for me Saturday? 😂 She is big and ain’t scared to slap or bite. Hopefully she didn’t eat the sac because she was cleaning web from around it, yesterday, its hard to see in he burrow, She lives underground most of the time. But for real she is not as defensive as my cambridgei but I still don’t like rehousing her at all.
 

Tarantuland

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2020
Messages
906
If you were closer to me I'd legit be willing to try for some slings lol. I still haven't pulled a sac, but that'll be changing soon. I'm not saying I take them lightly, just that my personal OBT is less mean than some of my other spiders. Once I have more years under my belt maybe I'll feel differently...but the meanest spider I have right now is an unknown Chilobrachys.
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
755
If you were closer to me I'd legit be willing to try for some slings lol. I still haven't pulled a sac, but that'll be changing soon. I'm not saying I take them lightly, just that my personal OBT is less mean than some of my other spiders. Once I have more years under my belt maybe I'll feel differently...but the meanest spider I have right now is an unknown Chilobrachys.
I agree. Chilobrachys are defensive and they are FAST. Much faster and more defensive that an OBT in my opinion. And species in this genus are definitely ones you don't want to get bitten by!
 

Metallattorney

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
32
Oh man, where to start. My experience in this hobby has vastly evolved from where I thought I would be when I started.

1. I never thought I would own more than maybe one or two tarantulas. I have 30 right now.

2. I did not think I would go for fossorial species. My first three were NW terrestrials that were usually out and about where they could be seen. Now my collection is primarily centered around baboons, several of whom hide most of the time.

3. I was never sure I would get the species that initially attracted me to the hobby, the cyriopagopus lividus due to the concern over its speed and venom. I have an adult female who is shockingly docile and is typically able to be seen at least once a day.

4. When I first got into the hobby, I had no idea I would get an OBT. Not because I was scared off by them, but they did not initially appeal to me much. I got an OBT when I started really getting into the baboons and figured I should own one. I love my OBT. One of my favorite tarantulas.

Now for something I hope will happen in the future: finally finding eucratoscelus pachypus.
 
Top